•   
  •   

Tech & Science NASA InSight lander 'mole' suffers another Mars misfortune

12:26  28 october  2019
12:26  28 october  2019 Source:   cnet.com

New Satellite Pics Show Curiosity and InSight Hard at Work on Mars

  New Satellite Pics Show Curiosity and InSight Hard at Work on Mars New images taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter are providing fresh views of NASA’s Insight lander and Curiosity rover on the Martian surface. The Opportunity rover died last year after being smothered by dust, which means NASA has just two robotic probes currently investigating the Martian surface: the six-wheeled Curiosity rover and the immobile InSight lander. Flying high above in space, however, is NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which regularly scans the Martian surface in search of cool new things, like dried-up river channels, fresh impact craters, and the occasional, ahem, elephant.

" Mars continues to surprise us," the NASA InSight team wrote. "While digging this weekend the mole backed about halfway out of the ground." NASA said preliminary assessment suggests "unexpected soil properties" are to blame for this bizarre behavior. The probe was supposed to burrow its way down to

The burrowing heat probe onboard NASA 's InSight Mars lander , affectionately known as "the mole ," was designed to hammer itself at least 10 feet (3 But new photos suggest that the mole might be stuck in its new spot just beneath the surface. Mars InSight in photos: NASA 's mission to probe core

a close up of an umbrella: InSight snapped this selfie on Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. InSight snapped this selfie on Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Mars is a planet. It doesn't have feelings or intentions, but it's hard not to personify it when it seems to be fighting back against our attempts to study it.

NASA's InSight lander has been struggling to send a heat probe beneath the planet's surface. Just when it seemed to be making progress, Mars rejected it.

The InSight team tweeted a GIF on Sunday showing the Heat and Physical Properties Package (HP3) probe popping back up out of the Mars soil from where it had partially buried itself. HP3 is better known by its "mole" nickname.

Earth-like planets may be 'common' throughout the universe: Scientists spot signs of rusting iron on space rocks which point to worlds with the ingredients for life

  Earth-like planets may be 'common' throughout the universe: Scientists spot signs of rusting iron on space rocks which point to worlds with the ingredients for life Researchers from the University of California in Los Angeles studied the chemical make-up of space rocks and examined NASA telescope data to find promising signs of more planets like Earth.Researchers who have studied the chemistry of space rocks from other galaxies say the conditions for life on Earth are not unique.

NASA 's Mars InSight Lander to Push on Top of the ' Mole '. A new understanding of Mars is beginning to emerge, thanks to the first year of NASA 's InSight lander mission. Findings described in a set of six papers published today reveal a planet alive with quakes, dust devils and strange magnetic

InSight is a Mars lander designed to give the Red Planet its first thorough checkup since it formed 4.5 billion • InSight — Studying the 'Inner Space ' of Mars . InSight , short for Interior Exploration using This was the first test of miniaturized CubeSat technology at another planet, which researchers hope

"Mars continues to surprise us," the NASA InSight team wrote. "While digging this weekend the mole backed about halfway out of the ground." NASA said preliminary assessment suggests "unexpected soil properties" are to blame for this bizarre behavior.

The probe was supposed to burrow its way down to a depth of 16 feet (5 meters) to take the temperature of Mars from the inside. It's all part of the mission's purpose to study how rocky planets (like Mars and Earth) are formed.

The mole got stuck shortly after its initial deployment in February. Recent efforts to use the lander's robotic arm to help it along seemed to be working until this latest setback.

The German Aerospace Center (DLR) designed the heat probe. NASA associate administrator Thomas Zurbuchen took to Twitter to say engineers are now analyzing the data to try to figure out what happened. We expect to know more sometime this week.

Astronauts say all-female spacewalk a sign of the times

  Astronauts say all-female spacewalk a sign of the times Historic spacewalk shows increasing diversity at NASA and across the science and technology world"For me, since it was my first spacewalk in general, it was an overwhelming and incredible feeling," Meir said in space-to-ground news conference. "The fact that I did it with another woman, and actually with my close friend and colleague Christina, really made it even more special.

InSight Prepares to Push on the Mole : NASA InSight recently moved its robotic arm closer to its digging device, called the " mole ," in preparation to The mission team plans to command the scoop on InSight 's robotic arm to press down on the " mole ," the mini pile driver designed to hammer itself as

NASA may have a multi-billion dollar budget and some of the most advanced technology in the world, but when the Mars InSight lander got into a spot of bother, scientists came up with a charmingly A bit of good news from # Mars : our new approach of using the robotic arm to push the mole appears to

"One possibility observed in testing on Earth is that soil could fall in front of the mole's tip as it rebounds, gradually filling the hole in front of it as the mole backs out," the InSight team said in a follow-up tweet.

Related Slideshow: Fascinating photos of Mars (Provided by Photo Services)

It will be a disappointment if the mole doesn't succeed, but the rest of InSight's work is going gangbusters. The lander, which touched down in November 2018, has taken a selfie, picked up on marsquakes, listened to the wind and even won an Emmy. That's an impressive list of accomplishments for a young mission.

NASA to livestream key Boeing Starliner spaceship test .
We'll get to see one of the spacecraft NASA hopes to use to send astronauts to orbit fly on Monday.Put another way, should there be risk of an explosion or something else really bad happening on the launch pad, the abort system being tested Monday is essentially the crew's life raft. During the test, the engines should carry the empty spacecraft about one mile into the air and a mile north of the test stand before parachutes and landing airbags are deployed for a soft touch down.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!