•   
  •   

OffbeatForget “hygge.” The most useful Danish word is about stress

08:40  06 march  2019
08:40  06 march  2019 Source:   qz.com

This untranslatable Danish word is the key to lowering stress

This untranslatable Danish word is the key to lowering stress 'Pyt,' recently voted Danes' most popular word, is a cultural concept about cultivating healthy thoughts to deal with stress. As a native Dane and a psychologist, I think the concepts that underpin the word are applicable to people everywhere. A way to move on Pyt is usually expressed as an interjection in reaction to a daily hassle, frustration or mistake. It most closely translates to the English sayings, “Don’t worry about it,” “stuff happens,” or “oh, well.” You might shatter a glass in the kitchen, shrug and say, “pyt.

Forget “hygge.” The most useful Danish word is about stress© Provided by Atlantic Media, Inc. Danish flags are pictured outside a cafe at the famous landmark Nyhavn in Copenhagen

Danes are some of the happiest people in the world, and they also happen to have a lot of cool words for ways to be happy.

You may have heard about “hygge,” which has been the subject of countless books, articles, and commercials. Often mistranslated to mean “cozy,” it really describes the process of creating intimacy.

But another word “pyt”—which sort of sounds like “pid”—was recently voted the most popular word by Danes, beating out “dvæle” (to linger) and “krænkelsesparat” (ready to take offense).

Domingos Tótora builds cardboard furniture

 Domingos Tótora builds cardboard furniture Cardboard, water and glue furniture © Domingos Tótora Totora Recycling? If gold is made from rubbish, it should be called alchemy. And that is what happens in the studio of Domingos Tótora : old boxes are shredded, softened in water and processed to a pulpy mass. Pressed and mixed with paste, it is shaped by hand and dried in the sun. "It's like a cycle. Cardboard is made of wood. And our process leads back to a wood-like material.

Pyt doesn’t have an exact English translation. It’s more a cultural concept about cultivating healthy thoughts to deal with stress. As a native Dane and a psychologist, I think the concepts that underpin the word are applicable to people everywhere.

Forget “hygge.” The most useful Danish word is about stress© Getty closeup of a young man reading a book with a cup of coffee in his hand with the text hygge, a danish and norwegian word for comfort or enjoy, which can be a whole philosophy of life

A way to move on

Pyt is usually expressed as an interjection in reaction to a daily hassle, frustration, or mistake. It most closely translates to the English sayings, “Don’t worry about it,” “stuff happens,” or “oh, well.”

You might shatter a glass in the kitchen, shrug and say, “pyt.” You might see a parking ticket lodged under your windshield wiper and, just as you become hot with anger, shake your head and murmur, “pyt.”

George Pell's full sentencing, as issued by Chief Judge Peter Kidd

George Pell's full sentencing, as issued by Chief Judge Peter Kidd George Pell's full sentencing, as issued by Chief Judge Peter Kidd

At its core, it’s about accepting and resetting. It’s used as a reminder to step back and refocus rather than overreact. Instead of assigning blame, it’s a way to let go and move on.

You might say “pyt” in response to something you did—“pyt, that was a dumb thing to say”—or to support another person—“pyt with that, don’t fret about your coworker’s insensitivity.”

Pyt can reduce stress because it is a sincere attempt to encourage yourself and others to not get bogged down by minor daily frustrations. One Danish business leader has suggested that knowing when to say “pyt” at work can lead to more job satisfaction.

Forget “hygge.” The most useful Danish word is about stress© Getty Young adult woman over grunge grey wall wearing glasses clueless and confused expression with arms and hands raised. Doubt concept.

Overcoming the tendency to blame

There’s a rich strain of psychological research devoted to understanding how we interpret and react to other people’s actions.

Tweet Reveals Hilarious Old-Fashioned Word for “Spinster,” Goes Viral

Tweet Reveals Hilarious Old-Fashioned Word for “Spinster,” Goes Viral Writer Sophia Benoit discovered that married women over the age of 26 used to be called "thornbacks" instead of "spinsters." And the internet is going wild.

Studies show that we are happier and live longer when we have fewer daily hassles. And in some cases, what constitutes a hassle might be tied to how we interpret what’s happening around us.

Pyt can help people avoid the tendency to blame others. Say you’re late to an appointment and there’s a person in front of you who’s driving slowly. It can feel irrationally personal.

But research shows that we get angrier when we explain someone’s behavior by pointing to their incompetence, intentionality, or poor character.

By saying “pyt,” you’re deciding that it’s not worth letting someone else’s actions, which are out of your control, bother you; it’s “water off a duck’s back.” You can also use other strategies, such as thinking about situational constraints—maybe the driver was ill—or considering whether this will be an issue in two hours, two days, or two weeks.

Forget “hygge.” The most useful Danish word is about stress© Getty A furiously angry woman driving yells, shaking her fist through the windshield in a bout of road rage!

Of course, you wouldn’t say “pyt” in response to being seriously wronged. And the word shouldn’t be used when you ought to take responsibility. Nor should it be used as an excuse for inaction.

Science says you should be careful how you use the word 'the'

Science says you should be careful how you use the word 'the' One unassuming little word can change our perception of politics and race in surprising ways.

Danes who teach positive psychology have also written about how applying pyt to too many aspects of your life isn’t healthy, especially if they concern your core needs or values.

Hitting the pyt button

Letting go can also be facilitated by doing things like walking in nature, doing yoga or mediation, exercising, keeping a journal, or engaging in creative work.

Or you can always get a pyt button. Danish teachers use pyt buttons to teach their students how to let go. Teachers find that it can help children cope with smaller frustrations—“I lost the game” or “I can’t find my favorite pencil”—and it helps to teach them that everything can’t be perfect.

These are important skills to learn. Research shows that perfectionism is related to worry and depression. Meanwhile, self-compassion and social support can help prevent perfectionism from leading to these negative outcomes.

In recent years, the pyt button has become popular among Danish adults, who can either make one at home or buy one that, when pressed, says, “pyt pyt pyt” and “breathe deeply, it will all be okay” in Danish.

And in this case, there might be an English equivalent: the reset button.

Gallery: ways to combat work stress  [Photo Services]

Read more

Australian government to spend millions attracting Chinese tourists.
The $5 million advertising campaign, which is using Australia's natural scenery to target young Chinese urbanites, launches this week.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!