•   
  •   

Tech & Science Hope for Parkinson's as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms

03:00  20 june  2019
03:00  20 june  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Alabama gov signs bill requiring child sex offenders to undergo chemical castration

Alabama gov signs bill requiring child sex offenders to undergo chemical castration Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey (R) signed a bill into law Monday night that would require the chemical castration of certain sex offenders as a condition of parole, according to AL.com. Credit Cards Are Now Offering 0% Interest Until 2020 Find out more on Finder Ad Finder.com.au The bill, passed by the state legislature last week, requires male offenders whose offense involved a child under the 13 to "undergo chemical castration treatment in addition to any other penalty or condition prescribed by law.

Hope for Parkinson ' s as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms . Damage to serotonin was seen on brain imaging making it an 'excellent marker'. Study participants had a genetic predisposition without yet showing

Parkinson ' s is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder - falling only behind Alzheimer's, according to the NHS. It affects 148,000 people in the Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ' s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms , a

An early warning signal for Parkinson's which appears years before any symptoms occur has been uncovered by scientists.

Researchers from King's College London found damage to the brain's serotonin system was an 'excellent marker' for the cruel disease.

Experts have hailed the findings, branding them 'fascinating' and saying they help to fit a 'crucial gap' in the knowledge of the condition.

Parkinson's takes hold in the brain years before patients notice symptoms, which include tremors and slow movement.

Identifying the incurable disorder earlier could improve outcomes for millions of patients and halt the progression.

Medicinal cannabis trial begins for Australian veterans with PTSD

Medicinal cannabis trial begins for Australian veterans with PTSD An Australian-first trial using medicinal cannabis to treat returned servicemen and women suffering from PTSD is launched, targeting defence personnel who have not responded to conventional treatments.

Hope for Parkinson ' s as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms . Damage to serotonin production was seen on brain imaging.

@PolitisNIG. The Neurodegeneration Imaging Group (NIG), directed by Professor Marios Politis. Part of @KingsIoPPN @KingsCollegeLon. a story entitled "# Hope for # Parkinson ' s as # scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the # brain YEARS before # patients show any of the traditional

Parkinson's is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder - falling only behind Alzheimer's, according to the NHS.

It affects 148,000 people in the UK - which is around one in 350 of the population - and around half a million in the US.

Hope for Parkinson's as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Researchers from King's College London discovered that damage to the brain's serotonin system was an 'excellent marker' for the cruel long-term disease. Pictured, brain imaging showing loss in serotonin function as the disease progresses. The red and yellow areas show that serotonin function reduces before movement symptoms develop Hope for Parkinson's as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Brain imaging showing loss in serotonin function where blue and black areas reduce. The incurable long-term disease takes hold in the brain years before patients notice symptoms

Heather Wilson was the lead researcher of the study. She is based at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience.

Why Do We Yawn? Contagious Yawns Help Cool Down the Brain, Scientists Say

Why Do We Yawn? Contagious Yawns Help Cool Down the Brain, Scientists Say The temperature of the brain can change for a variety of reasons, including stress and sleep patterns.

Some of the media coverage is a little optimistic. For example, the Mail Online claims that the research represents " Hope for Parkinson ' s as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any traditional symptoms ." This doesn't recognise the very limited

Hope for Parkinson ' s as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms . Damage to serotonin production was seen on brain imaging. King's College London said it was an 'excellent marker' for the disease which

Hope for Parkinson's as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms
How To Get A Home Loan With 5% Deposit
Find out more on Finder
Ad Finder.com.au

She said: 'We found serotonin function was an excellent marker for how advanced Parkinson's disease has become.

'Crucially, we found detectable changes to the serotonin system among patients who were not yet diagnosed.

'Therefore, brain imaging of the serotonin system could become a valuable tool to detect individuals at risk for Parkinson's disease, monitor their progression and help with the development of new treatments.'

Patients who have Parkinson's disease have build-ups of the protein α-synuclein in their brain.

While there is no clear cause for most people - environmental factors could play a role - a minority of cases are caused by genetic mutations.

Mutations in the α-synuclein (SNCA) gene are rare - but patients who have them are almost certain to develop Parkinson's during their lifetime.

New AI Searches Google Street View For Street Signs That Need Repairs

New AI Searches Google Street View For Street Signs That Need Repairs Take a moment to think about all the street signs that blur past as you’re driving. Stop signs, speed limits, and traffic warnings all add up to a massive amount of infrastructure for a city that’s challenging and costly to maintain. 

Scientists say they have identified the earliest signs of Parkinson ' s disease in the brain , 15 to 20 years before symptoms appear. A study has found an early sign of Parkinson ’ s disease in the brain Photo: Yui Mok/ PA. Scientists may have discovered the earliest warning signs A further 65

Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ’ s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms , a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people. Parkinson ’ s , a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and

This makes them an ideal group for studying the train of biological events that leads to Parkinson's.

