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Sport On this day 2010: Brett Lee announces retirement from Test cricket

09:58  23 february  2021
09:58  23 february  2021 Source:   cricket365.com

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  Rejuvenated Steve Smith ready to fire for NSW despite having no Test cricket in sight Rejuvenated Steve Smith ready to fire for NSW despite having no Test cricket in sightSmith had a whirlwind summer against India that featured record-breaking centuries at the SCG in both limited-overs and Test cricket, while also going through a self-described disappointing run of form in the first two Tests in Adelaide and Melbourne.

Time and injuries finally caught up with Australia fast bowler Brett Lee as he announced his retirement from Test cricket on this day in 2010.

a man playing a game of baseball © Getty Images

It had been two years since the New South Wales pacemen had played in the long format of the game due to a number of niggles, with a side strain keeping him out of the 2009 series in which England reclaimed the Ashes on home soil.

Lee made his decision after speaking to his friend and former England all-rounder Andrew Flintoff, who himself had quit Test cricket after that Ashes win.

a group of baseball players standing on top of a cricket: Lee spoke to Andrew Flintoff before announcing his retirement from Test cricket (Gareth Copley/PA) © Provided by Cricket365 Lee spoke to Andrew Flintoff before announcing his retirement from Test cricket (Gareth Copley/PA)

At his peak he was one of the most feared bowlers in world cricket and is still third on the all-time list of fastest deliveries in Test cricket, behind only Shoaib Akhtar and Shaun Tait.

Will Pucovski ruled out for up to six months due to shoulder surgery

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“I’m not 21, I’m 33. Trying to bowl at 150kph (93mph) for five days is very hard on the body,” he said.

“As far as my cricket goes, anything is possible – I may play one-dayers, or no cricket at all. I may never bowl another ball and if that’s the case, I’m so satisfied with my career and my longevity.

“I’m not saying it’s definitely over, but I’m not sure what I want to be just yet.”

a baseball player pitching a ball on a field: Lee remains one of the fastest bowlers to have played Test cricket (Sean Dempsey/PA) © Provided by Cricket365 Lee remains one of the fastest bowlers to have played Test cricket (Sean Dempsey/PA)

Lee went on to play one-day and T20 internationals for another two years, and eventually retired from all cricket after the 2015 Big Bash League.

The fast bowler ended his Test career with 310 wickets in 76 matches, at the time the fourth-highest Australian total behind Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and Dennis Lillee.

Nic Maddinson and the curse of premature selection

  Nic Maddinson and the curse of premature selection If runs are the only currency of value in Australian cricket, Nic Maddinson should open his own mint. A sparkling 77 off 80 balls against a Test-quality NSW attack on Thursday reaffirmed his position as the most consistent Sheffield Shield batsman in the country. Since moving from NSW to Victoria ahead of the 2018-19 season, Maddinson’s transformation has been significant. After Thursday’s innings, he has now scored 1508 runs for the state at a more-than-healthy average of 79.4. On the surface, he should be in the frame for every Australian Test squad discussion. But in reality, he isn’t.

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Stan Lee Was a Comics Saint Who Thought He Was God .
In 1983, Stan Lee, then Marvel Comics publisher, gave insight into his editorial feedback: “Hey, that shot is too weak. If you want a guy punching something, look at the way Jack Kirby does it. Let’s try and get that kind of force. This shot is too dull. Even if it’s a man walking in the street, look at the way Gene Colan does it. It looks interesting even if there’s no action.” During Lee’s editorship of Marvel Comics, a 20-page issue had about 100 panels for epic battles and human foibles. Lee’s direction maintained visual momentum, and tied together narratives of many characters.

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