Tech & Science : Google's parent company Alphabet is getting back into robots, but this time it's using AI to create robots that can learn on their own - - PressFrom - Australia
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Tech & Science Google's parent company Alphabet is getting back into robots, but this time it's using AI to create robots that can learn on their own

00:00  22 november  2019
00:00  22 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

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Alphabet , the parent company of Google , is getting back into robotics after a first attempt several years ago fizzled. But this time the company wants to create robots with minds of their own . The company ' s R&D lab, known as X, announced the Everyday Robot Project on Thursday, describing its

The robots had been instructed to work out how to negotiate between themselves, and improve their bartering as they went along. But they were not told to use comprehensible English, allowing them to create their own "shorthand", according to researchers. The actual negotiations appear very odd

a close up of a cluttered table
  • Alphabet's X group, the R&D lab formerly known as Google X, introduced the Everyday Robot Project on Thursday.
  • The project is Alphabet's second attempt to get into the robotics business, following a failed string of acquisitions several years ago.
  • The new project is focused on building robots capable of useful, everyday tasks, like sorting recycling.
  • Alphabet's X group said it will focus on AI-enabled robots that can be learn tasks on their own, rather than being programmed to do specific things.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Alphabet, the parent company of Google, is getting back into robotics after a first attempt several years ago fizzled. But this time the company wants to create robots with minds of their own.

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Google ' s parent is infusing robots with artificial intelligence so they can help with tasks like lending a supporting arm to the elderly, or sorting trash. Sorting trash was chosen as a convenient challenge to test the project’s approach to creating more capable robots . It ’ s using artificial intelligence software

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The company's R&D lab, known as X, announced the Everyday Robot Project on Thursday, describing its efforts to build a new breed of robots infused with artificial intelligence. The goal is a robot that can be "taught" how do to something, rather than needing to be programmed by humans ahead of time to perform a chore.

"It's possible for robots to learn how to perform new tasks in the real world just through practice, rather than having engineers 'hand code' every new task, exception, or improvement," Hans Peter Brondmo, Alphabet X's "Chief Robot Whisperer", wrote in a blog post announcing the news Thursday.

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Every week it seems like Google or Facebook are releasing a new kind of AI to make things faster or improve Some argue deep learning can be considered AI , others will say it ’ s not AI unless it passes the Turing Test. Computers are smart but they still can’t learn on their own . They need your help.

Learn about robots and artificial intelligence and AI research. Artificial intelligence ( AI ) is arguably the most exciting field in robotics. It ' s certainly the most controversial: Everybody agrees that a robot can work in an assembly line, but there' s no consensus on whether a robot can ever be intelligent.

The robots can learn by observing human demonstrations and by "shared experiences," the company said.

The X group said the robots were still years away from being commercially available. But it described a vision of consumer robots capable of operating autonomously in homes and offices.

"This team's moonshot is to see if it's possible to make robots as helpful to people in the physical world as computers are now in the virtual world," the company said.

Alphabet has been testing the robots with simple tasks, like sorting garbage into landfill, compost, and recycling piles. Robots learned how to perform these tasks with a combination of simulation, reinforcement, and collaborative learning, according to Google. The company says that its success at this task proves that robots can learn new tasks in the real world through practice.

a group of people standing in front of a building

"Our next challenge is to see if we can take what the robot learned in this task and apply that learning to another task without rebuilding the robot or writing a ton of code from scratch. This could prove to be impossible, but we'll give it a shot," Brondmo wrote.

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A robot is a machine—especially one programmable by a computer— capable of carrying out a complex series of actions automatically.

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google ' s parent company Alphabet , also believes data skills will be in-demand moving forward. And the overwhelming majority of those who participated in the survey, about 75 percent, believe it ' s their own responsibility to update their skills, rather than rely

This isn't the first time Google has bet on robotics as the future of tech. In 2013, Google bought several top robotics companies, including Boston Dynamics, but the project was scrapped after two years and many of the acquired companies have been spun off. Now, Google seems to be picking up where it left off in a quest to build household robots.

This project could eventually be in direct competition with Amazon's consumer robot. The company is reportedly working on a robot codenamed "Vesta" that would act as a mobile version of the Alexa voice assistant.

Humans react poorly to trash talk, even if it's coming from a cute robot that's been programmed to insult them, researchers found .
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