Offbeat: What Are Those Squiggles of Tar You See on Roads? - - PressFrom - Australia
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Offbeat What Are Those Squiggles of Tar You See on Roads?

06:28  25 september  2019
06:28  25 september  2019 Source:   mentalfloss.com

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Does anyone own that dog? What are those brightly colored balls doing on those power lines? And why do roads appear to be covered in squiggles of tar ? The tar squiggles are different from the black rubber tubes you often see on roadways, which are used by officials to measure traffic.

While the black stuff that you see on the roads looks like tar , these days it's more likely to be some sort of high-performance polymer-asphalt mix, designed to form a bond that 's flexible enough to keep the road from cracking even more. Crews apply it to the fissures with a device that looks vaguely like

a close up of a green field: What Are Those Squiggles of Tar You See on Roads?© Harry Wedzinga/iStock via Getty Images What Are Those Squiggles of Tar You See on Roads?

Driving through towns can provoke a series of questions. Why is this person going so slowly? Does anyone own that dog? What are those brightly colored balls doing on those power lines? And why do roads appear to be covered in squiggles of tar?

The arterial lines are a common sight on paved roadways, spreading indiscriminately through the lanes. They’re part of the seemingly endless cycle of keeping roads in operable shape.

The tar (actually a polymer mix) is applied to asphalt that has developed cracks due to normal wear and tear from traffic. Sometimes this is due to the volume of vehicles passing over roads. Other times, seasonal weather changes can cause the pavement to contract. Different kinds of cracking can occur, from fatigue cracking—which typically requires a comprehensive resurfacing—to reflection cracking that happens as a result of the concrete and asphalt layers shifting. Edge cracking is the wear you see along the margins of the road.

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Its a rubberized tar poured into the cracks in the road surface. It also prevents the cracks from getting any bigger. Sometimes the lines you see are covering old road lines where the road has been expanded or the path has been changed to prevent drivers being confused.

What are Squiggle 's weaknesses? Some quirks of Squiggle , which you may decide to compensate All the numbers used by Squiggle are that way because they worked best (i.e. made the most To view historical tips from Squiggle (and other models) irrespective of the algorithm, see the Squiggle

The filler is typically the most effective and quickest method of resolving the cracks before they become a road hazard—costing about $2500 per mile, compared to $60,000 per mile for a brand-new surface.

While halting a massive crack in its tracks is fine for cars, motorcycles are another story. Because the squiggles create a slightly raised bump, two-wheeled vehicles need to be careful about running over them. Bikers have a derisive term for the patch jobs: tar snake.

In addition to changing the surface, the mix can become slick in bad weather, leading motorcyclists to lose control of their bikes. They can also allow for foreign objects to “sink” into their pliable material, creating further hazards. It’s advisable for bike enthusiasts to slow down when they see the lines coming up in their path.

The tar squiggles are different from the black rubber tubes you often see on roadways, which are used by officials to measure traffic.

Melbourne City councillor 'envisions' smoke-free CBD .
City of Melbourne councillor Beverley Pinder says it is her "vision" for the Melbourne CBD to be totally smoke-free one day.  From tomorrow, smokers will no longer be able to light up a cigarette in Melbourne's famous Bourke Street Mall. "Passive smoking is the big danger here, it's actually affecting our passers-by, our people who come to our city," Ms Pinder told Sky News host Darryn Hinch. The new smoke-free zone, which includes footpaths, roads and tramways, will be in effect on Bourke Street between Elizabeth Street and Russell Place.

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