Tech & Science : Motorola's iconic Razr flip phone was one of my favourite mobile phones ever— but I wouldn't buy the new one - - PressFrom - Australia
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Tech & Science Motorola's iconic Razr flip phone was one of my favourite mobile phones ever— but I wouldn't buy the new one

16:15  17 november  2019
16:15  17 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

Motorola’s RAZR is back as an all-screen folding smartphone.

  Motorola’s RAZR is back as an all-screen folding smartphone. The iconic flip phone of the 2000s is back as a smartphone with a folding screen.The slim flip phone looked like nothing before it, and the tiny device is still to this day one of the single most popular phones of all time, selling over 130 million units after its introduction in 2004.

Motorola ' s Razr foldable phone is an exciting throwback, but its high price and somewhat lacking specs Motorola ' s iconic Razr flip phone was one of my favorite cellphones ever — but I wouldn ' t buy the FILE PHOTO: A woman looks at her mobile phone next to a 5G sign at the Mobile World

Motorola is describing its new Razr as an “impossible” feat of engineering, with a fold that closes flush against the other side. Samsung’ s Galaxy Fold, by contrast, has a considerable gap between each screen when folded. “With the new Razr we had to rethink how to engineer a phone ,” said Glenn

a hand holding a cellphone
  • Motorola is reviving its popular Razr flip phone from the early 2000s as a new foldable smartphone. Preorders start on December 26 and it will cost $US1,500.
  • Although I loved my original Razr back in 2005, I'm hesitant to buy the new one.
  • While the Razr's vintage-inspired design, compact build, and foldable screen are impressive, the phone seems like it falls short in other areas compared to modern smartphones - particularly when it comes to the camera.
  • That wouldn't matter as much if the Razr wasn't so expensive. But at $US1,500, it's pricier than Apple's iPhone 11 Pro or Samsung'sGalaxy S10.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Motorola is bringing back its iconic Razr flip phone from the early 2000s, a phone that probably invokes just as much nostalgia for millennial-aged smartphone users as their first iPhone or Blackberry handset.

Motorola's new foldable Razr solves a problem with smartphones we didn't know we had

  Motorola's new foldable Razr solves a problem with smartphones we didn't know we had Motorola's new Razr foldable smartphone was announced on Wednesday evening. It's a full-sized smartphone that folds down into something smaller and more compact. It's addressing a problem we don't know we had - that smartphones take up as much space when we're not using them as when we use them. Foldable smartphones that turn into something bigger, like Samsung's Galaxy Fold, are cool, but they're addressing a desire more than solving a problem. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Few phones were as iconic and as ubiquitous as the original Motorola RAZR . Celebs used them constantly, fashion houses cooked up designer mashups, and it wasn' t long before friends, family members and co-workers all started carrying them, too. The RAZR was , in other words, an absolute

Motorola ' s new Razr foldable phone is a revival of the popular flip phone . And based on how the phone looks, it seems like the crease where the screen folds in half won' t be very apparent on the Razr . That may be one area in which the Razr holds an advantage over Samsung's Galaxy Fold, which I

I had a Razr when I was a teenager sometime around the year 2005, and it was the first mobile phone I was ever actually excited to use. Like most people my age at the time, I really just wanted a mobile phone so that I could feel more independent and contact my friends whenever I wanted.

But until the Razr, I didn't really care what type of phone I was using, so long as it could text and make phone calls. The Razr, however, felt like the first phone that was a status symbol. With its angular edges, flat shape, and shiny, sleek keypad, the Razr looked unlike anything else at the time.

The 2019 version, thankfully, maintains this general aesthetic, but with modern functionality. It has an expansive, crisp touchscreen that impressively folds in half, a camera with a high-resolution sensor, and a fingerprint scanner for unlocking the phone, among other familiar features. And compared to other foldable phones that have debuted this year, the Motorola Razr seems well-positioned to succeed.

The Most Important Details From Motorola's Razr Phone Reveal

  The Most Important Details From Motorola's Razr Phone Reveal Last night, Motorola revealed its resurrected Razr phone. The company is clearly banking on nostalgia of the Razr brand combined with the relative neatness of foldable devices, but at its core, the new Razr is still an Android-based smartphone. That means it has to go toe-to-toe with flagship devices from Google, Samsung, and more (including those coming out of Cupertino). If you’re the least bit intrigued by this flip-phone-slash-smartphone, here is quick recap of everything Motorola revealed about the new Razr at last night’s big event. Yes, it’s a sexy phone; yes, it will cost you a lot.

Motorola is it is bringing back its iconic Razr flip phone in 2020, but with a price tag of $ 1 ,500. The Android phone boasts a 16 megapixel camera with "built-in artificial intelligence" and includes a portrait mode feature to help you take better photos. The Razr will only be available on.

