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Tech & Science Secure Your Gadgets With Mozilla's 'Privacy Not Included' List

04:45  26 november  2019
04:45  26 november  2019 Source:   lifehacker.com.au

How To Not Get Phished When Shopping Online

  How To Not Get Phished When Shopping Online Online shopping has made holiday gift buying almost stupidly easy, but as convenient as it is, it’s also a lot easier for hackers and scammers to phish your financial data if you aren’t being careful. Phishing scams have been around since the earliest days of the internet, but a recent report published by data security firm Venafi notes that fake websites are on the rise. These sites, pretending to be popular retailers like Amazon, even outnumber the real ones (go figure). Venafi’s figures get even more alarming if you factor in pages masquerading as social media sites, banks, email services, and other web apps.

Even Mozilla has released its own take, but instead of making it a list of products to buy, the organization has compiled the most popular gadget gifts and identified which of them are secure and trustworthy. It' s called Privacy Not Included , and it will tell you if a particular device can spy on you

Mozilla is a nonprofit organization fighting for a healthy interent. We created this guide to help you shop for safe, secure connected products. The 😮 below shows how creepy users find these products.

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If you need a little help figuring out how to lock down your smart home devices (or those you’re considering purchasing), Mozilla is here to help. I recommend spending some time scanning through its “Privacy Not Included” list and bookmarking the pages for any devices you own. Not only does the site round up all the critical privacy information for your own gadgets, it also gives you an idea of which devices might feel a little creepy to purchase as holiday gifts.

Security experts say these are the 7 'creepiest' smart gadgets people give as holiday gifts

  Security experts say these are the 7 'creepiest' smart gadgets people give as holiday gifts Internet-enabled "smart" devices collect intimate personal data from inside your home, and it can be hard to tell whether that data is kept private and secure. "Privacy Not Included" is a gift guide from the nonprofit Mozilla published Tuesday that ranks smart devices based on "creepiness" and indicates whether they meet basic security standards. The project ranked 76 connected devices and found that 7 didn't meet minimum security standards that "every company should take to protect consumer privacy." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Mozilla ’ s “ Privacy Not Included ” guide, now in its second year, rates 70 products, ranging from toys and smart speakers to a sous vide, across multiple categories. It’s also rolling out—along with advocacy groups Internet Society and Consumers International—new “minimum security requirements,” and

I recommend spending some time scanning through its “ Privacy Not Included ” list and Not only does the site round up all the critical privacy information for your own gadgets , it also gives What I like most about Mozilla ’ s list is that it’s not just a popularity contest. In fact, four of the five devices I

In other words, you might not want to buy your siblings a Facebook Portal this year. That’s not to say it’s a bad device—just that it earns top honours for being the creepiest device on Mozilla’s list, as voted by the site’s visitors. Joining it are the Ring Indoor Cam, Amazon’s Echo Show, the Google Home (surprising, given that it’s a speaker without a camera), and the Nest Cam Indoor Security Camera—to name a few.

What I like most about Mozilla’s list is that it’s not just a popularity contest. In fact, four of the five devices I just mentioned get a mark from Mozilla for meeting its “minimum security standards,” even though its users find them incredibly creepy to use:

We realise people want to just know which products are safe and which aren’t. We are Mozilla—not a consumer product review company—so we won’t say ‘Buy this, don’t buy that.’ Instead, we used our technical expertise to create a set of Minimum Security Standards we think all products should meet in order to be sold in stores. Those standards include using encryption, automatic security updates, requiring strong passwords, having a system to manage vulnerabilities, and having an accessible privacy policy.

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Well, this year, Mozilla has done us all a solid and created a guide to help you buy safe, secure products this holiday season, having taken a look What the guide does do: list whether or not a given gadget got basic privacy / security right. Mozilla included an emoji slider where users can record

Mozilla is a nonprofit organization fighting for a healthy interent. If you're a member of the press interested in learning more about * Privacy Not Included , please email Corey Nord at corey@pkpr.com. 2017 | ABC San Francisco: Your privacy may be at risk with some toys, gadgets .

I also love that you can click through any product on Mozilla’s list to see a full breakdown of which parts of Mozilla’s “minimum security standards” the device does or does not meet (and why). You also get a small information box that tells you how the device “snoops” on you (if at all), as well as a fairly detailed breakdown of how a particular device (and parent company) handles various privacy-related concerns:

a screenshot of a social media post: Screenshot: David Murphy © Screenshot: David Murphy Screenshot: David Murphy

Mozilla also gives you direct links to the company’s privacy pages and settings (where applicable), a list of all the different ways you can contact the company if you have an issue, and a summary of the device’s creepiness in an easy-to-decipher fashion.

a screenshot of a cell phone: Screenshot: David Murphy © Screenshot: David Murphy Screenshot: David Murphy

While my understanding is that Mozilla updates this list of devices once a year or so, I think it’s absolutely worth bookmarking the various profile pages for devices you own, might buy, or have seen your technologically challenged loved ones attempt to set up. This way, you’ll have everything you need to stay as safe and secure as possible even if you’re interested in a gadget that most other people find creepy. And for those who don’t know the first thing about privacy, and what it means for the smart device they just picked up, Mozilla’s all-in-one advice is incredibly useful—if not eye-opening.

Uninstall These Snooping AVG And Avast Browser Extensions .
We always recommend keeping your extension list light, because you never know when something might try to siphon data from your browser—especially more data than it should be able to access. That’s exactly the issue Mozilla is raising with four seemingly “good” extensions—Avast Online Security, AVG Online Security, Avast SafePrice, and AVG SafePrice—and you should uninstall them from your browser until they’ve been fixed, at minimum. As ZDNet reports, Mozilla removed these four extensions from its online gallery following reports from AdBlock Plus’ creator, Wladimir Palant, that the extensions were collecting more data than they should.

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