Tech & Science : Facebook fought to keep a trove of thousands of explosive internal documents and emails secret. They were just published online in full. - - PressFrom - Australia
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Tech & Science Facebook fought to keep a trove of thousands of explosive internal documents and emails secret. They were just published online in full.

06:10  08 november  2019
06:10  08 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

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Thousands of pages of internal Facebook documents were published on Wednesday, shedding new light on how the company profited from user data An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documents has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on

They were just published online in full . Published : November 6, 2019 Share. An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documents has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the inner workings of the Silicon Valley social-networking giant.

Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in October. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in October.
  • Thousands of pages of internal Facebook documents were published on Wednesday, shedding new light on how the company profited from user data and grappled with rivals.
  • The documents were collected as part of a lawsuit involving Facebook and a developer it took action against, and subsequently leaked.
  • Facebook has fought vigorously against the release of the documents, arguing that they presented an unbalanced picture of the company.
  • Here are the key details you need to know about the unprecedented leak.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documents has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the inner workings of the Silicon Valley social-networking giant.

Hundreds of Facebook employees call on Mark Zuckerberg to change the social network's controversial rules on political ads

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They were just published online in full . An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal The documents were originally compiled as part of a lawsuit that the startup Six4Three brought against Facebook for cutting off its bikini-photo app’s access to the developer platform.

They were just published online in full . Posted on November 7, 2019 by Flee. An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documents has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the inner workings of the Silicon Valley social-networking giant.

On Wednesday, the investigative reporter Duncan Campbell released a vast swathe of internal emails, reports, and other sensitive documents from the early 2010s that detail Facebook's internal approach to privacy and how it worked with app developers and handled their access to user data.

The documents were originally compiled as part of a lawsuit that the startup Six4Three brought against Facebook for cutting off its bikini-photo app's access to the developer platform. The documents were supposed to remain under seal - but they were leaked.

Some of the documents had already been made public before Wednesday. The British Parliament's Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport Committee published hundreds of pages in a report in December; they were seized from Six4Three's founder, Ted Kramer, when he visited the UK.

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Facebook fought to keep a trove of thousands of explosive internal documents and emails secret . An explosive trove of nearly 4,000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documentation has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the inner workings of the Silicon Valley social

They were just published online in full - documents from the early 2010s detail Facebook ’s internal approach to privacy and how it worked with app developers and handled their access to user data.

And in the months before he put the entire trove of documents into the public domain, Campbell shared them with journalists at NBC News and other outlets, who then published several stories about them. (Campbell said that he was sent the documents in February, the same day that the committee published its final report, and that the sender was anonymous.)

Facebook has fought vigorously against the release of the documents, arguing that they do not paint a balanced picture of its activities. In an emailed statement, a company representative told Business Insider: "These old documents have been taken out of context by someone with an agenda against Facebook, and have been distributed publicly with a total disregard for US law."

Business Insider is combing through the documents and will update this story with our findings.

Here are some of the key revelations from the document dump, including from reports published from earlier leaks:

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  Turkey captures sister of slain ISIL leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi Rasmiya Awad was captured alongside her husband and daughter-in-law in a raid on a container near Syria's Azaz."Rasmiya Awad was captured in a raid on a container near Azaz," the official said.

They were just published online in full - documents from the early 2010s detail Facebook ’s internal approach to privacy and how it worked with app Here are some of the key revelations from the document dump, including from reports published from earlier leaks: Facebook wielded its control

Thousands of pages of confidential emails , messages, and documents from inside Facebook were made But internal emails show Facebook employees wanted to restrict competitors' data access, even when This practice was the subject of an NBC News report published in April 2019, and the

  • Facebook executives quietly planned a data-policy "switcharoo." "Facebook began cutting off access to user data for app developers from 2012 to squash potential rivals while presenting the move to the general public as a boon for user privacy," Reuters reported on Wednesday, citing the leaked documents.
  • Facebook considered charging companies to access user data. Documents made public in late 2018 revealed that from 2012 to 2014, Facebook was contemplating forcing companies to pay to access users' data. (It didn't ultimately follow through with the plan.)
  • Facebook leveraged its volumes of user data to benefit its friends while deliberately kneecapping its competitors. NBC reported in April: "In some cases, Facebook would reward favoured companies by giving them access to the data of its users. In other cases, it would deny user-data access to rival companies or apps."
  • Facebook whitelisted certain companies to allow them more extensive access to user data, even after it locked down its developer platform throughout 2014 and 2015.TechCrunch reported in December that it "is not clear that there was any user consent for this, nor how Facebook decided which companies should be whitelisted or not."
  • Facebook planned to spy on the locations of Android users. Citing the documents, Computer Weekly reported in February that "Facebook planned to use its Android app to track the location of its customers and to allow advertisers to send political advertising and invites to dating sites to 'single' people."

The leak includes nearly 4,000 pages of internal Facebook documents, nearly 3,000 pages of other exhibits from the case, and hundreds of pages of other pieces of legal documentation.

Live improvised explosive device found at beach in WA's South West

  Live improvised explosive device found at beach in WA's South West The device was found at the Minninup Beach car park on October 22 by a member of the public, who called police. A forensic investigation of the device found that it could have been detonated, given the right circumstances, but it was unknown how long it had been left at the beach.Police searched the area and a spokesman said it was fortunate no one was injured.“The person who left the device in the car park area appears to have no regard for the safety of others, including children who frequent the beach area with their families,” he said.

An explosive trove of nearly 4000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documents has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the inner workings of the Silicon Valley social-networking giant. The documents were supposed to remain under seal – but they were leaked.

An explosive trove of nearly 4000 pages of confidential internal Facebook documents has been made public, shedding unprecedented light on the On Wednesday, the investigative reporter Duncan Campbell released a vast swathe of internal emails , reports, and other sensitive documents from

This story is developing...

Do you work at Facebook, or a company that interacts with it? Got a tip? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal at +1 (650) 636-6268 using a non-work phone, email at rprice@businessinsider.com, Telegram or WeChat at robaeprice, or Twitter DM at @robaeprice. (PR pitches by email only, please.)

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  • Years of Mark Zuckerberg's old Facebook posts have vanished. The company says it 'mistakenly deleted' them.

NDIS minister has 'no idea' about emails sent to him from private email server .
NDIS Minister Stuart Robert says he has “no idea” whether he received emails from NDIA chair Helen Nugent from her Macquarie Group email account. An investigation was launched by the minister into Ms Nugent’s use of the private email account for NDIS matters and found there had been “no clear breach of privacy". Minister Robert told Sky News an instruction had since been put out to ensure directors do not use private emails. When asked how the process went unchecked for six years, Mr Robert told Sky News, “It was how it was set up back in mid-2013 and it has gone unchecked until I dealt with it”.

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