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Tech & Science Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain

20:05  20 june  2019
20:05  20 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

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of Parkinson ' s in brain Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ' s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery - Treatment of symptoms of Parkinson ' s Disease Symptoms - Продолжительность: 6:20 The Neuro

Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ’ s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people. Parkinson ’ s , a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive

Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain© PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU Parkinson's, a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive problems, is estimated to effect up to 10 million people worldwide

Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people.

Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain© Adrian Leung/John Saeki Factfile on Parkinson's disease.

Parkinson's, a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive problems, is estimated to effect up to 10 million people worldwide.

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Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ' s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a Parkinson ' s , a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive problems, is estimated to affect up to 10 million people worldwide.

Scientists said on Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ' s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people. Parkinson ' s , a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and

It is diagnosed by a build-up in the brain of a specific protein, a-synuclein, the cause of which is unclear.

However some people are born with a genetic mutation that makes them almost certain to develop the disease at some stage in their life.

Hope for Parkinson's as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms

Hope for Parkinson's as scientists spot signs of the cruel disorder in the brain YEARS before patients show any of the traditional symptoms Damage to serotonin production was seen on brain imaging. King's College London said it was an 'excellent marker' for the disease which takes hold of the brain years before symptoms show.

Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson ' s disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery They found that changes in the serotonin system in the brains of Parkinson ' s sufferers started to malfunction well before other symptoms occurred.

There are no cures for Parkinson ’ s disease, but symptoms are treated with drugs that restore a brain chemical called dopamine to normal levels. We also need more research into genetic forms of Parkinson ’ s which could further unlock the earliest changes underlying this awful disease.

Researchers from King's College London compared data from 14 individuals carrying the mutation with that of 65 non-genetic Parkinson's patients and 25 healthy volunteers.

They found that changes in the serotonin system in the brains of Parkinson's sufferers started to malfunction well before other symptoms occurred.

"We found that serotonin function was an excellent marker for how advanced Parkinson's disease has become," said Heather Wilson, from the university's Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience.

"Therefore, brain imaging of the serotonin system could become a valuable tool to detect individuals at risk of Parkinson's diseases, monitor their progression and help with the development of new treatments."

Suspected causes of the disease before the study included levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine, and there is growing evidence of a possible link between Parkinson's and gut function, though this is poorly understood.

"Picking up on the condition earlier and being able to monitor its progression would aid the discovery of new and better treatments that could slow the loss of brain cells in Parkinson's," said Beckie Port, research manager at Parkinson's UK, who was not involved in the study.

"Further research is needed to fully understand the importance of this discovery, but if it is able to unlock a tool to measure and monitor how Parkinson's develops, it could change countless lives."

The research was published in The Lancet Neurology.

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