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Tech & Science Scientists stunned after spotting record-shattering supernova

05:45  17 august  2019
05:45  17 august  2019 Source:   bgr.com

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15 in the journal Science , space researchers reported having spotted from across the universe a record - shattering supernova or star explosion that is 570 Dong explained that it would take some 90 billion years for our own sun to match the energy produced by the record-breaking supernova .

Scientists may have just spotted the most powerful supernova ever seen, some 3.8 billion light years away in deep space. An artist's impression of the record -breakingly powerful, superluminous supernova ASASSN- 15lh as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years

Scientists stunned after spotting record-shattering supernova© Provided by Penske Media Corporation space

Scientists have a pretty good handle on the life cycle of various stars. They know the types of stars that are likely to die in fiery supernova blasts, and they know that not all supernova are created equal. Still, space has many untold secrets, and a new study published in The Astrophysical Journal reveals that scientists had their understanding of supernova thrown into question after observing an explosion so massive that they initially thought their instruments had broken.

The explosion in question, called SN2016iet, was first spotted back in 2016, but it took a further three years for astronomers to truly understand what they were seeing.

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Scientists may have spotted the most powerful supernova ever seen, some 3.8 billion light years away in deep space. Named ASASSN-15lh, it looks like a huge ball of hot gas and is radiating the energy of hundreds of billions of Suns. Ten miles across at its center

Record - shattering super supernova . Posted by Deborah Byrd in Science Wire | Space Scientists are frankly at a loss, though, regarding what sorts of stars and stellar scenarios might be Bottom line: ASASSN-15lh is considered to be a superluminous supernova , first spotted in June, 2015.

“When we first realized how thoroughly unusual SN2016iet is my reaction was ‘whoa – did something go horribly wrong with our data?'” Harvard grad Sebastian Gomez, lead author of the paper, said in a statement. “After a while, we determined that SN2016iet is an incredible mystery, located in a previously uncatalogued galaxy one billion light years from Earth.”

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Supernovae are nothing new in the universe, but scientists have spotted the largest yet seen, some 200 times as bright as anything recorded previously. Spectral outputs from the explosion revealed materials signatures that have never been spotted before in a supernova . The supernova was much

The known history of supernova observation goes back to 185 AD, when supernova SN 185 appeared, the oldest appearance of a supernova recorded by humankind.

Working backwards from what they could see of the star’s current state, the team determined that the blast was created by a star 200 times as massive as our own Sun. Researchers believe it shed a whopping 85 percent of its mass during its brief existence which ultimately ended in a colossal detonation. The huge amount of material the star shed, along with the supernova explosion itself, produced a sight that left scientists scratching their heads for years.

“Everything about this supernova looks different—its change in brightness with time, its spectrum, the galaxy it is located in, and even where it’s located within its galaxy,” Professor Dr. Edo Berger explains. “We sometimes see supernovas that are unusual in one respect, but otherwise are normal; this one is unique in every possible way.”

Going forward, the team plans to continue to observe SN2016iet and, hopefully, learn more about its past and future. This will be made easier by the fact that the explosion was incredibly bright, and located in a bare area of the sky, so there may still be more it can teach us.

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