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Tech & Science First Measurements Of A Blue Whale's Heart Rate Is A Glimpse Into The Biology Of Extremes

23:26  25 november  2019
23:26  25 november  2019 Source:   gizmodo.com.au

Facebook gets into the meme-making biz with experimental Whale app

  Facebook gets into the meme-making biz with experimental Whale app The app was quietly released in Canada last weekThe app’s listing confirms that it’s been developed by Facebook’s New Product Experimentation (NPE) team, which was set up earlier this year to develop new experimental apps for the social media giant. At the time, Facebook said it was using the separate brand name to set the expectation that its apps could change rapidly, or even shut down if the company finds that they’re not useful for people. NPE is also credited with releasing two other apps called Bump and Aux. A Facebook spokesperson told The Information that the apps are intended to help the company discover new features and services that people like.

For the first time ever, marine biologists have recorded the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild—the results of which even surprised the scientists. At the same time, the new study, co-authored by marine biologist Jeremy Goldbogen from the School of Humanities Sciences at Stanford University

Researchers report first recording of a blue whale ' s heart rate .

a person riding a wave on a surfboard in the water: Researchers from the Goldbogen Lab place a suction-cup tag on a blue whale in Monterey Bay. (Image: Goldbogen Lab/Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab; NMFS Permit 16111) © Image: Goldbogen Lab/Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab; NMFS Permit 16111 Researchers from the Goldbogen Lab place a suction-cup tag on a blue whale in Monterey Bay. (Image: Goldbogen Lab/Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab; NMFS Permit 16111)

For the first time ever, marine biologists have recorded the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild—the results of which even surprised the scientists.

New research published Monday in Proceedings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences is the first to provide a heart rate profile for free-ranging blue whales. The resulting data shows how the hearts of these enormous cetaceans help them hold their breath for prolonged periods of time as well as how they’re suddenly able to exert the energy needed for lunge feeding and then replenish their blood oxygen levels when back at the surface.

Facebook launched an experimental meme app called Whale – here's how it works

  Facebook launched an experimental meme app called Whale – here's how it works Facebook quietly launched a meme creation app called Whale, which lets people layer doodles, emojis, and other visual effects over their own photos or stock images. It's essentially a simple image-editing tool, designed to create shareable visuals for social.Whale is only available in Canada's App Store for now and was created by Facebook's experimental apps team.We tried Whale to find out how it works.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Facebook has quietly launched an image-editing app called Whale, intended to generate memes that can be easily edited and shared across different social and messaging apps.

SCIENCE You’ve probably heard claims that a blue whale ’ s heart is the size of a car, and that people could swim through their aortas. The blue whale is the largest animal ever to have lived. One urban legend says that its heart is as big as a Volkswagen Beetle! For the first time, scientists have tested

The blue whale is a massive creature and is the largest living animal in the world; even larger than most dinosaurs. The largest of the blue whales can measure in at over 100 In terms of size the blue whales heart is about the size of a small car. At a rate of 8 – 10 beats per minute the blue whale ’ s

At the same time, the new study, co-authored by marine biologist Jeremy Goldbogen from the School of Humanities Sciences at Stanford University, suggests the blue whale has reached the largest size possible for an aquatic organism on Earth. The cardiovascular system of the blue whale, while impressive, is probably the limit of what is biologically possible, according to the new research.

a shark in the water: A tagged blue whale off the coast of California in Monterey Bay.  (Image: Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab) © Image: Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab A tagged blue whale off the coast of California in Monterey Bay.

(Image: Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab)

Blue whales are the largest creatures to have ever lived on the planet. These aquatic mammals can reach upwards of 30 metres in length and weigh an astonishing 173 metric tons (172,365 kilograms). To put this into perspective, that’s equal to about 292 very heavy African elephants—currently the largest terrestrial animal on Earth.

Facebook launched an experimental meme app called Whale – here's how it works

  Facebook launched an experimental meme app called Whale – here's how it works Facebook quietly launched a meme creation app called Whale, which lets people layer doodles, emojis, and other visual effects over their own photos or stock images. It's essentially a simple image-editing tool, designed to create shareable visuals for social.Whale is only available in Canada's App Store for now and was created by Facebook's experimental apps team.We tried Whale to find out how it works.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Facebook has quietly launched an image-editing app called Whale, intended to generate memes that can be easily edited and shared across different social and messaging apps.

When a blue whale washed up in Newfoundland in 2014, Jacqueline Miller launched into action. German anatomists soak the heart in acetone, constantly changing out the fluid. Over six months, the acetone replaces all the water molecules in the tissue.

The blue whale represents the extreme upper limit of size and physiology. The aorta was also discovered to be slightly smaller than it is reputed to "To our knowledge this is the first blue whale heart to be anatomically preserved for exhibit and study. People are always curious how big it is, and

Living in the ocean is what allow blue whales to grow to such an enormous size possible, as no creature of that immensity could possibly support itself on land. The largest land animals to have ever lived were the titanosaurs, a group of four-legged, long-necked dinosaurs that included Argentinosaurus, Brontosaurus, and Rapetosaurus. These herbivores got as long as 15 metres and weighed nearly 82 metric tons (82,000 kilograms). They were big, no doubt about it, but not nearly as big as the blue whale.

The new research notes that another important factor allowing blue whales to grow so large is their highly specialised cardiovascular system. For marine biologists, however, understanding exactly what makes the blue whale’s heart tick has proven difficult given they’re almost too big to measure. To overcome this hurdle, Goldbogen and his colleagues developed an electrocardiogram (ECG) tag that they attached to a blue whale with suction cups.

