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Sport Japan will reject the contaminated waters of Fukushima

04:05  13 april  2021
04:05  13 april  2021 Source:   france24.com

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Local media say release could begin in 2022 and would take decades to complete, but local fishermen say move will destroy their industry.

Japan plans to release into the sea more than 1 million tonnes of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear station, the government said on Tuesday, a decision that is likely to anger neighbours such as South Korea. The move, more than a decade after the nuclear disaster, will deal another blow to the fishing industry in Fukushima , which has opposed such a step for years.

La centrale Fukushima le 10 mars 2021. © Kazuhiro Nogi, AFP the Fukushima power station on March 10, 2021.

Japan will dump into sea, after treatment, water from the rugged nuclear power plant. Fukushima. A decision able to provoke the anger of fishermen but also neighbors like South Korea.

The Japanese Government announced Tuesday, April 13 that it planned to spill at sea more than 1 million tonnes of water contaminated by the disaster of the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

This decision, taken more than a decade after the disaster, is a new blow for the region's fishing industry. Fishermen opposed for years at sea rejection of contaminated waters.

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Japan is to release treated radioactive water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, media reports say. It follows years of debate over how to dispose of the liquid, which includes water used to cool the power station hit by a massive tsunami in 2011. Environmental and fishing groups oppose the idea but many scientists say the risk it would pose is low. The government says no final decision has been made. The release of more than a million tonnes of water , which has been filtered to reduce radioactivity, would start in 2022 at the earliest, according to Japanese media outlets including

TOKYO — Japan plans to release into the sea more than 1 million tons of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear station, the government said on Tuesday, a decision that is likely to anger neighbors such as South Korea. The move, more than a decade after the nuclear disaster, will deal another blow to the fishing industry in Fukushima , which has opposed such a step for years. The work to release the water will begin in about two years, the government said.

Tokyo has indicated that the work to pour the contaminated waters would start in about two years.

seven years of debates

This decision puts an end to seven years of debate on how to get rid of the water from the rain, groundwater or injections necessary to cool the cores of the nuclear reactors entered in fusion after the Gigantesque tsunami of March 11, 2011.

The water will be rejected "after making sure that it is at a level (of radioactive substances, NDLR) clearly below the safety standards," said Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga , adding that the Japanese government would take "measures" to prevent this from harming the reputation of the region.

About 1.25 million tons of contaminated water are currently stored in more than a thousand tanks near the rugged nuclear power plant ten years ago in northeastern Japan. A decision was all the more urgent as the limits of the storage capacity of the on-site water could be achieved in the fall of 2022.

Japan to release treated Fukushima water into sea: reports

  Japan to release treated Fukushima water into sea: reports Japan has decided to release treated water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, reports said Friday, despite strong opposition from local fishermen. Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga's cabinet plans to announce the decision as early as Tuesday next week, according to Jiji Press and public broadcaster NHK. The move would end years of debate over how to dispose of the liquid that includes water used to cool the power station after it was hit by a massive tsunami and went into meltdown in 2011.The release is expected to take years. The water has been filtered and will be diluted to meet international standards before any release, NHK said.

Japan 's new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is to dump over 1.2 million tons of radioactive Fukushima water into the ocean as a way to reduce the costs of the 0 billion nuclear plant clean up. The new Prime Minister of Japan , Yoshihide Suga, is facing additional international pressure over the weekend, amid reports that Japan will be accelerating plans to dump millions of gallons of radioactive water directly into the ocean. Reports have being widely circulated among Japan ’s leading news agency and across international media that suggest the decision has already been taken by the new Japanese

Japan ’s fisheries union says it remains opposed to the idea of dumping radioactive water accumulated at the Fukushima nuclear plant into the ocean, as top government officials signal the controversial plan will likely go ahead. Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga met with the head of the National Federation of Fisheries Co-operative Associations, Hiroshi Kishi, on Wednesday, discussing the options for disposing of the radioactive waters – described by the government as “treated” – that have accumulated in storage tanks around the nuclear power plant. The meeting was seemingly not fruitful

Water intended to be released in this operation, which should take several years, has has been filtered several times to be cleared of most of its radioactive substances (radionuclides), but not tritium, which can not be eliminated with current techniques.

"We take this decision seriously," said Tomoaki Kobayakawa, the TEPCO boss, the operator of the damaged nuclear power plant. "We will take steps to prevent harmful rumors from circulating" against agriculture, forests, fisheries and local tourism, he added.

Vive Opposition

The government "told us that it would not reject water (at sea, NDLR) without the accession of fishermen," said NHK Kanji Tachiya's public television channel, responsible for a local fishing cooperative in Fukushima, Tuesday morning before the announcement of the decision. "Now they come back on it and tell us that they will reject the water, it's incomprehensible," he added.

Understanding the plan to release treated Fukushima water

  Understanding the plan to release treated Fukushima water Japan's decision to release more than one million tonnes of treated radioactive water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea has stirred fierce controversy. Japan's government has backed a plan to dilute the processed water and release it into the sea. The government says the process meets international standards, and it has been endorsed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)."Releasing into the ocean is done elsewhere. It's not something new. There is no scandal here," IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi has said.The release is not likely to begin for at least two years and will take decades.

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said the government has put off figuring out what to do with all of the radioactive water at the now-defunct Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant for long enough. There are 15 countries still enforcing import restrictions on fish and seafood from Japanese districts affected by the plant disaster. (Related: Fish off the coast of Fukushima show high concentrations of radioactive cesium .) Government officials have been arguing over what to do with the contaminated water at the tsunami-wrecked power plant, which is expected to run out of space as

Japan plans to release into the sea more than 1m tonnes of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear station, the government said on Tuesday, a decision that is likely to anger neighbours such as South Korea. The move, more than a decade after the nuclear disaster, will deal The work to release the water will begin in about two years, the government said, and the whole process is expected to take decades. “On the premise of strict compliance with regulatory standards that have been established, we select oceanic release,” the government said in a statement after

The neighbors of Japan, with whom Tokyo maintains hearing relationships on the background of historical litigation, also manifested their dissatisfaction, China having communicated on Monday its "serious concern" and called Japan to "caution" in the elimination of the contaminated water.

South Korea has its "lively concern" concerning the Japanese decision to reject contaminated water.

Early 2020, experts commissioned by the government had recommended rejection at sea, an already existing practice in Japan and abroad on active nuclear facilities. Tritium is dangerous for human health than at very high dose, according to experts. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) also advocates for the option of dilution at sea.

The Greenpeace environmental organization has however called to continue the storage of water until the technology allows to decontaminate it completely. "The decision to reject contaminated water in the ocean will give enormous trouble for the future," said Greenpeace Monday in a statement.

with Reuters and AFP

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