Offbeat: No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit - PressFrom - Australia
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OffbeatNo dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit

16:12  25 may  2019
16:12  25 may  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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In 2014, three baby green anacondas were born by parthenogenesis at a zoo in the UK. That makes the New England Aquarium home to the second Of the three born alive, two survived. The aquarium staff has noticed two very different personalities in the snakes . The thinner is pretty chill, while the

+ Two baby green anacondas were recently born at the New England Aquarium in Boston, which would normally be But in a twist reminiscent of Jurassic Park, the babies were born in an all - female exhibit . (Unlike most snake species, anacondas don’t lay eggs, instead giving birth to live snakes .)

No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit© Getty Snake eggs found in a house garden

Life finds a way. Anna, a 10-foot-long adult green anaconda in residence at Boston's New England Aquarium delivered some babies this past winter. That wouldn't be remarkable, except all the other snakes in the aquarium's Amazon exhibit are also female.

The aquarium staff re-checked the snakes' genders and scrutinized Anna's life history to confirm she hadn't been exposed to any adult males. Everything checked out, but they also sent off tissue samples for DNA analysis to confirm what they suspected: parthenogenesis.

Parthenogenesis is a type of asexual reproduction without fertilization. The term comes from the Greek for "virgin creation."

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In 2014, three baby green anacondas were born by parthenogenesis at a zoo in the UK. That makes the New England Aquarium home to the second Of the That wouldn't be remarkable, except all the other snakes in the aquarium's Amazon exhibit are also female . The aquarium staff re-checked the

Two baby green anacondas born at the New England Aquarium appear to be exact clones of their mother — because they were born through a process that doesn’t require the fertilization from a male. He said aquarium officials had been puzzled by the new arrivals in an all - female exhibit .

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No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit
No dudes needed: Baby anaconda snakes born in all-female exhibit

"These two young appear to be genetic copies or clones of the mother," the aquarium said in a blog post Thursday.

Baby giraffe born at South Australian zoo

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In 2014, three baby green anacondas were born by parthenogenesis at a zoo in the UK. That makes the New England Aquarium home to the second Of the three born alive, two survived. The aquarium staff has noticed two very different personalities in the snakes . The thinner is pretty chill, while the

The phenomenon is rare in reptiles, but not unheard of. In 2014, three baby green anacondas were born by parthenogenesis at a zoo in the UK. That makes the New England Aquarium home to the second confirmed case for these snakes.

Most of Anna's babies were stillborn. Of the three born alive, two survived. The aquarium staff has noticed two very different personalities in the snakes. The thinner is pretty chill, while the heavier one enjoys exploring its environment.

The bambinos are being kept behind the scenes for now. Green anacondas, which can weigh up to 550 pounds (250 kilograms), are the world's largest snake species, so these rare kiddos won't stay dainty for long.


Two newborn baboons join a growing troop at Melbourne Zoo.
Melbourne Zoo is celebrating the arrival of not one, but two healthy baby baboons. The pair of Hamadryas baboons currently weigh little more than 500 grams and are clinging close the chest of their mothers, Qethesh and Macey. Identifiable by their silver-grey coat and pink or red face and rump, the newborn duo join a growing troop of nine infants and children, all under the age of five. Melbourne Zoo Primate Keeper Andrew Thompson said the two new arrivals were active, inquisitive, and had settled in well with the support of their mothers.

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