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Tech & Science OnePlus discloses data breach, less than two years after the last one

12:20  23 november  2019
12:20  23 november  2019 Source:   theverge.com

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OnePlus has suffered a data breach : the company says an “unauthorized party” accessed some customers’ order information. That suggests the breach happened through the OnePlus website, perhaps the online store, rather than its phones.

Early in 2018, popular cellphone maker OnePlus revealed it had coughed up credit card information on over 40,000 users in a data breach , and now it's This time, while the website is the source of the breach , the company believes payment info is unaffected, however information exposed may include

a hand holding a video game© Photo by Jon Porter / The Verge

OnePlus has suffered a data breach: the company says an “unauthorized party” accessed some customers’ order information. In a statement, OnePlus says some customer names, contact numbers, emails, and shipping addresses “may have been exposed,” but also that “all payment information, passwords and accounts are safe.” The company began notifying affected customers today.

In an FAQ, the company says the breach was discovered last week, and that it has “inspected our website thoroughly to ensure that there are no similar security flaws.” That suggests the breach happened through the OnePlus website, perhaps the online store, rather than its phones.

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The Facebook breach makes it clear: data must be regulated. In California, where Google is headquartered, companies are only required to disclose a data leak if it includes both David Carroll is a US professor who sued Cambridge Analytica earlier this year to find out what data the company

Before disclosing the data breach , OnePlus says that it informed the authorities and all impacted customers by email. At the moment, the company is OnePlus customers who haven't yet received an email notifying them of the data breach were told by the Chinese phone maker in a security incident

The company said that it took “immediate steps to stop the intruder and reinforce security” and to make sure there weren’t similar vulnerabilities, but it hasn’t explained why it took more than a week to disclose the incident (or why it waited to do so until the Friday before a major US holiday). The company also apparently isn’t answering questions: when we asked how many customers may have been affected, OnePlus simply shared a similar statement to the one it posted online without any additional information.

Despite the idea that your name, phone number, and personal address may have all been exposed, OnePlus’s FAQ pretends that the worst that might happen is this:

What are the consequences?

Impacted users may receive spam and phishing emails as a result of this incident.

This isn’t OnePlus’ first security incident — in January 2018, the company said that up to 40,000 customers had been affected by a security breach that caused customers’ credit card information to be stolen.

OnePlus did say in its FAQ that, as part of its efforts to upgrade its security program, it will be partnering with a “world-renowned security platform next month” and will launch a bug bounty program by the end of December. Maybe it should have done that after the first breach.

OnePlus suffers second major data breach in two years .
Late on Friday, OnePlus revealed that its systems were breached by an unauthorized third party individual or individuals and that a whole bunch of user information was exposed. Back in early 2018, OnePlus revealed that a data breach exposed the credit card details of some 40,000 of its customers. That breach happened in November of the previous year and included credit card numbers, security codes, and expiration dates. This latest breach appears to be somewhat less serious, but it’s nonetheless annoying for OnePlus users.

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