•   
  •   

Tech & Science Google is buying Fitbit: now what?

05:41  02 november  2019
05:41  02 november  2019 Source:   theverge.com

Google is making a fundamental change to its search engine, calling the update 'perhaps one of the biggest since the beginning'

  Google is making a fundamental change to its search engine, calling the update 'perhaps one of the biggest since the beginning' Google is deploying "perhaps one of the biggest" updates since its Search service was launched. The update will let Google Search better understand your questions, which the company said it didn't always understand all too well. Google used to ditch some of the words in your searches, but the update powered by machine learning will take all your words into consideration and make sense of them. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Google is deploying a massive update to Search - the company's core, original product - to make it more useful and show more relevant results.

Google is buying Fitbit and the reasons why are both simple and complicated. It’s the kind of big acquisition Google has done before (more money than My Twitter replies are currently filled with Fitbit customers promising to go buy Apple Watches right now . Whatever happens in the immediate

Fitbit is now to be part of Google ’s range of companies. After days of rumors and reports, Fitbit has been acquired by Google for . 1 billion. Right now most of my work away from Forbes appears in the Independent, the Evening Standard and Monocle Magazine.

a cellphone sitting on a table© Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Google is buying Fitbit and the reasons why are both simple and complicated. It’s the kind of big acquisition Google has done before (more money than YouTube, less than Nest or DoubleClick), but this one seems to have struck a particular nerve. My Twitter replies are currently filled with Fitbit customers promising to go buy Apple Watches right now. Whatever happens in the immediate aftermath, Google is going to have a big new team, a big new set of wary users, and a lot of big organizational issues to figure out.

In the short term, Google is clearly aware that Fitbit customers are going to be a little spooked. The company was sure to note that it will give those users “the choice to review, move, or delete their data” in the announcement post. Whether that will calm everybody down is a different matter.

Google's new Pixel 4 is a solid phone, but it's not worth $800

  Google's new Pixel 4 is a solid phone, but it's not worth $800 Google's new Pixel 4 is available to buy starting on Thursday. The Pixel 4 takes great photos, but it's lacking an ultra-wide camera lens, which makes it less versatile than its competition, like the AppleiPhone 11 and SamsungGalaxy S10e. It comes with a smooth 90Hz screen and good specs that makes for a fast and fluid experience while using the phone. At the same time, the Pixel 4 is lacking in other key ways that people care about, like design and battery life. Google's Pixel 4 is certainly worth considering, but I'd take a good, long look at the $US600 OnePlus 7T before hitting the "buy" button.

Google is buying fitness tracking company Fitbit in a . 1 billion deal. Here's why. But Google already has plenty of hardware and software chops. What else does it get out of the Fitbit deal? The most obvious potential lure is the health data of millions of Fitbit customers.

Fitbit also brings numbers. Craig-Hallum analysts commented on the news, "We believe Google is a natural fit. The deep health and fitness data The next phase of Fitbit 's life is sure to be interesting with Google in the driver's seat. And the media is likely to cover every nuanced development in great

But let’s start by answering the big, seemingly simple question: why did Google want to buy Fitbit?

How to find and track flights using Google Flights to get the best deal on your next flight

  How to find and track flights using Google Flights to get the best deal on your next flight Hackers around the world, often teenagers, are making thousands by creating and selling games cheats to a growing market. The most recent survey suggests that around a third of gamers admit to using them to improve their chances online. Cyber-security reporter Joe Tidy went to play a game with a cheat hacker to find out how the 17-year-old makes thousands of dollars a month through his underground business. Last week, in China, four alleged hackers were arrested for similar offences. Cyber-security reporter: Joe Tidy Video journalist: Harriet Bradshaw Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog

Just days after it was reported that Google was close to buying Fitbit , Google and Fitbit today confirmed the purchase: Google will pay .35 per share for the wearables company in an all-cash deal that values Fitbit at . 1 billion. Relatively speaking, this is a great landing for Fitbit .

Google announcing that it has bought Fitbit (pending approval by the right regulatory agencies) leaves us with plenty of questions about how the two companies will operate, or even if Fitbit still remains as more than a brand name. But for many of us the biggest question is what happens to all

Why did Google want to buy Fitbit?

It’s easy to overthink this one. In fact, I engaged in that kind of overthinking on Tuesday when the acquisition was only a rumor. The general reasoning is this: Google has a serious hole when it comes to wearables and it hasn’t been able to develop its own way out of it, so it needs to buy its way out. Fitbit is the best (some might say the only) available company that could fit the bill.

In short, Google wants to build smartwatch and fitness band hardware and Fitbit helps them do that more quickly. Badda bing, badda boom.