Buy a flip phone ." Not all flip phones are relics from another age. The one old flip phone that many are hoping to see a revival of is one of the top selling phones of all time, the Earlier this year, Lenovo CEO Yang Yuanqing hinted that we could see the return of Motorola ' s iconic flip phone .

For starters, it's less expensive than rivals like the Samsung Galaxy Fold. But it also revives a form factor that's proven to have resonated with mobile phone users in the past - the flip phone - rather than asking consumers to get used to something entirely new. And most importantly, since it folds in half, it's more convenient to store in a pocket or purse.

But those benefits alone may not be enough to make the Razr a hit. While its foldable and nostalgic design certainly makes the Razr stand out, it's unclear how well-spent that $US1,500 will feel once the novelty of snapping your phone shut to end a call wears off.

That's because although the Razr is made to look and feel like a 2019-era smartphone, it's lacking in certain areas compared to rival devices from Apple, Samsung, and others.

Here's why I wouldn't buy one.

Its camera falls behind competitors.

a close up of a speaker

The Razr's front-facing camera only has a 5-megapixel sensor, which is a far lower resolution than that of other high-end smartphones like the iPhone 11 Pro or Samsung Galaxy S10. All three of Apple's new iPhones, for example, have a 12-megapixel selfie camera, while all the phones in Samsung's Galaxy S10 family have a 10-megapixel front camera.

So, Is Battery Life Gonna Be A Problem For The Foldable Razr?

  So, Is Battery Life Gonna Be A Problem For The Foldable Razr? Motorola’s new foldable Razr phone is pretty neat. Not only is it a pretty impressive feat of engineering, it packs a nice dose of nostalgia for those of us old enough to remember the days when the original Razr flip phone reigned supreme. There’s just one thing that, at least on paper, raises a red flag. That 2,510 mAh battery. Well, technically it’s two batteries—one in each half—that add up to 2,510 mAh. To put things into perspective, that’s tiny compared to every other smartphone released in 2019. Samsung’s Galaxy S10 has a 3,000 mAh battery, while all the new iPhones top 3,000 mAh, with the 11 Pro Max boasting a 3,969 mAh battery.

Many millennials made their very first mobile phone calls on a Motorola Razr , and the iconic flip phone still gives us all the feels. The new Razr also features Android 9 Pie—the 16th version of the Android mobile operating system—and is packed with 6GB of RAM and 128GB of internal storage.

Motorola ' s Iconic Razr Is Coming Back as a $ 1 ,500 Foldable Smartphone. It's like an early 2000s tech dream come true. Back in 2004, Motorola first released the Razr flip phone , which was seen in basically everyone's hand and was the ultimate pre-iPhone "it" phone .

But more importantly, the primary camera on the back of the Razr, the one you'll probably use to take the majority of your photos, only has one 16-megapixel lens. That may not sound like a shortcoming, but Motorola is putting a single lens camera on an expensive smartphone at a time when triple-lens cameras are quickly becoming the norm.

Both the iPhone 11 Pro and Samsung Galaxy S10, for instance, have wide-angle, telephoto, and ultra-wide-angle cameras that allow for more flexibility when shooting with your smartphone. I've found the ultra-wide-angle lens on the iPhone 11 Pro and Galaxy S10 to be especially useful, considering it makes it possible to squeeze much more of the scene into a frame than smartphones of years past. It's a useful feature I'd sorely miss if I ever try switching to the Razr.

It doesn't support 5G connectivity.

FILE PHOTO: A woman looks at her mobile phone next to a 5G sign at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona FILE PHOTO: A woman looks at her mobile phone next to a 5G sign at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona

That might not be very important right now, considering 5G networks are far from being available on a widespread basis. But if you're investing $US1,500 in a new phone, you'll probably want to hold onto it for at least three years. By not supporting 5G, the Razr could quickly feel out of date.

The new Motorola Razr is the most desirable smartphone in years, but there are 4 key reasons why you shouldn't buy it

  The new Motorola Razr is the most desirable smartphone in years, but there are 4 key reasons why you shouldn't buy it The new MotorolaRazr is the most desirable smartphoneI've seen in years, and yet it's not a phone that people who care about functionality and value should buy. It has a high price tag, less-powerful specs, fewer features, and foldable-smartphone technology still has a long way to go before it's as reliable as regular smartphones. Instead, the new Razr will appeal to those who value fashion and design. After all, it looks like the iconic Razr from the mid 2000s that's been modernised into an ultra-sleek smartphone with a long, foldable screen. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Motorola ’ s RAZR phone was a noughties fashion icon – and the king of flip phones , with eventual worldwide sales of 130 million units. It’s one of several folding smartphone devices slated for release this year, with Samsung also promising a Galaxy phone with a folding screen.

