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Offbeat Older than the sun: Stardust revealed as oldest solid material on earth

13:17  14 january  2020
13:17  14 january  2020 Source:   news.sky.com

Stardust found inside Murchison meteorite in Victoria is oldest-known solid material on Earth

  Stardust found inside Murchison meteorite in Victoria is oldest-known solid material on Earth The oldest solid material ever found on Earth has been discovered inside a meteorite that landed near Murchison 50 years ago.This makes it the oldest solid material found on Earth the researchers said. It's even older than our Earth and the Sun, which are 4.5 and 4.6 billion years old respectively.

Stardust that formed more than 5bn years ago, long before the birth of the Earth and the sun , has been discovered in a meteorite that crashed down in Australia, making it the oldest known solid material on the planet. The tiny granules of stardust , shed by ancient stars as they expired, reveal

THE oldest material ever found on Earth has been discovered lurking in a meteorite that fell to our planet. Ancient stardust dating back seven Ancient stardust dating back seven billion years was identified by scientists, making the mysterious matter a good deal older than both Earth and the Sun .

a close up of a cake: The  presolar silicon carbide grain is around eight micrometers in its longest dimension Pic:  Janaina N. Avila/PA © PA The presolar silicon carbide grain is around eight micrometers in its longest dimension Pic: Janaina N. Avila/PA

Particles from a long dead star found inside a meteorite that fell to earth in the 1960s have been identified as the oldest solid material ever discovered.

The real-life stardust was formed up to seven billion years ago, long before our own sun had been born.

Stars are created when dust and gas floating through space find each other, collapse in on each other and heat up.

After burning for millions of years they die and throw particles that formed in their winds out in to space.

Those bits of stardust or presolar grains eventually form new stars, along with new planets and moons and meteorites.

Oldest stuff on Earth found inside meteorite that hit Australia

  Oldest stuff on Earth found inside meteorite that hit Australia Oldest stuff on Earth found inside meteorite that hit AustraliaA meteorite that crashed into rural southeastern Australia in a fireball in 1969 contained the oldest material ever found on Earth, stardust that predated the formation of our solar system by billions of years, scientists said on Monday.

"These are the oldest solid materials ever found, and they tell us about how stars formed in our galaxy." The materials Heck and his colleagues examined are called presolar grains-minerals formed before the Sun was born. "They're solid samples of stars , real stardust ," says Heck.

Dust -rich outflows of evolved stars similar to the pictured Egg Nebula are plausible sources of the large presolar silicon carbide grains found in meteorites like Murchison. The materials Heck and his colleagues examined are called presolar grains-minerals formed before the Sun was born.

Researchers from the The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago analysed presolar grains found in the Murchison meteorite that fell in Victoria, Australia, in 1969.

Exposure age data allowed the researchers to measure their exposure to cosmic rays - high-energy protons and atomic nuclei which move through space at nearly the speed of light.

By measuring how many of the new cosmic-ray produced elements are present in a pre-solar grain, the scientists could calculate how long it was exposed to cosmic rays, telling them how old it is.

Based on how many cosmic rays they had soaked up, most of the grains had to be 4.6 to 4.9 billion years old, and some grains were older than 5.5 billion years.

Lead author of the study, Professor Philipp Heck, said: "This is one of the most exciting studies I've worked on.

A meteor that struck Australia brought indestructible stardust more ancient than the sun. It's the oldest solid material ever found on Earth.

  A meteor that struck Australia brought indestructible stardust more ancient than the sun. It's the oldest solid material ever found on Earth. In 1969, a 4.6-billion-year-old meteorite struck Murchison, Australia. The meteorite contained fragments of stardust called presolar grains. This stardust is between between 5 billion and 7 billion years old - older than the sun and our solar system. Most of the grains in the Murchison meteorite came from various stars that formed around the same time. This suggests stars are born in bursts, rather than at a constant rate. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Meteorite fragments found in Australia appear to have brought rare, interstellar passengers to Earth: pieces of stardust older than the sun.

The oldest thing ever found on Earth has been discovered by scientists, and it is more than two billion years older than our planet. “These are the oldest solid materials ever found, and they tell us about how stars formed in our With stardust , we can trace that material back to the time before the Sun .”

Scientists analysing a meteorite have discovered the oldest material known to exist on Earth . The oldest of the dust grains were formed in stars that roared to life long before our Solar System was born. "They're solid samples of stars , real stardust ," said lead author Philipp Heck, a curator at

"These are the oldest solid materials ever found, and they tell us about how stars formed in our galaxy."

He added: "They're solid samples of stars, real stardust."

Publishing the results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team described how analysing the presolar grains also unlocked secrets of the dying stars stars from which they came.

The presolar grains are likely to have originated from stars similar to those in Egg Nebula Pic: NASA © Other The presolar grains are likely to have originated from stars similar to those in Egg Nebula Pic: NASA

The researchers suggest that seven billion years ago, there was a bumper crop of new stars forming and the Murchison meteorite grains came from these.

"We have more young grains that we expected," said Prof Heck.

"Our hypothesis is that the majority of those grains, which are 4.6 to 4.9 billion years old, formed in an episode of enhanced star formation.

"There was a time before the start of the Solar System when more stars formed than normal."

Interstellar Stardust Found Inside Australian Meteorite Is A Staggering 7 Billion Years Old

  Interstellar Stardust Found Inside Australian Meteorite Is A Staggering 7 Billion Years Old A meteorite that crashed into Australia back in 1969 contains stardust dating back some 7 billion years, predating the formation of Earth by 2.5 billion years. The remarkable discovery offers a snapshot of the conditions that existed long before our solar system came into existence. Ancient grains found inside the Murchison meteorite have been dated to between 5 billion and 7 billion years old, according to new research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The new paper was led by astronomer Philipp Heck from the University of Chicago.

Scientists recently identified the oldest material on Earth : stardust that's 7 billion years old , tucked away in a massive, rocky meteorite New analysis of dozens of presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite revealed a range of ages, from about 4 million years older than our sun — which formed

7-billion-year- old stardust is the oldest stuff on Earth . An electron microscope image of an 8-micrometer-wide Microscopic grains of dead stars are the oldest known material on the planet — older than the “We’ve used this really old sample, the oldest solid samples available to science

Scientists also found that presolar grains often float through space stuck together in large clusters like "granola", something that had not previously been thought possible on that scale.

RELATED: The most stunning space pictures ever

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