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Offbeat Why do we eat cranberry sauce on thanksgiving?

06:15  21 november  2019
06:15  21 november  2019 Source:   mentalfloss.com

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Your Thanksgiving cranberry sauce —be it homemade or Ocean Spray’s canned classic—is all part of America’s history. Although we don’t know for sure whether it was eaten at the very first Thanksgiving , the jiggly, gelatinous side dish does have deep roots in the history of America’s fruited

Thursday, 21 November 2019 Why do we eat cranberry sauce on Thanksgiving ? | Careful Man #Careful_Man.

a bowl of fruit sitting on top of a wooden table© MSPhotographic/iStock via Getty Images

While plenty of people eat turkey, mashed potatoes, and pie year-round, it seems like cranberry sauce almost exclusively exists in the Thanksgiving universe. Although we don’t know for sure whether it was eaten at the very first Thanksgiving, the jiggly, gelatinous side dish does have deep roots in the history of America’s fruited plains.

According to Insider, cranberries are one of only three commercially grown fruits native to the United States, and the Wampanoag tribe had been using them for food, dye, and medicine long before feasting with the Pilgrims in 1621. If there were cranberries at the party, they probably didn’t taste much like the sweetened sauce we’re (circumstantially) fond of today; at that point, the settlers hadn’t yet succeeded in growing sugar cane in the New World.

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Why do we eat turkey on Thanksgiving ? It's not necessarily because the pilgrims did it. While the cranberries the Pilgrims needed were probably easy to come by, making cranberry sauce requires sugar. Sugar was a rare luxury at the time of the first Thanksgiving , so while revelers may have

Typical dishes include bread stuffing, potatoes, cranberry sauce , pumpkin pie, and, above all, turkey. How did turkey become the centerpiece of this feast? It is often assumed that today’s Thanksgiving menu originated in an event commonly referred to as the “first Thanksgiving .”

But a little more than 50 years later, according to a 1672 account cited by The Washington Post, the new Americans and Native Americans had both started to enjoy cranberries much like we do at Thanksgiving dinner: “Indians and English use it much, boyling them with Sugar for a Sauce to eat with their Meat.”

In 1796, Amelia Simmons—author of American Cookery, the first-ever American cookbook—took it one step further by recommending that roast turkey be served with cranberry sauce. Considering that the Library of Congress included the book on its list of “Books That Shaped America,” it’s possible that Simmons’s suggestion reverberated through kitchens across the nation, and the tradition gained momentum from there. She does mention pickled mangoes as an alternate side dish for turkey, but the then-Indian import was likely less common than the locally-grown cranberry.

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Why do you eat cranberry sauce on Thanksgiving ? Cranberry sauce was used to preserve some dried meats, and was sweet but healthy to eat , so We eat : Turkey Cranberry sauce Stuffing Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Green Beans Candy yams Tuna casserole Rolls Deviled eggs For dessert pie i.

Why do you eat cranberry sauce on Thanksgiving ? Cranberry sauce was used to preserve some dried meats, and was sweet but healthy to eat , so We eat : Turkey Cranberry sauce Stuffing Mashed Potatoes and Gravy Green Beans Candy yams Tuna casserole Rolls Deviled eggs For dessert pie i

Then, in the early 1800s, Ocean Spray revolutionized the labor-intensive process of hand-picking cranberries from vines with what’s called a wet harvest. Basically, farmers flood the bogs where cranberries grow, and then they wade into the water to collect the floating berries en masse.

a person standing next to a body of water: farmer wet-harvesting cranberries© Provided by Sportority, Inc. (Mental Floss) farmer wet-harvesting cranberries

This was a more efficient technique, but a mass harvest meant that more cranberries got damaged. So in 1912, Ocean Spray began crushing them into canned, jellied cranberry sauce—maximizing the yield and making it easier than ever for every home in America to slice up a cylinder of solid, sugary, berry goodness.

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Black Friday online sales are currently on track to reach $US7.4 billion, while Thanksgiving Day sales already beat records by surpassing $US4 billion for the first time, according to Adobe Analytics. An increasing percentage of these sales are coming from online shopping, with a significant uptick in purchases made on mobile devices. Adobe Analytics found that nearly half of Black Friday sales thus far have come from a smartphone, at a rate 24.4% higher than during the 2018 shopping season. Sign up for Business Insider's retail newsletter, The Drive-Thru.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

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