Tech & Science : Want to See My Genes? Get a Warrant - - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

Tech & Science Want to See My Genes? Get a Warrant

11:30  12 june  2019
11:30  12 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

Scientists edit chicken genes to make them resistant to bird flu

Scientists edit chicken genes to make them resistant to bird flu Scientists in Britain have used gene-editing techniques to stop bird flu spreading in chicken cells grown in a lab - a key step towards making genetically-altered chickens that could halt a human flu pandemic. Bird flu viruses currently spread swiftly in wild birds and poultry, and can at times jump into humans. Global health and infectious disease specialists cite as one of their greatest concerns the threat of a human flu pandemic caused by a bird flu strain that makes such a jump and mutates into a deadly and airborne form that can pass easily between people.

Someone broke into a church in Centerville, Utah, last November and attacked the organist who was practicing there. In March, after a conventional investigation came up empty, a police detective turned to forensic consultants at Parabon NanoLabs.

Get a Warrant . By Elizabeth Joh, The New York Times | 06. 11. 2019. The technique is known as genetic genealogy. It isn’t simply a matter of finding an identical genetic match between someone in a database and evidence from a crime scene.

Want to See My Genes? Get a Warrant© Joan Wong

Someone broke into a church in Centerville, Utah, last November and attacked the organist who was practicing there. In March, after a conventional investigation came up empty, a police detective turned to forensic consultants at Parabon NanoLabs. Using the publicly accessible website GEDmatch, the consultants found a likely distant genetic relative of the suspect, whose blood sample had been found near the church’s broken window.

Want to See My Genes? Get a Warrant
How To Get A Home Loan With 5% Deposit
Find out more on Finder
Ad Finder.com.au

Someone related to the person on GEDmatch did indeed live in Centerville: a 17-year-old high school student. Alerted by the police, a school resource officer watched the student during lunch at the school cafeteria and collected the milk carton and juice box he’d thrown in the garbage. The DNA on the trash was a match for the crime scene evidence. This appears to be the first time that this technique was used for an assault investigation.

Australian Federal Police raid ABC headquarters at Sydney's Ultimo

Australian Federal Police raid ABC headquarters at Sydney's Ultimo The raid on the Ultimo headquarters of the ABC comes a day after AFP officers searched the home of a News Corp journalist.

Home » Publications » Other Writing » Want to See My Genes ? Get a Warrant . The technique is known as genetic genealogy. It isn’t simply a matter of finding an identical genetic match between someone in a database and evidence from a crime scene.

Want to See My Genes ? Get a Warrant . The truth is that building owners throughout the city are doing all they can to work with tenants to help them get through this terrible economic time.

Sign Up For the Morning Briefing: Asia and Australia Newsletter

The technique is known as genetic genealogy. It isn’t simply a matter of finding an identical genetic match between someone in a database and evidence from a crime scene. Instead, a DNA profile may offer an initial clue — that a distant cousin is related to a suspect, for instance — and then an examination of birth records, family trees and newspaper clips can identify a small number of people for further investigation.

The identification of Joseph DeAngelo in the Golden State Killer case also relied on genetic genealogy. He was charged with 26 counts of murder and kidnapping after a genealogist helped investigators in California identify a third cousin of Mr. DeAngelo’s through GEDmatch and other genealogical records.

ABC chair Ita Buttrose condemns AFP raid, vows to fight attempts to 'muzzle' broadcaster

ABC chair Ita Buttrose condemns AFP raid, vows to fight attempts to 'muzzle' broadcaster ABC chair Ita Buttrose blasts the AFP raid on Australia's national broadcaster, revealing she had a "frank conversation" with the Federal Communications Minister and would "fight any attempts to muzzle" the ABC.

Want to See My Genes ? Get a Warrant . Help Times journalists uncover the next big story. Subscribe to The New York Times. See my options.

Want to See My Genes ? Get a Warrant . Which got me thinking. Maybe, as mystics would have us believe, we are, after all, connected to one another -- rather than alienated, each shivering under our own pile of blankets.

While there may be broad public support for a technique that solved serial murders, just because technology allows for a new type of investigation doesn’t mean the government should be allowed to use it in all cases.

Genetic genealogy requires lots of DNA samples and an easy way to compare them. Americans have created millions of genetic profiles already. A 2018 study published in Science predicted that 90 percent of Americans of European descent will be identifiable from their DNA within a year or two, even if they have not used a consumer DNA service. As for easy access, GEDmatch’s website provides exactly this opportunity. Consumers can take profiles generated from other commercial genetic testing services, upload them free and compare them to other profiles. So can the police.