Simple, but not that simple. Is Google buying Fitbit to try to shore up Wear OS’s many issues? What could Fitbit provide that Wear OS really needs? You can spin yourself ‘round the bend worrying about it — and eventually Google will have to do just that. But in the short term, I think Google’s reasoning really is what it says: hardware chief Rick Osterloh wants to be able to make wearables inside Google’s hardware division, so he bought himself a wearables hardware company for $2.1 billion.

Google keeps a staggering amount of information about you. Here's how to download and manage your Google data

  Google keeps a staggering amount of information about you. Here's how to download and manage your Google data Every search you perform, every video you watch, every route you drive, everything you buy, your income, your gender, your age, your voice, your face, and more.As a spate of data leaks and privacy violations continues to weaken the public's trust in big tech companies, Google has responded by creating a privacy hub that lets you access, delete and limit the data Google collects on you. Navigating all the various settings can get confusing, however, and it's not always clear what you're giving Google permission to do.

Google is reportedly looking to buy Fitbit as a way to bolster its wearables strategy. Trying to suss out what this could mean for Google , its Wear OS I could just as easily be convinced that Google ’s original bet could have led to good smartwatches in the same way that it led to good Android phones.

“The deal to buy Fitbit should give Google a much bigger presence in wearables, a significant amount of user data in the health & fitness category, and a better foundation to better With the S&P 500 near all-time highs, I wouldn’t argue with the idea that now is not the best time to be buying GOOGL stock.

(As an aside: Google’s recent $40 million Fossil acquisition didn’t end up going into Google’s hardware vision, it was put under Hiroshi Lockheimer — who runs Android, but also Chrome OS and a dozen other software products.)

Rick Osterloh knows a thing or two about Google mucking up a big consumer electronics acquisition

Google, like all tech giants, has bought a lot of companies. But unlike other tech giants, Google has had some high-profile acquisition fiascos. In fact, Rick Osterloh himself was collateral damage in one of the early messes: Google bought Motorola, squandered every opportunity it had with it, and eventually spun the whole thing off to Lenovo. Osterloh was the president of Motorola and lived through that mess — only to come back years later to lead Google’s newly unified hardware division.

So Osterloh knows a thing or two about Google mucking up a big consumer electronics acquisition. That might be why things seem to be going so smoothly with the HTC team, which Google bought in 2017. From the outside, the group is running on all cylinders and is kicking out phones — that team was completely in charge of the well-regarded Pixel 3A and now the Pixel 4.

The ACCC is suing Google over the collection of personal location data – here’s why it matters

  The ACCC is suing Google over the collection of personal location data – here’s why it matters October 30,2019. Majid Rahebi arrives at Sydney's Downing Centre Local Court accused of doing dental work while not registered. (AAP Video/Andrew Leeson)

It’s not clear what will happen to the Fitbit brand. Google attempted to defuse privacy concerns – Fitbit has access not only to customers’ fitness history, but If I recall correctly, Alphabet acquiring FitBit means that Google now controls hardware that 's tied to some people's health insurance coverage?

On Pocketnow Daily, we have some deals for the Google Pixel 3 and 3 XL. Smartphone sales are finally picking up for the first time in two years. We have yet

It’s also worth noting that the deal’s not done yet, and US regulators might well decide that it’s time to stick it to Google. The company will probably argue that the wearables market is still highly competitive: Samsung, Garmin, Xiaomi, and even Huawei all make competing devices, to say nothing of Apple. That’s not an argument that’s likely to convince the new wave of antitrust advocates, but actual regulators tend to be a much easier sell, so it seems like they will revert to their recent norm and let it go through.

Integrating Fitbit is going to be much more complicated than integrating HTC

But if Osterloh can navigate integrating Fitbit into his team as well as the HTC integration has gone (and let Pichai manage whatever comes out of the Department of Justice), we could start seeing the fruits of this acquisition surprisingly soon.

But integrating Fitbit is going to be much more complicated than integrating HTC. Fitbit offers services to customers, and those services will have to be maintained throughout the process. Fitbit also has several overlapping software platforms and a wide array of different products to support. It has a huge user base and new watches it literally just released, which customers will expect to be able to keep using for years to come.

Google buys Fitbit for $2.1B, stepping back into wearables

  Google buys Fitbit for $2.1B, stepping back into wearables Fitbit is being acquired by Google's parent company for about $2.1 billion, a deal that enables the internet company to step back into the hotly contested market for smartwatches and health and fitness trackers. Fitbit is a pioneer in wearable technology, but it's been shredded by that competition. The company's market capitalization soared to just under $10 billion after becoming a public company in 2015. Its value this week is well below $2 billion. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

None of those challenges were in play with HTC. That’s why, to my eye, the Fitbit acquisition looks a lot more like another Google hardware purchase: Nest. Unfortunately, that was another one of those fiasco integrations.