WHAT IS SEROTONIN AND WHAT DOES IT DO?

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine, is a neurotransmitter - a chemical substance that transmits nerve impulses across the space between nerve cells or neurons - known as a synapse.

It plays an important part in the regulation of learning, mood, sleep and helps control blood vessels.

It has also been linked to anxiety, migraine, vomiting and appetite.

Serotonin is the chemical which can help with feelings of low self-esteem as well as a sense of not belonging.

As a neurotransmitter, once the first molecule makes its way across the synapse, the cell stops accepting any further chemicals or signals.

Once the process is completed, the remaining serotonin is reabsorbed into the original neuron.

Chemicals and tablets, such as Prozac, tackle depression by stopping the cell from shutting off and not accepting any more serotonin.

By keeping the avenues open for more of the neurotransmitter to pass through, it increases the strength and duration of the signal.

Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain

Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people. 

Video: Hope for Parkinson ' s as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms .

The Georgetown scientists ' research could provide a ray of hope for these people if the proteins causing nerve damage can be stopped. When the protein was blocked in the brains of mice, Lewy bodies were cleared and did not build up again, cell death was prevented, and their mobility was better.

This, at least theoretically, increases happiness.

The SNCA genetic mutation was first found in villages in the northern Peloponnese in Greece and can also be found in people who migrated to nearby regions in Italy.

Scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) discovered the mutated gene in 1997 by studying the families' DNA.

King's College identified 14 carriers and flew them from Greece and Italy to London over the course of two years.

Seven of them had not yet started to show any symptoms of Parkinson's, according to the researchers.

The academics put the genetic mutation carriers through a special type of brain scan that images the chemical messenger serotonin in the brain.

The test data was then compared with the results of 65 patients with non-genetic Parkinson's and 25 healthy volunteers.

The findings found that the serotonin system starts to malfunction in people with Parkinson's well before symptoms affecting movement occur.

Published in The Lancet Neurology, the study is the first time Parkinson's earliest stages have been linked with serotonin.

And it challenges other studies that suggest changes in the dopamine system occur before anything else.

Professor Marios Politis, study co-author, said: 'Parkinson's disease has traditionally been thought of as occurring due to damage in the dopamine system.

Wimbledon wild card with genetic disorder has 'no limits'

Wimbledon wild card with genetic disorder has 'no limits' Of all the players bidding to make the Wimbledon main draw this year, Fran Jones is almost certainly the most inspirational. She has earned a wildcard for the qualifying tournament despite having just six fingers and seven toes. A rare genetic disorder, Ectrodactyly Ectodermal Dysplasia - more commonly known as EEC, affects the way she grips her racket and balance, but not her determination to reach the top. Jones was born with the condition. "I've got thee toes on my right foot, four on my left. I was born with a cleft palate and have four fingers on each hand," she said. "I have less teeth than most people.

The results, published in The Lancet Neurology, challenge the traditional Parkinson ' s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder , after Alzheimer's disease. Half of the participants had not begun to show any symptoms of Parkinson ' s . Data from the 14 people with

Changes in the brain that can be spotted years before physical symptoms of Parkinson ’ s disease occur might act as an early warning sign for the condition Those developments could be some way off though, some scientists have said. Most of the time Parkinson ’ s appears to have no known

'But we show that changes to the serotonin system come first, occurring many years before patients begin to show symptoms.'

Tom Foltynie, professor of neurology at UCL, who was not involved in the study, said: 'This is a fascinating finding.

'At the moment, we are using the clinical symptoms (loss of sense of smell, among others) as the first clues regarding the clinical onset of Parkinson's.'

It's hoped the findings will lead to new screening tools for identifying people at greatest risk.

But the brain imaging carried out using PET scans are expensive and difficult to carry out.

The researchers said further research on scanning techniques was needed to make them more affordable and straightforward for use as screening tools.

Dr Beckie Port, research manager at Parkinson’s UK, said: 'This is one of the first studies to suggest that changes in serotonin signalling may be an early consequence of Parkinson’s.

'Detecting changes that are happening in the brain in these early stages is a crucial gap in Parkinson’s research at the moment.'

Read more

Wimbledon wild card with genetic disorder has 'no limits'.
Of all the players bidding to make the Wimbledon main draw this year, Fran Jones is almost certainly the most inspirational. She has earned a wildcard for the qualifying tournament despite having just six fingers and seven toes. A rare genetic disorder, Ectrodactyly Ectodermal Dysplasia - more commonly known as EEC, affects the way she grips her racket and balance, but not her determination to reach the top. Jones was born with the condition. "I've got thee toes on my right foot, four on my left. I was born with a cleft palate and have four fingers on each hand," she said. "I have less teeth than most people.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!