We should be glad whenever a cold case involving a serious crimes like rape or murder can be solved. But the use of genetic genealogy in the Centerville assault case raises with new urgency fundamental questions about this technique.

Why don’t we grow to be 10 feet tall?

Why don’t we grow to be 10 feet tall? We all know the families populated by towering basketball players versus the petite households with builds best suited for, say, horse jockeying or wrestling. There’s probably a fair amount of height variation within friend groups, too: The tallest friend takes the selfies, while the shortest struggles to fit in the frame. But despite these drastic variations, humans pretty much fall within a normal height range: In the United States, healthy men are, on average, 5 feet and 9 inches tall while women are typically 5 feet and 4 inches.

Want to See My Genes ? Get a Warrant . Help Times journalists uncover the next big story. Subscribe to The New York Times. See my options. 2 articles remaining this month.

Want to See My Genes ? Get a Warrant . Help Times journalists uncover the next big story. Subscribe to The New York Times. See my options. 2 articles remaining this month.

First, there is now no downward limit on what crimes the police might investigate through genetic genealogy. If the police felt free to use it in an assault case, why not shoplifting, trespassing or littering?

Second, there’s the issue of meaningful consent. You may decide that the police should use your DNA profile without qualification and may even post your information online with that purpose in mind. But your DNA is also shared in part with your relatives. When you consent to genetic sleuthing, you are also exposing your siblings, parents, cousins, relatives you’ve never met and even future generations of your family. Legitimate consent to the government’s use of an entire family tree should involve more than just a single person clicking “yes” to a website’s terms and conditions.

Third, there’s the question of why the limits on Americans’ genetic privacy are being fashioned by private entities. The Centerville police used GEDmatch because the site owners allowed an exception to their own rules, which had permitted law enforcement access only for murder and sexual assault investigations. After user complaints, GEDmatch expanded the list of crimes that the police may investigate on its site to include assault. It also changed default options for users so that the police may not gain access to their profiles unless users affirmatively opt-in. But if your relative elects to do so, there’s no way for you to opt out of that particular decision. And what’s to stop GEDmatch from changing its policies again?

Scientists Sequenced The Genes Of Ancient Plague Bacteria That Spread The 'First Pandemic'

Scientists Sequenced The Genes Of Ancient Plague Bacteria That Spread The 'First Pandemic' Scientists have gained some insight into one of the first known calamities to visit mankind: a two century-long pandemic caused by the bacterial disease plague. 

Want to See My Genes ? Those programs want to maintain the status quo while patients' interests get lost in the political battlefield. Dr. Donna E. Shalala, the secretary of health and human services, was correct to issue an order for a new transplant system to establish a level playing field so that all

Get Grabien on the go! Get a Warrant . Jun 11, 2019 6:14 AM. Should the police be able to investigate your genetic family tree for any crime, no matter how minor?

Finally, the police usually confirm leads by collecting discarded DNA samples from a suspect. How comfortable should we be that a school resource officer hung around a high school cafeteria waiting to collect a teenager’s “abandoned” DNA?

All of these issues point to one problem: Police use of genetic genealogy is virtually unregulated. Law enforcement agencies and cooperating genetic genealogy websites are operating in a world of few limits. There are not only few rules about which crimes to investigate, but also unclear remedies in the case of mistakes, the discovery of embarrassing or intrusive information, or misuse of the information.

If these concerns sounds similar to other technology and privacy problems we’re facing, they should. Our genetic and digital identities raise similar questions of autonomy, civil liberties, and intrusion by public and private entities.

Without legal limits, genetic genealogy will become a more popular tool for the police. Rather than wait for the courts to deal with difficult and novel issues about genetic surveillance and privacy, state legislatures and attorneys general should step in and articulate guidelines on how far their law enforcement agencies should go. Congress and the Federal Trade Commission should take further steps to protect the privacy and security of consumer genetic data.

If the police are to be given unlimited access to the genetic information of your entire family tree, they should have it at the end of a public debate, not by default.


Read more

Police locate cannon during search warrant in rural NSW.
A cannon has been seized from a property in rural NSW after police executed a search warrant. © NSW Police NSW Police have discovered a cannon during a search warrant at a rural NSW property. Investigators targeting the Rebels Outlaw Motorcycle Gang attended a property on Eulalie Lane, Walmer near Dubbo yesterday. While searching the rural property, officers located a small cannon concealed in bushland outside the property. The cannon was seized and investigations are continuing.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!