Tech & Science : Boeing's 737 Max shouldn't be allowed to fly with a controversial flight-control system, an aviation regulator reportedly said in leaked emails - - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

Tech & Science Boeing's 737 Max shouldn't be allowed to fly with a controversial flight-control system, an aviation regulator reportedly said in leaked emails

00:05  23 november  2019
00:05  23 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

Sudden death of toddler on flight prompts emergency landing at St. John's airport

  Sudden death of toddler on flight prompts emergency landing at St. John's airport The Royal Newfoundland Constabulary is investigating but say the death of a two-year-old aboard a Saudi Arabian Airlines flight that was diverted to St. John's doesn't appear to be suspicious.Police and paramedics were dispatched to the airport where Saudi Arabian Airlines Flight 35 had landed, shortly before noon.

Boeing ' s 737 Max shouldn ' t be allowed to fly with a controversial flight - control system , an aviation regulator reportedly said in leaked emails . In the email , Marko reportedly expressed concerns that regulators would feel pressured into accepting the updated software and certifying the

US regulators have uncovered a possible new flaw in Boeing ' s troubled 737 Max aircraft that is likely to push back test flights. The company is upgrading the aircraft's flight control system , which is the focus of crash "We trust the Federal Aviation Administration, in its role as the certifying regulator

FILE PHOTO: The angle of attack sensor, at bottom centre, is seen on a 737 Max aircraft at the Boeing factory in Renton, Washington, U.S., March 27, 2019. FILE PHOTO: The angle of attack sensor, at bottom centre, is seen on a 737 Max aircraft at the Boeing factory in Renton, Washington, U.S., March 27, 2019.
  • A manager at Canada's aviation regulator wrote in an email that Boeing's 737 Max should not be allowed to fly again with the controversial MCAS automated flight-control system, according to a New York Times report.
  • In the leaked email, which was originally sent to officials at the FAA, as well as the European and Brazilian aviation regulators, the Canadian official said that he was worried that regulators might end up approving Boeing's fix to the system, even if issues continued to emerge.
  • At least one manager at the FAA agreed, according to the Times.
  • Sign up for Business Insider's transportation newsletter, Shifting Gears, to get more stories like this in your inbox.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A manager at Canada's air safety regulator said that Boeing should remove an automated system, MCAS, from the 737 Max before the plane is allowed to fly again, according to a New York Times report.

SpaceX test fires crew capsule's abort engines

  SpaceX test fires crew capsule's abort engines The test will help clear the way for an in-flight abort test as early as next monthThis time around, the capsule's eight Super Draco engines ignited and fired as planned, generating a combined 120,000 pounds of thrust just as they would during flight if sensors detected an impending booster malfunction. The engines shut down as planned about 5 seconds after ignition.

Many airlines have decided not to fly the Boeing 737 Max 8 after that model crashed in Ethiopia on I want great flying professionals that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a plane!” Boeing plans changes to plane’ s control systems . Boeing is negotiating with the Federal Aviation

In a statement, Boeing said , “The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has The way to counter that is to point the nose of the plane slightly downward, which safety systems will Any issue with the 737 MAX is concerning because it’ s proving to be a popular model around the world for

The statement was reportedly made in emails to counterparts at the US Federal Aviation Administration, The European Union Aviation Safety Agency and Brazil's National Civil Aviation Agency, which were reviewed by the Times.

The 737 Max, the latest version of Boeing's best-selling plane, has been grounded since March after crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people.

Passenger jet bursts into flames after landing in Egypt

  Passenger jet bursts into flames after landing in Egypt A passenger jet carrying 196 people burst into flames just after landing at an airport in Egypt. The Boeing 737-800 had just landed at Sharm el Sheikh Airport when hydraulic fluid leaked onto the hot brakes of the aircraft.Flight PQ7153 was taxiing on the runway when the left landing gear burst into flames.Airport CCTV footage captures the moment the plane comes to a stop and the wheels on the left side of the aircraft turn into a fireball.Emergency crews were deployed and put out the fire within a few minutes.There were no injuries to the 189 passengers and seven crew members who were safely evacuated.

The Boeing 737 MAX is a narrow-body aircraft series manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes as the fourth generation of the Boeing 737 , succeeding the Boeing 737 Next Generation (NG).

Europe’ s aviation regulator has outlined five major requirements it wants Boeing Co. to address Boeing Reprograms 737 System Linked to Crashes. A software update will prevent a single sensor EASA director Patrick Ky said in an interview last month that retrofitting additional hardware was not

Investigations into the two crashes suggest that MCAS, or the Manoeuvring Characteristics Augmentation System, erroneously engaged, forcing the planes' noses to point down, and that pilots were unable to regain control of the aircraft.

MCAS was designed to compensate for the 737 Max having larger engines than previous 737 generations. The larger engines could cause the plane's nose to tip upward, leading to a stall - in that situation, the system could automatically point the nose down to negate the effect of the engine size.

Boeing has been working at a furious pace to fix the MCAS software to prevent future accidental activations, and redesigning the plane's flight computer system, but there is still no clear indication of when the plane will return to service.

In the emails, Jim Marko, the manager in aircraft integration and safety assessment at Transport Canada Civil Aviation, wrote that the "only way I see moving forward at this point, is that MCAS has to go," the Times reported.

The new seal for the Navy's next aircraft carrier contains a hint about big changes coming to naval aviation

  The new seal for the Navy's next aircraft carrier contains a hint about big changes coming to naval aviation The US Navy's latest aircraft carrier, the John F. Kennedy, will be christened in December and should be commissioned next year. The service recently published the carrier's official seal that commemorates its namesake and hints at what the future of naval aviation will look like. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. This month, the US Navy unveiled the official seal for the future aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy, which was officially launched on October 29 - three months ahead of schedule.

The 200-seat Boeing 737 Max 8 has been a popular plane since it came on the market in 2017, with more than 4,000 planes ordered within the first A spokesman for Southwest said that the airline had canceled 5 Max flights out of 4,100 flights today as most passengers were moved to other aircraft.

Boeing didn' t tell airline pilots about features of a new flight - control system in its 737 Max that reportedly is a focus of the investigation into last month' s deadly crash in Indonesia, according to pilots who fly the jet in the U. S . Pilots say they were not trained in new features of an anti-stall system in

According to a different email reviewed by The Times, at least one FAA manager, Linh Le, shares his view.

Le, a system safety manager, reportedly forwarded Marko's email to colleagues, and writing that Marko was concerned that "MCAS introduces catastrophic hazards that weren't there before," and that "it and the fix add too much complexity." Le reportedly also said that he had similar concerns.

In the email, Marko reportedly expressed concerns that regulators would feel pressured into accepting the updated software and certifying the Max to fly, even if issues with the fix continued to arise.

The email reportedly included a presentation into how Boeing could remove MCAS from the jet.

In a statement provided to Business Insider, Boeing said, "We continue to work with the F.A.A. and global regulators to provide them the information they are requesting to certify the Max for safe return to service."

The FAA, and Canadian, European, and Brazilian regulators did not immediately return Business Insider's requests for comment.

Are you an employee at Boeing, an aviation regulator, or an airline affected by the Boeing 737 Max grounding? Contact this reporter at dslotnick@businessinsider.com.

Canadian official's critique of 737 MAX software reflects 'working-level' view - regulator .
UK-BOEING-737MAX-CANADA:Canadian official's critique of 737 MAX software reflects 'working-level' view - regulatorThe New York Times reported that an engineering manager in aircraft integration and safety assessment at Transport Canada emailed international regulators on Tuesday saying: "The only way I see moving forward at this point" is that Boeing's MCAS system "has to go.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!