Few phones can claim to be iconic . The Motorola Razr , however, is one such phone . It was the device to establish the flip phone as a truly memorable As it uses a POLED display (that' s plastic OLED) there' s no need for two screens: this is one panel, which is flexible and folds down the centre

Despite these shortcomings, it's still more expensive than today's high-end smartphones.

a close up of a computer: Motorola's revisited Razr phone. Motorola's revisited Razr phone.

The iPhone 11 Pro and Samsung Galaxy S10 both look like a bargain compared to the $US1,500 Razr: the iPhone 11 Pro starts at $US1,000, while the larger Pro Max starts at $US1,100, and the Galaxy S10 starts at $US900. The highest configuration of the iPhone 11 Pro Max, which offers a 6.5-inch display and 512 GB of storage, is still $US50 cheaper than the Razr at $US1,450. It has four times the amount of storage space compared to the Razr and a larger screen, in addition to a triple-lens camera and higher-resolution selfie camera.

For the price, it doesn't look like it will add much that's new to the smartphone experience.

a hand holding a cellphone

The Razr's main selling point is that it can fold in half, making it much easier to stow away in a pocket or purse. That level of convenience is important considering today's smartphones are larger than ever.

But beyond making your smartphone more portable - and bringing back the ability to snap your phone shut to hang up on someone - it doesn't look like there will be much that makes using the Razr different than any other smartphone.

The Galaxy Fold, despite the durability issues it faced earlier this year, at least made it possible to do more with your phone. I loved using the Fold to expand the size of my phone's screen, making everyday tasks like playing a game, watching Netflix, or even just reading email feel more enjoyable. It made me hopeful for a future in which buying one device that serves as both a phone and a tablet felt like a viable option for most people

Motorola took its time creating a foldable phone that wouldn't break like the early Samsung Galaxy Fold

  Motorola took its time creating a foldable phone that wouldn't break like the early Samsung Galaxy Fold Motorola has announced a foldable, smartphone version of its iconic Razr flip phone, which will be available to preorder on December 26 and is scheduled for release in the US in January. With its sleek-yet-jagged aesthetic and metallic keyboard, the Razr was all the rage in the early-to-mid 2000s, before Apple's iPhone came onto the scene. In-depth report from CNET, multiple executives and engineers at Motorola and its parent company Lenovo explained the new Razr's development process - especially the design of its all-important folding hinge.

phones are truly the future, but Motorola ’ s revamped Razr has certainly thrown more fuel on the fire. Motorola has done a good job of resurrecting that iconic design and putting a modern twist on it. The new Motorola Razr is unmistakably part of the same family, but it manages to look modern.

The new Motorola Razr is the most desirable smartphone I 've seen in years, and yet it' s not a phone that people who care about functionality and value should buy . After all, it looks like the iconic Razr from the mid 2000 s that' s been modernized into an ultra-sleek smartphone with a long, foldable screen.

Buying a first-generation product can be risky.

a close up of a hand holding a cell phone

It's exciting to see smartphones that experiment with new designs and form factors, and doing so is necessary to keep pushing the industry forward. But it's also worth considering that purchasing a first-generation product is always a risky move. Since it's Motorola's first foldable phone, and one of the first foldable phones period, there's no telling how well it's going to hold up over time.

No one would have guessed that the screen on Samsung's Galaxy Fold was prone to issues, but then several reviewers reported that the display malfunctioned after only a couple of days of use. The Razr's screen has a protective scratch-resistant coating, and the device has a zero-gap hinge that should protect the display from debris. These measures will hopefully ensure that the Razr isn't prone to damage as the first version of the Fold was, but it's impossible to know for sure without using it.

But of course, none of this has anything to do with what really makes the Razr appealing in the first place.

a hand holding a cellphone

You could argue that I'm missing the point by picking apart the Razr's technical specifications and zeroing in on the features it doesn't have. The Razr isn't meant to be like the iPhone 11 Pro or Samsung Galaxy S10.

You're paying a premium to get a one-of-a-kind phone with a foldable screen that has the look and feel of the mobile phone you probably had back in 2005. Even if you didn't have the Razr, you probably had a flip phone of some kind, and the new Razr is designed to emulate that experience with a modern twist.

But it comes at a high price, just like the original. And in an era in which we rely on our phones for a lot more than we did back in the early 2000s, you'll have to decide whether it's worth the trade-offs.

Half of all Australian kids have hands on mobile phones, according to Communication and Media Authority survey .
Phones are more technologically advanced then ever before and so it seems are Australian kids, with half of all children aged between 6 and 13 having access to a device.A survey by the Australian Communication and Media Authority finds 48 per cent of children aged 6-13 either own or have access to a mobile phone.

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