•   
  •   

Tech & Science ISS astronauts to test remote controlled rovers

05:37  14 november  2019
05:37  14 november  2019 Source:   cnet.com

NASA's sending a rover named VIPER to map the moon's ice deposits

  NASA's sending a rover named VIPER to map the moon's ice deposits NASA's sending a rover named VIPER to map the moon's ice depositsBefore any future missions can set up ice mines, we'll have to know where the stuff is. To that end, NASA is planning to send a prospecting rover to the moon. If all goes well, the golf-cart sized Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover (VIPER) will spend the holiday season of 2022 trundling across the lunar south pole, drilling and sniffing the soil for signs of ice. The map it produces will be essential to both scientists trying to better understand where the moon's water came from, and thirsty future astronauts.

Currently, rovers are controlled by preprogrammed software that responds to commands sent from Earth by scientists, a process that This month's experiment will last two hours, while ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano attempts to control a lunar rover from an orbiting workstation in the ISS with a

on the International Space Station ( ISS ) at the time — remotely operated the K10 planetary rover in an outdoor robotic test area known as the Roverscape. Robots will complement human explorers, allowing astronauts to perform work via remote control from a space station , spacecraft or other

a truck cake sitting on top of a ramp: The Analog-1 Interact rover located near the European Space Research and Technology Centre in the Netherlands is controlled by a surrogate astronaut based at the European Astronaut Center in Germany. The cones mark out a route that the rover has to follow to get to the sample site. European Space Agency© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. The Analog-1 Interact rover located near the European Space Research and Technology Centre in the Netherlands is controlled by a surrogate astronaut based at the European Astronaut Center in Germany. The cones mark out a route that the rover has to follow to get to the sample site. European Space Agency

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station will get their shot this month at remotely piloting a lunar rover on Earth, according to NASA. The test is the final step in an ongoing project to develop future remote rover piloting on both the moon and Mars by astronauts in orbit.

New Research Suggests the Universe May Be a Giant Loop

  New Research Suggests the Universe May Be a Giant Loop New research suggests our universe may actually be a closed loop instead of a never-ending expanse, but the theory has drawn criticism from other cosmologists. A review of data from the European Space Agency’s Planck Experiment revealed significantly more instances of gravitational lensing of the microwave light that makes up cosmic background radiation than expected. This is particularly puzzling, because scientists aren’t currently able to explain how gravity would be able to bend this much microwave light.

UK astronaut Tim Peake has performed a challenging remote control experiment from the International Space Station . He had to command a robot rover on Earth, driving it across a big sandpit in Stevenage, near London, that simulated the surface of Mars. The Briton experienced some

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano will control this rover remotely in November to simulate remote control of future lunar rovers . Test -driving a lunar robot from @ Space _ Station ! In an @esa experiment, @astro_luca and scientists on the ground will work together with new technologies to

Currently, rovers are controlled by preprogrammed software that responds to commands sent from Earth by scientists, a process that involves lengthy delays. Researchers are looking for a better scientific return on rover missions.

"This is a potential scientific scenario during future missions to the Moon and Mars," European Space Agency scientist William Carey, a principal investigator for the experiment, said in a NASA release. "Space is such a harsh place for humans and machines. Future exploration of the solar system may involve sending robotic explorers to test the waters on uncharted planets before sending humans."

This month's experiment will last two hours, while ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano attempts to control a lunar rover from an orbiting workstation in the ISS with a sensory-feedback joystick. Ground communications will assist Parmitano as he navigates the rover over moonlike terrain near the town of Noordwijk in the Netherlands.

NASA said the results will be particularly valuable as the organization looks to explore the moon during its moon-to-Mars Artemis program.

125 Facts That Will Make You Feel Instantly Smarter .
125 Facts That Will Make You Feel Instantly Smarter

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!