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Offbeat Can Mosquitoes Spread Coronavirus? The New Research You Need to Know About

04:31  03 june  2020
04:31  03 june  2020 Source:   bestlifeonline.com

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Can mosquitoes spread coronavirus ? By Alexandria Hein | Fox News. Mosquitoes are a common summer-time foe that are known vectors of the West Nile Virus, Zika, Chikungunya and several However, for this to become a threat to humans, a series of particular events would need to occur.

"While the current [ coronavirus ] specific research is limited, the results of available studies are consistent with aerosolization of virus from normal breathing," according to the letter, written by Dr. Harvey Fineberg, chairman of a committee with the What you need to know about coronavirus .

a close up of an animal: You're probably not surprised to hear that playing electronic dance music (EDM) can scare people away—but as it turns out, it can do the same with mosquitos. In a 2019 study in Acta Tropica, researchers played the Skrillex song © Provided by Best Life

You're probably not surprised to hear that playing electronic dance music (EDM) can scare people away—but as it turns out, it can do the same with mosquitos. In a 2019 study in Acta Tropica, researchers played the Skrillex song "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites"—which combines "very high and very low frequencies" with "excessive loudness and constantly escalating pitch"—and it discouraged yellow fever mosquitos from biting victims and from mating.

With the weather heating up as summer approaches, a familiar pest is once again returning: the mosquito. And while their uncomfortable stings are irritating enough as it is, during the coronavirus pandemic, getting bitten by one of those bloodsuckers is a more concerning experience, leaving many wondering—can mosquito bites transmit coronavirus?

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The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses . At this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks.

Considering the long list of diseases mosquitoes are known to transmit—including Zika virus, malaria, dengue fever, West Nile virus, and Chikungunya virus, according to the CDC—it's understandable that people are concerned about the potential for bugs to transmit coronavirus, as well. And now new research will attempt to answer that question. According to an April 15 memo from ProPublica, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) will begin investigating mosquito bites as a possible means of coronavirus transmission.

But here's the good news: The odds of mosquito-borne coronavirus cases are extremely low, according to experts.

mosquito bite bug spray © Provided by Best Life mosquito bite bug spray

Leann Poston, MD, of Ikon Health, says it's "highly unlikely" that mosquitoes could pass the virus from person to person, since it's primarily spread through respiratory droplets. "For a mosquito to transmit it, the COVID virus would have to be in the circulatory system (blood) of the person bitten," after which the virus would need to reproduce inside the mosquito, which has never been shown to occur, explains Poston. After this, "the virus would need to go to the salivary glands of the mosquito" in order to infect another human through a bite.

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Catching the new coronavirus DOES NOT mean you will have it for life. The new coronavirus CANNOT be transmitted through mosquito bites. Call your healthcare provider if you need assistance or seek immediate medical care if you have fever and live in an area with malaria or dengue.

The coronavirus is spreading very quickly. Older Americans, those with underlying health conditions and those without a social safety net are the most vulnerable to the Until now, experts at the C.D.C. had been saying that ordinary people didn’t need to wear masks unless they were sick and coughing.

Poston goes on to explain that, despite the cases of coronavirus that have been seen in household pets and exotic animals, "viruses that are ideally adapted to infect one species do not find other species to be good hosts."

Fortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concurs with Poston's assessment, noting that there is no evidence at the moment that either mosquitoes or ticks can spread coronavirus; the World Health Organization (WHO) also plainly states that this mode of transmission isn't possible.

While the USDA investigates, you can keep your hands washed, keep the bug spray handy, and rest easy knowing that most mosquitoes will likely leave you with little more than an itchy bite. And for myths that have been disproven, check out these 10 Myths About Face Masks You Need to Know.

members of the US National Guard infected with coronavirus .
© Drew Angerer In the US National Guard, cases of infection with the coronavirus have occurred after being deployed in anti-racism protests in Washington. The National Guard did not state the number of soldiers infected. Coronavirus infection has occurred in the United States National Guard following its deployment in anti-racism protests in Washington. This was announced on Tuesday by a spokeswoman for the National Guard unit of the capital.

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