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Tech & Science Wow, Facebook Really Made A Facial Recognition App For Its Employees

05:25  25 november  2019
05:25  25 november  2019 Source:   gizmodo.com.au

Facial recognition protesters put smartphones on their heads to scan the faces of 13,000 Washington DC inhabitants

  Facial recognition protesters put smartphones on their heads to scan the faces of 13,000 Washington DC inhabitants Three activists wandered around busy spots in Washington DC on Thursday using cameraphones to run people's faces through facial recognition software in protest against growing use of the technology. The software they used was Rekognition, Amazon's commercially available and sometimes controversial facial recognition tool.The protesters collected 13,740 face scans, including one congressman.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Protesters against facial recognition donned white hazmat suits and cameras to collect face scans of more than 13,000 people.

In its latest privacy faux pas to come to light, Facebook confirmed it built a now-defunct app for its employees that used facial recognition While it may seem like much ado about a defunct company app , this news gives us a better idea on the extent to which Facebook experimented and fine-tuned

A Facebook spokesperson says that the facial recognition app could only identify the faces of people working at Facebook and the Facebook friends of the employees if they have turned on the facial recognition feature in their accounts. As per Business Insider’s sources, the app had a very primitive

a close up of a logo: Photo: Denis Charlet, Getty Images© Photo: Denis Charlet, Getty Images Photo: Denis Charlet, Getty Images

In its latest privacy faux pas to come to light, Facebook confirmed it built a now-defunct app for its employees that used facial recognition technology to identify coworkers and their friends, CNET reported this week.

Business Insider first broke the story Friday, citing multiple anonymous sources who claimed employees could simply point their phone at someone for the app to recognise that person’s name and profile picture, and that one version—provided you fed it enough data—could track down anyone on the platform. It was purportedly developed between 2015 and 2016, a.k.a. pre-Cambridge Analytica scandal and subsequent heightened federal scrutiny, and has since been discontinued.

Microsoft hired former Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate an Israeli facial recognition company that it invested in

  Microsoft hired former Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate an Israeli facial recognition company that it invested in Microsoft hired US Attorney General Eric Holder to audit an Israeli facial recognition company called AnyVision. Microsoft invested in AnyVision this summer via M12, its venture capital arm. Microsoft's investment was met with backlash by the ACLU. News reports suggest AnyVision's technology is secretly used to monitor Palestinian residents in the West Bank. AnyVision has denied that it uses facial recognition for surveillance in the West Bank. Microsoft has worked to establish itself as a leader in tech industry ethics, including by publishing in December six principles to guide its facial recognition work.

Facebook 's stance on facial recognition has changed as of late, but its past enthusiasm for the technology may The Morning After: Tesla really made a low polygon count pickup truck. The app has since been discontinued, and there's a distinct chance you won't hear of something like it again.

Facebook employees once had access to a very creepy-sounding facial - recognition app . Which is why Facebook 's use of facial - recognition technology has been widely criticized by officials Earlier this year, the company finally changed its facial recognition settings to make it easier for users to

In a statement to CNET, a Facebook spokesperson denied that it was capable of identifying any Facebook user, as it was “only available to Facebook employees, and could only recognise employees and their friends who had face recognition enabled.” According to the spokesperson, Facebook’s teams routinely build internal software like this “as a way to learn about new technologies.” The company did not immediately respond to Gizmodo’s request for comment.

Facial recognition makes subtle advance in Britain

  Facial recognition makes subtle advance in Britain The experiment was conducted discreetly. Between 2016 and 2018, two surveillance cameras were installed in the Kings Cross area of London to analyse and track passers-by using facial recognition technology. The deployment of the cutting-edge technology at one of the British capital's busiest transport hubs, which was first revealed in the Financial Times, has fuelled controversy in Britain where its use does not yet have a legal framework.The company in charge of the project argued it has acted "only to help the police... prevent and detect crimes in the area", and that it had no commercial use.

Facebook acknowledged it had developed a facial recognition app , but Business Insider reported that the app was in its early stages. Employees would point their phone camera at The feature used to be turned on by default unless you chose to opt out of it, but Facebook this year made it opt-in.

Facebook reportedly tested an app for employees , allowing them to identify people by simply pointing their camera on them as per a new report In recent times, Facebook has made moves to curtail its built-in facial recognition . Though one particular statement now stands out in light of this recent news.

While it may seem like much ado about a defunct company app, this news gives us a better idea on the extent to which Facebook experimented and fine-tuned the kind of facial recognition technology it later incorporated into its platforms in 2017, which then became the subject of fiery consumer pushback and a federal investigation. All so that users wouldn’t have to deal with the hassle of tagging their friends in photos.

While I’m certainly side-eyeing the supposed capabilities of this company app and what that means for any future software Facebook develops, from the amount of public and federal heat the company’s currently under regarding its face tech, it wouldn’t make much marketing sense for ol’ Zuck to power forward on that front just yet.

In response to these criticisms—or, more likely, the FTC mandates the company incurred along with a $US5 ($7) billion fine—Facebook’s adopted new regulations to increase transparency on its platforms when it comes to using its facial recognition software, such as no longer turning it on by default because that’s incredibly creepy. And yet, as we now know based on reports about this internal app, things could have been far, far creepier.

DHS may require US citizens be photographed at airports .
DALLAS (AP) — Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers — including American citizens — be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology. The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Officials did not respond to requests for more details. Critics are already raising objections. Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass.,The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Officials did not respond to requests for more details.

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