With suction cups and lots of luck, scientists measure blue whale's heart rate

  With suction cups and lots of luck, scientists measure blue whale's heart rate With suction cups and lots of luck, scientists measure blue whale's heart rateWASHINGTON (Reuters) - Using a bright orange electrocardiogram machine attached with suction cups to the body of a blue whale, scientists for the first time have measured the heart rate of the world's largest creature and came away with insight about the renowned behemoth's physiology.

The Blue Whale ’ s Heart Beats at Extremes . For the first time, scientists recorded a cardiogram “You have long days at sea and in front of a computer, but those are the moments you get into this During dives, the whale ’ s heart rate plummeted to four to eight beats a minute, and sometimes as

Contrary to legend, the aorta of a blue whale may not actually be big enough to fit a human inside. Experts at the Royal Ontario Museum have dissected a blue whale and preserved its heart for the first time, finally giving us an intact specimen to measure the myths of the whale ’ s immensity against.

That’s right—suction cups.

“I honestly thought it was a long shot because we had to get so many things right: finding a blue whale, getting the tag in just the right location on the whale, good contact with the whale’s skin and, of course, making sure the tag is working and recording data,” said Goldbogen in a press release.

a man riding on the back of a boat in a body of water: Researchers deploying a digital heart rate recording tag as a blue whale surfaces to breathe.   (Image: M.S. Savoca) © Image: M.S. Savoca Researchers deploying a digital heart rate recording tag as a blue whale surfaces to breathe.

(Image: M.S. Savoca)

The researchers managed to attach their device next to the flipper of a 15-year-old male blue whale in Monterey Bay, California. The device tracked the rhythms of the whale’s heart as it dove to depths of 184 meters (604 feet), and as it stayed underwater for nearly 17 minutes at a time.

Looking at the results, the researchers were able to chronicle the blue whale’s heart rate as it went about its daily routine. When the whale made a deep dive, its heart rate slowed to a crawl, beating around 4 to 8 beats per minute (bpm) on average, and sometimes as slow as two beats per minute (the normal resting heart rates for humans is between 60 to 100 bpm). With this radically diminished heart rate, the whale was able to conserve its blood oxygen supply, allowing it to stay underwater for prolonged periods of time and maximise foraging time.

Blue Whale Heart Rate Can Drop to Just Two Beats Per Minute While Diving

  Blue Whale Heart Rate Can Drop to Just Two Beats Per Minute While Diving For the first time, scientists have recorded the heat rate of the biggest species of animal on Earth.Blue whales are the biggest animals on Earth, reaching between 80 and 100 feet in length. They are believed to have appeared about 1.5 million years ago. Earlier this year, researchers found evidence to suggest that baleen whales—which blue whales are a type of—evolved huge body sizes far earlier than once thought, raising questions about their role they have played in the development of ocean ecosystems.

I wonder if that would also be the case in the blue whale . Stimulation of trigeminal afferents (in Since they are extreme divers (compared to terrestrial mammals), there was a strong selection for this Since the blue whale is always in water heart rate is closely linked with respiration slowing after

Number of blue whales decreased drastically in the first half of the 20th century when whalers hunted them Heart of the blue whale is the same size as the Mini Cooper. It beats 5 to 6 times in a minute while on Blue whale ' s major arteries and veins are so large that small child can pass through them.

a group of people on a beach: Diagram showing the blue whale’s heart rate as it goes about its feeding routine. (Image: Alex Boersma) © Image: Alex Boersma Diagram showing the blue whale’s heart rate as it goes about its feeding routine. (Image: Alex Boersma)

When foraging for food, filter-feeding blue whales perform energetic lunges to gobble up large volumes of seawater filled with tiny prey. Looking at the ECG results, the blue whale’s heart rate jumped appreciably during these foraging lunges, beating around two-and-a-half times more compared to its slowest rate or bradycardia. This was a demonstration of the whale’s remarkably flexible cardiovascular system, allowing it to perform at the extremes of nature.

Once the whale returned to the surface, its heart rate jumped further still, beating at between 25 to 27 bpm on average. Known as tachycardia, this is when the whale worked to replenish its supply of blood oxygen.

The heart rate profile for the blue whale came as a surprise even to the researchers. The observed bradycardia was 30 to 50 times lower than expected. The low rate was made possible by an elastic-like part of the whale’s body called an aortic arch, according to the new paper. This remarkable piece of whale anatomy transports blood to the outer reaches of the whale’s gigantic body, contracting slowly to maintain blood flow during the long interval between beats. The heart’s unique pulsations and shape keeps blood flowing and is what makes the whale’s higher heart rate possible.

During tachycardia, the blue whale’s heart rate is likely working at the highest maximum limit allowable by the constraints of biology, according to the authors. A more robust cardiovascular system is not likely, they argue, and the new research may actually explain why no species on Earth has grown bigger than the blue whale.

Looking ahead, the researchers would like to used accelerometers to monitor the speed of the blue whales in relation to their heart rate. They’d also like to use their ECG suction cup device to measure the heart rate of fin whales, humpback whales, and minke whales.

Beached sperm whale found with 100kg of rubbish inside its stomach .
Researchers found netting, rope, plastic cups, bags, gloves, packing straps and plastic tubing in a huge ball inside the sperm whale's stomach after it beached on the shores of Scotland's Western Isles.The Scottish Marine Animal Strandings Scheme said researchers performed an autopsy on the young whale at the weekend after it stranded itself and died on a beach on the island of Harris in the Western Isles last week.

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