Tech & Science : Astronomers Just Got Closer to Unravelling The Mystery of 'Glitching' Pulsars - PressFrom - Australia
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Tech & Science Astronomers Just Got Closer to Unravelling The Mystery of 'Glitching' Pulsars

17:17  13 august  2019
17:17  13 august  2019 Source:   sciencealert.com

Astronomers Just Got Closer to Unravelling The Mystery of 'Glitching' Pulsars

Astronomers Just Got Closer to Unravelling The Mystery of 'Glitching' Pulsars A peculiar hiccup in the rotation speed of a dead star has turned out to be even more interesting than we thought. For the first time, astronomers have shown that the rotation of the Vela pulsar slowed down immediately before its 2016 glitch. 

For astronomers , some of the most useful objects in the Universe are rapidly rotating neutron stars known as pulsars . As they rotate, they flash out a beam of radiation It's not conclusive proof that this is indeed what's happening inside neutron stars, but it does bring us a little closer to narrowing it down.

Astronomers catch a pulsar ' glitching ,' offering insights into the strange stars. Pulsars usually spin with clockwork precision, but sometimes they glitch in a strange sort of stellar hiccup. And astronomers just caught Vela pulsar in the act.

Astronomers Just Got Closer to Unravelling The Mystery of 'Glitching' Pulsars© Judy Schmidt/Flickr/CC BY 2.0

A peculiar hiccup in the rotation speed of a dead star has turned out to be even more interesting than we thought. For the first time, astronomers have shown that the rotation of the Vela pulsar slowed down immediately before its 2016 glitch.

Not only was this completely unexpected, it could help us narrow down the mysterious dynamics in the ultradense interiors of neutron stars.

For astronomers, some of the most useful objects in the Universe are rapidly rotating neutron stars known as pulsars. As they rotate, they flash out a beam of radiation like a lighthouse, often on incredibly fast and regular timescales.

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And astronomers just caught Vela pulsar in the act. Astronomers catch a pulsar ' glitching ,' offering insights into the strange stars. Pulsars usually spin with clockwork precision, but sometimes they glitch in a strange sort of stellar hiccup.

And speculate astronomers did, considering mechanisms for the brightness variations that ranged from transiting planets to an “alien megastructure” encircling Catching those dips as they occurred was the key to unlocking this star’s mystery . “We were hoping that once we finally caught a dip happening in

This can be useful for a whole range of science applications, but even pulsars aren't 100 percent precise. Over time, they gradually lose a small amount of rotational energy, ever-so-slightly slowing down. Every now and again however, they can suddenly speed up before returning to normal - that's what we call a glitch.

We don't know what causes pulsar glitching, but astronomers believe it has something to do with the neutron star's internal processes.

And this is where the Vela pulsar, located around 1,000 light-years from Earth, comes in. It normally spins at a rate of about 11 rotations per second. But it's also a well-known serial glitcher, hiccuping once every three years or so. (Its most recent glitch was in February of this year, but this research concerns the previous glitch, in December 2016.)

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And astronomers just caught Vela pulsar in the act. The Vela pulsar is known to glitch something like once every three years, when it speeds up for a few seconds. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Toronto/M.Durant et al; Optical: DSS/Davide De Martin).

These glitches can't be predicted, but their relative regularity means we have a better chance of catching one in the act, which is what happened in December 2016, when, for the first time, the glitch was recorded in real time using a radio telescope.

The first analysis of that glitch revealed changes in the pulse shape during the glitch event. Now a deeper analysis has revealed that, during the glitch, the pulsar starting spinning even faster - what is known as a rotational-frequency overshoot - and then relaxed back down to a more normal speed pretty quickly.

This is consistent with theoretical models that suggest there are three components to the internal structure of a neutron star.

"One of these components, a soup of superfluid neutrons in the inner layer of the crust, moves outwards first and hits the rigid outer crust of the star, causing it to spin up," said astrophysicist Paul Lasky of Monash University in Australia.

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"It indicates that the pulsar environment is changing, but just what those changes entail is open to debate." Recent observations of these odd pulsars suggest that their rotational slow-down rate when OFF is only 80 percent of the rate when ON. Get weekly and/or daily updates delivered to your inbox.

"But then, a second soup of superfluid that moves in the core catches up to the first causing the spin of the star to slow back down. This overshoot has been predicted a couple of times in the literature, but this is the first real time it's been identified in observations."

It's not conclusive proof that this is indeed what's happening inside neutron stars, but it does bring us a little closer to narrowing it down.

That slowdown we mentioned earlier, though, still defies explanation. The researchers noted in their paper that the slowdown may actually trigger the glitch by causing a critical lag between the crust and the crustal superfluid, but there's still a giant question mark hanging over it.

"Immediately before the glitch, we noticed that the star seems to slow down its rotation rate before spinning back up," said astronomer and physicist Greg Ashton of Monash University.

"We actually have no idea why this is, and it's the first time it's ever been seen."

But, while the mystery remains, the analysis does show that the glitch is a bit more complex than a short, single-step process. The team hopes that future observations, analysis and theoretical modelling will come up with new explanations for the dynamics they have revealed.

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