Offbeat: This Mom’s Explanation to Her Son About How College “Worked” Before Email Is Hilarious - - PressFrom - Australia
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Offbeat This Mom’s Explanation to Her Son About How College “Worked” Before Email Is Hilarious

17:31  03 october  2019
17:31  03 october  2019 Source:   bestlifeonline.com

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He recently texted her from college to earnestly ask, “ How did any of college work before email ?” And the conversation that ensued will really bring you back. You had to call a phone number and talk to someone about your interest in the position, his mom explained. “I can’t imagine having to interact

Mom explains to son how college worked before the internet. Kids today will never know what it was like to register for a class in person. Torrence understands life before Google and Amazon is a hard concept for young people to grasp. It even seems strange to her sometimes.

a man reading a book: College students today are put under quite a bit of pressure to perform well in school, take on internships, and maintain jobs. And understandably, all of these responsibilities are putting pressure on undergraduates more than ever before. One survey from The American Institute of Stress found that from 2003 to 2008 alone, the number of students who noted frequently experiencing stress in their daily lives increased by 20 percent.© Provided by Best Life

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Young people today tend to struggle to understand how the rest of us managed to survive before smartphones and email. You can see their eyes widen in disbelief when we explain that, yes, we did get around using a physical map and, no, we didn’t submit term papers electronically. Which is probably why anyone over the age of 40 can really relate to this hilarious text exchange between Kathy Torrence, 51, and her 20-year-old son. He recently texted her from college to earnestly ask, “How did any of college work before email?” And the conversation that ensued will really bring you back.

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For example, how did she know if a class was canceled, he wondered?

By reading the note on the door that said, “Class is canceled,” Torrence told him. But… but… that meant having to  wake up early and physically walk across campus just to turn back around? Why, yes—yes, it did.

a screenshot of a cell phone: mom explains how college worked before the internet to son© Provided by Best Life mom explains how college worked before the internet to son

Then, he asked: “How would you find out about anything?”

Well, you carried a notepad and pen around with you in order to write down interesting opportunities posted on a bulletin board, which Torrence explained was a “cork board with push pins.”

a screenshot of a cell phone© Provided by Best Life

“But how would you read that without walking all the way to the building?” Torrence’s son asked. (You can practically hear her “sigh” that followed.)

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I see a mom lashing out at the son she believes let her down. And my problems with that are: It’ s not about you. You made sacrifices, yes, but those Email Carolyn at [email protected], follow her on Facebook at facebook.com/carolyn.hax or chat with her online at noon Eastern time each Friday at

“The moms — the four or five moms that started it together — we started it, we helped, but we did College has been on their radar since her son was in diapers. “We’ve been working on this since he It starts early, when parents get on wait lists for elite preschools before their babies are born and try

a screenshot of a cell phone: mom son viral text exchange © Provided by Best Life mom son viral text exchange

Eventually, Torrence’s son sort of grasped the concept of reading the job posting on the cork board thingy. But then what?

You had to call a phone number and talk to someone about your interest in the position, his mom explained.

“I can’t imagine having to interact with an actual human for [a job],” he responded. (Understandably, Torrence didn’t explain the Yellow Pages to him. He doesn’t seem ready for that.)

a screenshot of a cell phone: mom explains how college worked before the internet to son© Provided by Best Life mom explains how college worked before the internet to son

With Torrence’s permission, her friend Barbara Noble Sobel posted the exchange on Facebook on September 20th, and it quickly went viral, with more than 24,000 shares in less than two weeks.

Most people wrote that they couldn’t stop laughing at the messages, and added their own memories of life in what sometimes now feels like the Stone Age.

Sure, it might not sound great to today’s young whippersnappers. But if you lived through it, don’t you sometimes find yourself waxing nostalgic about how much simpler things were just a few short decades ago?

“With the limitations on communication, things were so different,” Torrence told Today in an interview about the now-viral texts. “But we didn’t realize—you can’t miss what you don’t have.” Ah, the glory days.

And for another fun story about schooling before the age of the smartphone, check out 12 Hilarious Questions Young People Have About the ’90s.


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