Tech & Science : Passport facial checks fail to work with dark skin - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

Tech & Science Passport facial checks fail to work with dark skin

06:35  10 october  2019
06:35  10 october  2019 Source:   bbc.com

Public warned not to approach men wanted over Mandurah assault

  Public warned not to approach men wanted over Mandurah assault Leon Desmond Williams, 26, Matthew John Parker, 26 and Christopher Anthony Parker, 22, are all wanted over the Mandurah incident. Police would like to speak to Leon Desmond Williams, 26, Matthew John Parker, 26 and Christopher Anthony Parker, 22, who they believe can provide information about the Mandurah incident.

When it launched a new passport checking service, the Home Office knew that it had trouble handling some shades of skin , a report in the New Scientist has revealed. The facial recognition technology failed to recognise the features of some people with very light or dark skin .

When it launched a new passport checking service, the Home Office knew that it had trouble handling some shades of skin , a report in the New Scientist has revealed. The facial recognition technology failed to recognise the features of some people with very light or dark skin .

a close up of a person wearing a mask© Getty Images

When it launched a new passport checking service, the Home Office knew that it had trouble handling some shades of skin, a report in the New Scientist has revealed.

The facial recognition technology failed to recognise the features of some people with very light or dark skin.

The problem had become apparent during trials of the service.

The government says that users can override the automated check if needed.

Facial recognition maps a person's features from a computer-scanned image or live feed.

The results are then compared against a database containing previously created facial maps to find a match.

Skin doctor Elamurugan Arumugam found not guilty of sexual assault on patients

  Skin doctor Elamurugan Arumugam found not guilty of sexual assault on patients A skin cancer specialist and plastic surgeon is acquitted of sexually assaulting three women during medical examinations. Rockhampton doctor Elamurugan Arumugam was found not guilty of five charges after being accused of touching patients inappropriately on the breast during skin checks from 2012. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

The UK government deployed its passport photo checking system despite knowing the technology had problems identifying people with very dark User research was carried out with a wide range of ethnic groups and did identify that people with very light or very dark skin found it difficult to provide

The UK government went ahead with a face-detection system for its passport photo checking service, despite knowing the technology failed to work well for people in some ethnic minorities. Face recognition technology has a record of failing to recognise people with certain skin tones.

Documents released as a part of a freedom of information (FOI) request acknowledge that the Home Office knew its system had trouble mapping the faces of some ethnic minorities.

It was aware of the problem but decided to launch the service regardless.

"User research was carried out with a wide range of ethnic groups and did identify that people with very light or very dark skin found it difficult to provide an acceptable passport photograph," the FOI response stated.

"However, the overall performance was judged sufficient to deploy."

The Home Office told the BBC it wanted the process of uploading a passport application photo to be simple. It added it would try and improve the system.

This is not the first time the Passport Office's use facial recognition has been known to be problematic.

The photograph of a young black man was recently rejected because it mistook his lips for an open mouth, according to the Evening Standard.

As a result, Joshua Bada was told his application had been rejected because he needed to provide a plain expression and a closed mouth - something he had in fact done.

Copycat coders create 'vulnerable' apps .
Developers who copy code rather than write it themselves leave apps open to attack, a study warns.A team of computer scientists looked at more than 72,000 chunks of code found on the Stack Overflow website.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!