Tech & Science : NASA’s about to test a safer rocket fuel for the first time ever - PressFrom - Australia
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Tech & Science NASA’s about to test a safer rocket fuel for the first time ever

05:55  12 june  2019
05:55  12 june  2019 Source:   bgr.com

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NASA first plans to send astronauts to an asteroid. The bigger device would start making enough oxygen for the return trip before astronauts ever launch The other part of rocket fuel , the propellant, can be made from light hydrogen that is brought from Earth or other chemicals mined from Martian dirt

Once in space , NASA intends to demonstrate the Green fuel in action as it propels the GPIM test vehicle pictured Higher performing fuel isn't just good news for NASA and SpaceX, it opens the door for smaller As for the STP-2 Mission, as well as demonstrating the new fuel for the first time , it

NASA’s about to test a safer rocket fuel for the first time ever© Provided by Penske Media Corporation stmd_gpim_0

The fuel that powers most spacecraft today is incredibly toxic to living organisms. That’s normally not a big issue when you’re sending something into space, but it can still pose some risks if a mishap results in a spacecraft crashing back down to Earth. It’s also a major obstacle for engineers who work closely with space-bound hardware on a daily basis.

NASA thinks it might have a fix for all of this in the form of a new, “green” fuel alternative that swaps highly toxic hydrazine with a new formulation that much safer and, as it turns out, even more powerful than modern rocket fuels.

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NASA plans to make oxygen, a key rocket fuel ingredient, on Mars early next decade. Space agency officials unveiled seven instruments they plan to put on The bigger device would start making enough oxygen for the return trip before astronauts ever launch to Mars, Hecht said. The other part of rocket

For the advertising company " FUEL ", see Rocket Fuel Inc. For the drug regimen, see California rocket fuel . Thus, the Saturn V first stage used kerosene-liquid oxygen rather than the liquid hydrogen-liquid oxygen used on its upper stages.

As NASA explains in a new blog post, the new, pinkish-colored fuel is a whole lot safer for engineers to handle. Handling the toxic hydrazine requires significant precautions, including gloves, full body suits, and even oxygen masks. The greener fuel alternative still needs to be handled with care but doesn’t require the same incredibly strict rules as its predecessor.

Related Slideshow: Provided by PocketLint

NASA’s about to test a safer rocket fuel for the first time ever

The benefit for NASA and other space groups is that the fueling process could be done earlier in the procedures leading up to a launch, not to mention cheaper. As an added bonus, the new, safer fuel is roughly 50 percent more efficient than the more toxic option, giving spacecraft more freedom to maneuver or travel greater distances with the same amount of fuel.

The first in-space test of the new fuel will come later this month when SpaceX will launch NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) satellite. The spacecraft will give NASA the ability to test the fuel and determine whether it’s a viable option for future missions. If all goes well, the new propellant could be the next standard in rocket fuel, offering increased safety and greater efficiency.

NASA astronaut captures breathtaking time-lapse of Earth from space.
Here on Earth, we see the Sun rise and set once in any given 24-hour period. If you want to see the sunrise or sunset you need to set your watch so you don't miss it, or you'll be left waiting another day for the opportunity. Things are a whole lot different on the International Space Station. Travelers spending time aboard the orbiting laboratory don’t just have to deal with the lack of gravity and somewhat cramped quarters, they also have to wrestle with the fact that normal “days” don’t really exist when you’re speeding around the Earth over a dozen times per day.

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