A brief history: Nest came on in 2014 as a division of Google. Integrating two company cultures is always difficult, but executives didn’t make it any easier by buying Dropcam and folding it into Nest right away. Then the next year, Google decided to break itself up into a bunch of little companies under the Alphabet umbrella — but there was and will always be the one big company called Google. Nest bounced around as an Alphabet division for a while, the pressures of which led directly to its CEO Tony Fadell bailing in a high-profile exit in 2016. Then Nest rejoined Google under Osterloh in 2018. Now it is Google’s brand for all its smart home products and finally has gotten back to releasing new devices on a somewhat regular cadence.

Also, somewhere in there Nest released a home security system and forgot to tell everybody it had microphones in it. Oops.

Google needs to do everything it can to support Fitbit users

All of that sounds awful and there are many, many circumstances that applied to Nest that won’t apply to Fitbit. But the core issue for both companies is that they were vertically integrated hardware and software companies before they were bought, and Google will need to figure out how (or even whether) to tease those things apart.

Merging company cultures is one thing. Merging company cultures while simultaneously trying to decide how to split up and merge different technologies into your own systems is another thing entirely. Doing all that while not forgetting to do the right thing by Fitbit customers is going to be a very big challenge.

Why Google's Fitbit deal could break its legacy of hardware failures

  Why Google's Fitbit deal could break its legacy of hardware failures Why Google's Fitbit deal could break its legacy of hardware failuresOn Friday, Google announced it would be acquiring Fitbit for $2.1 billion. It comes as competitor Apple dominates the smartwatch market and Google...well, doesn't.

And all of this is only looking at this acquisition in terms of what it means for Fitbit and Google’s hardware division. There’s also the question of Google Fit, the company’s health software offering. There’s also Wear OS.

Oh, Wear OS. I have spent many months kicking Google’s smartwatch platform when it’s been down — and it has been down a lot. One of the things that initially baffled me about this Fitbit purchase is that I didn’t see how it could help Wear OS with its biggest problem: Google couldn’t replicate the Android model of many manufacturers driving adoption, which then drove processor innovation.

It would be a damn shame if Google’s acquisition led to less smartwatch competition for Android users

The answer is that Google didn’t buy Fitbit to solve that problem. Google is still working to solve it directly — and, at the same time, reassure hardware partners it will still support them even though it’s going to start competing with them directly. In a separate post, Google’s VP of product management for Android, Google Play, and Wear OS, Sameer Samat, wrote this:

We’re looking forward to collaborating with Fitbit to bring the best of our smartwatch platforms and health applications together, and enabling our partners to build the next generation of wearables.

I have no idea what that “collaboration” will look like and I sort of suspect that Google isn’t fully sure either. In fact, I wouldn’t expect to see anything substantial for at least a couple years.

In the meantime, Google needs to close this deal and — more importantly — it needs to go all-out to do everything it can to help and support Fitbit users. People love their Fitbits and the data Fitbit has on them is incredibly intimate. Google whiffed when it communicated changes in the Works with Nest program — it absolutely can’t afford to whiff when it talks to people about their health data.

There’s another version of this story where I would have spent many paragraphs talking about how it’s impossible to make great smartphone accessories when the platform access you really need is so restricted — especially on the iPhone. I would look at Fitbit’s efforts to succeed in the smartwatch space despite those limitations and how they were a continuation of Pebble’s own struggles to do the same thing. I would say it would be a damn shame if Google’s acquisition ultimately led to less smartwatch competition for Android users. I think Google sincerely doesn’t want to do that, but that doesn’t mean it wont happen.

Finally, I am bummed about this acquisition in the same way I was bummed when Amazon bought Eero. With Eero, it was the dawning realization that it is very hard to scale up an independent hardware business without a massive corporation to subsidize your efforts. With Fitbit, it’s that same feeling — but with the added ennui of remembering that inside Fitbit are the remains of another innovative but failed startup: Pebble. Now Pebble is inside Fitbit, which is inside Google hardware, which is inside Google, which is inside Alphabet. It’s a nesting doll of how tech works in 2019.

How to set parental controls on a Samsung Galaxy S10 with Google Family Link, and manage the apps your kids can use .
You can set up parental controls on a Samsung Galaxy S10 with a third-party app from the Google Play Store. There are no parental control features built into a Samsung Galaxy S10 - unlike an iPhone and Apple devices - but it's easy to set these up on any Android phone with the Google Family Link app. The Google Family Link app lets you impose limits on screen time, remotely control the phone, and even check your child's GPS location.To set up Family Link, you need to install the Family Link for children & teens app on your kid's phone and Family Link for parents on your own phone.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!