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Tech & Science China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space

04:25  11 september  2019
04:25  11 september  2019 Source:   bgr.com

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Every once in a while, radio telescopes on Earth detect powerful signals from unknown sources. These Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs for short) are often This particular event was especially significant because no other telescope on Earth has ever detected so many repetitions of the signal in such a

The world' s largest radio telescope has received its first signals from space and is now entering an intensive testing phase. The radio telescope , located in a vast natural crater in Guizhou Province in southwest China , has been an ambitious project for the National Astronomical Observatories of China .

China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space © Provided by Penske Media Corporation space

China spent five years and close to $200 million to build its Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, nicknamed FAST.

It was a monumental undertaking, but the result is a true marvel of technology, and it’s the largest full radio telescope on Earth.

Now, with China set for a final review of the completed project later this month, scientists say they’ve already used the telescope to detect a notoriously strange radio signal beaming through space.

Every once in a while, radio telescopes on Earth detect powerful signals from unknown sources.

These Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs for short) are often singular flashes, but a few of them have been observed repeating at seemingly random intervals.

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The radio telescope will also probe objects such as pulsars, which Boyle described as 'balls of star stuff that are so tightly packed together that a teaspoonful 'As you're surveying the sky, particularly over wide areas of sky looking for objects, you are also increasing the search volume for signals from

9 (Xinhua) -- Chinese astronomers have detected repeated fast radio bursts (FRB) - mysterious signals believed to be from a source about 3 billion light years from Earth - with the largest and most sensitive radio telescope ever built. Scientists detected the signals with the Five-hundred-meter

One particular signal, known as FRB 121102, is notorious for popping up again and again, and China’s shiny new telescope heard it loud and clear.

Nobody really knows what creates FRBs, and that’s part of what makes them so exciting for scientists.

The fact that most of them are one-off bursts, but that others like FRB 121102 continues to repeat makes the process that drives them even more mysterious.

“Once we pass this review, FAST becomes an accepted telescope for exploring the Universe,” Jiang Peng, chief engineer of FAST, said in a statement.

“Fast has been open to Chinese astronomers since April 2019. After the National Construction Acceptance, it will be open to astronomers across the world.”

The science team using FAST detected FRB 121102’s telltale signals on August 29th, hearing “more than a few dozen bursts” of the signal.

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Related: china built the largest telescope in the world but can't find FAST is especially adept at capturing radio signals due to a highly sensitive fast radio burst backend on a "I just think it is so amazing that nature produces something like that," physicist Ziggy Pleunis of McGill

China ' s largest telescope has detected more than 100 mysterious radio pulses coming from a source around three billion light years from the Earth. The strange signals are so-called fast radio bursts — rapid pulses of energy that come from unknown but high-energy sources out in space .

This particular event was especially significant because no other telescope on Earth has ever detected so many repetitions of the signal in such a short period of time, suggesting that the incredible power of China’s new telescope could help unlock the signal’s secrets.

Going forward, FAST will have its hands full, with researchers hoping to use it in the ongoing search for distant pulsars, elements like hydrogen, and of course additional Fast Radio Bursts.

Pictures: Coolest space discoveries

China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
China’s colossal radio telescope just heard a bizarre signal in space
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