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Sport It's not just horses who are discarded from the racing industry

02:30  27 october  2019
02:30  27 october  2019 Source:   theage.com.au

Hundreds of racehorses sent to slaughterhouses in contravention of racing rules

  Hundreds of racehorses sent to slaughterhouses in contravention of racing rules Hundreds of registered racehorses are being discarded at slaughterhouses in Australia, in contravention of racing rules, rehoming policies and animal welfare guarantees. WARNING: This story includes images which are distressing. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

Sunday, 27 October 2019 It ' s not just horses who are discarded from the racing industry | Sky Australia News One of the reasons so many former jockeys

Isn’t it about time we start looking after everyone in racing ? Credit:Morgan Hancock. Many racing participants, including myself, were horrified. But what if it wasn’t just the horses that were neglected and thrown out with the garbage once they could no longer be a contributor to our industry ?

a group of men riding on the back of a horse: Isn’t it about time we start looking after everyone in racing?© Morgan Hancock Isn’t it about time we start looking after everyone in racing?

Last Thursday the ABC's 7.30 program showed a side of racing that some people didn’t know about and others didn’t want to see. The sport of kings had its hidden skeletons exposed.

Many racing participants, including myself, were horrified. Spokespeople for governing racing bodies jumped to make media releases to the public in an attempt to clear themselves of any wrongdoing. Less than three days before the Caulfield Cup and the Everest it was most important for business that the public be satisfied with their responses.

But what if it wasn’t just the horses that were neglected and thrown out with the garbage once they could no longer be a contributor to our industry? What if it was the people too?

Prosecutions 'should' and 'will' occur following ABC report: Racing Australia CEO

  Prosecutions 'should' and 'will' occur following ABC report: Racing Australia CEO Racing Australia chief executive Barry O'Farrell said prosecutions "should, and I suspect will, occur" following ABC's 7.30 investigation into the racehorse treatment.Racing Australia chief executive Barry O'Farrell has said prosecutions "should, and I suspect will, occur" following ABC's 7.30 investigation into the treatment of racehorses.

It ’ s just that we happened to have one responsive document this year.'” They’re “not inclined” to keep track of In Pennsylvania, according to a 2017 report, the racing industry has received .6 billion in In truth, however, these horses are no less casualties than the ones who snap legs on raceday.

on Saturday, just 20 minutes from Moonee Valley Racecourse the discarded horses of the racing industry who were presumably bred for the industry but did not make the cut, alongside another Without it , day by day, horses will be loaded on to trucks to knackeries and abattoirs with nobody to

Well, it is.

In my 10 years of riding I’ve seen countless jockeys vanish, never to be seen at the races again. Some lost their nerve, some couldn’t take the sleep deprivation and some just couldn’t get enough rides to make ends meet. Believe it or not, these are the lucky ones.

I’ve seen many retire because of rising weight. Dozens stopped by career-ending falls. Two left in a wheelchair and another three (one of them a best mate that I was apprenticed with) took their own lives.

This has all happened in my 10 years of race-riding and all of them I rode with and against.

Stablehands and work riders tell a very similar tale. But, unlike jockeys (who have an association to go to and assistance funds), the stablehands have nothing. The people that ride and care for these champions that make our industry millions of dollars often end up suffering a similar fate to that of the slow racehorse.

Calls for national registry in wake of slaughterhouse investigation

  Calls for national registry in wake of slaughterhouse investigation Racing authorities have strongly condemned "horrific images" presented by the ABC following a two-year investigation, which alleges hundreds of Australian racehorses are being sent to the knackery, where they are subjected to inhumane treatment. Racing Australia's official data claims around 34 horses every year end up at slaughterhouses - a figure amounting to less than one per cent of retiring racehorses, claims the ABC.However, the national broadcaster says a two-year investigation, culminating in a report that aired on yesterday's edition of 7.30, shows the number is much higher.

It is a hard-hitting critique of the racing industry that argues the chase for glory and profit has led to a It was set up last October by Serena Miller, who has worked in racing since she was 13 and rode for a Miller set up the charity after becoming appalled by the treatment of discarded thoroughbreds: 'I was sick Miller' s charity gets no support from the multi-billion-pound racing industry and relies on

Sports. Rescuing Horses as Industry Bides Its Time. Just two weeks ago, eight horses were discovered in a kill pen in Ohio. One of them had raced 12 days earlier at nearby “There are values assigned to their pedigrees, they run for big purses, but then you see how easily they are discarded .”

As a jockey, I can say we’re extremely lucky to have such a great support network behind us. The AJA/VJA and the jockeys assistance program we have in Victoria are far beyond what most other sports have. But it would still be nice to see racing bodies care a little bit more for the people who put their lives on the line to put on the show.

Racing NSW and Racing Victoria are in competition with each other as to whose state does it better. NSW is offering $14 million and $7.5 million races while Victoria offers $100,000 cash giveaways to elite jockeys to stop them riding interstate. Yet when it comes to budget time they try to cut costs on important things such as welfare and they can’t find the funds to provide lunch and water to stablehands at the races.

One of the reasons that so many former jockeys, trainers and stablehands lose their way is because there is no place left for them in the industry once they retire or become incapacitated. For some it’s easy to find a new career path but for others when the sport they grew up in turns its back on them they have no other circles of friends and nowhere to go.

As jockeys are employees of Racing Victoria when they are injured and receiving Workcover they’re often made to come in to the office or go to the races and perform some light duties as part of their return to work. Yet I don’t see Racing Victoria, Racing NSW or Racing Australia offering these people jobs when they retire. Why can’t these people be offered training and jobs in our industry, the way ex-racehorses are supposed to be cared for? Who could be better suited to a racing-related job than someone who has dedicated their life to the sport? Isn’t it about time we start looking after everyone in racing? Horses and people, too.

Jacob Rule is a Melbourne jockey.

The Queensland greyhound adoption program gets almost $1 million a year, programs rehoming racehorses are now lucky to get $10,000 .
As racehorse rehoming programs struggle to stay viable, the Government-funded Queensland Racing Integrity Commission has been spending almost $1 million a year to help retired greyhounds.Melissa Bell has volunteered for 12 years running the Standardbred Association of Queensland's (SAQ) adoption program, which has been finding homes for former trotters since 2002.

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