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Tech & Science The Taurids meteor shower sends fireballs streaking across the sky this week. Here's how to spot them.

18:26  06 november  2019
18:26  06 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

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The Taurids meteor shower streaks across the sky this week , with fireballs that can look Here ' s how to spot them . Business Insider Australia 6/11/2019 Morgan McFall-Johnsen. Look for fireballs in the night sky this week - the Taurids meteor shower is making its biggest appearance of the year.

The Taurid meteor shower , sometimes referred to as the "Halloween fireballs ," is one of the year' s In the case of the Taurids , they are attributed to debris left behind by Encke' s Comet or perhaps by Related: How to See the Best Meteor Showers of 2019. Astrophotographer Jeff Jeff Berkes took this

a view of a sunset: Meteors streak across the sky over a Roman theatre in the ruins of Acinipo, during the Perseid meteor shower near Ronda, southern Spain, in the early morning of August 13, 2015. Meteors streak across the sky over a Roman theatre in the ruins of Acinipo, during the Perseid meteor shower near Ronda, southern Spain, in the early morning of August 13, 2015.
  • The Taurids meteor shower streaks across the sky this week, with fireballs that can look brighter than Venus.
  • The Northern and Southern Taurids coincide to produce five to 10 meteors each hour.
  • This week is the perfect time to view the shooting stars (before the full Beaver Moon outshines them).
  • Steer clear of city lights and look to the Taurus constellation after midnight to get the best views.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Look for fireballs in the night sky this week - the Taurids meteor shower is making its biggest appearance of the year.

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MISSED this week ' s impressive Draconids meteor shower ? There are plenty of opportunities to spy fireballs soaring through the sky . Meteor showers are when fireballs appear to streak across the night sky , like the recent Draconids shower . Taurids (November 10-11) – 10 meteors per hour.

The Taurid meteor shower peaks in November. Use this viewing guide to get ready to watch these big, bright fireballs dash across the night sky . While the Taurid meteor shower doesn't have a lot of shooting stars to offer, the few that will streak across the sky may be bright, spectacular fireballs .

The Taurids aren't the most numerous meteors ⁠(stargazers can expect to see five to 10 each hour), but they offer a reward to patient viewers: Many of these shooting stars explode into brilliant bursts, glowing brighter than Venus.

That's because the meteors barrel into Earth's atmosphere at about 65,000 mph. They can leave behind glowing trails of debris that shine in the sky for up to a second, sometimes appearing orange.

The Taurids come in two different streams, which coincide this week. The Southern Taurids are debris from Comet Encke, a ball of ice, rock, and dust that orbits the sun. The origin of the Northern Taurids is still debated. They could be a stream of dust grains left behind by an asteroid, though some scientists think the Northern Taurids also came from Comet Encke, but were separated from the Southern Taurids by the distant gravitational pull of Jupiter. Still others think the whole field of debris came from the same giant comet, which disintegrated over the last 20,000 to 30,000 years.

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The Draconid meteor shower will be active through October 10, although Tuesday night might afford the best view. The South Taurid meteor shower is expected to peak on the evenings of In this file photo, a meteor streaks across the night sky above some pine trees in the Cleveland National Forest.

The days-long fireball fiesta is expected to peak this evening with an estimated 80 shooting stars per hour Perseid meteor shower as seen from the International Space Station © NASA/Ron Garan It’ s that time of year again, when the spectacular Perseid meteor shower rains fire across the night sky .

Either way, Earth passes through the densest part of this debris field in the last week of October and first week of November, according to the American Meteor Society.

How to watch the Taurids

a man standing in front of a sunset: A stargazer waits for light clouds to clear to watch the Perseid meteor shower to begin near Bobcaygeon, Ontario, August 12, 2015. A stargazer waits for light clouds to clear to watch the Perseid meteor shower to begin near Bobcaygeon, Ontario, August 12, 2015.

This week is a good time to view the Taurids before the full Beaver Moon outshines them on November 11.

To spot the fireballs, find a dark spot with a clear view of the sky, ideally far from city lights. Once the moon sets, a little after midnight, the show begins. Look to the Taurus constellation - that's the area of sky where the shooting stars appear to originate (hence the meteor shower's name).

The Taurids run on a 10-year cycle, and they made a big appearance in 2015. So this year won't be quite that spectacular, but there's still a good chance of fireballs.

After the Taurids, the next meteor shower to look for will be the Leonids, which peak on the night of November 16.

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