•   
  •   

Tech & Science China introduces mandatory face scans for phone users

14:45  01 december  2019
14:45  01 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

Gmail's Smart Compose is coming to Google Docs

  Gmail's Smart Compose is coming to Google Docs The automatic predictive text suggestions which Gmail offers users while they compose emails is launching for Google Docs. In 2018, Google launched Smart Compose in Gmail for G Suite users; now, the feature is coming to Google Docs. Smart Compose is a tool that helps users compose emails by intelligently autocompleting the message based on an individual's writing habits. For example, "it can fill in common phrases and relevant addresses, like that of your home and office." Over time, the feature makes suggestions more and more tailored to each person. © Courtesy of Google Google launches Smart Compose in beta for Google Docs.

China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday In early November, a Chinese professor filed a claim against a safari park in Hangzhou, eastern Zhejiang province for requiring face scans for entry, according to the local court.

China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday In early November, a Chinese professor filed a claim against a safari park in Hangzhou, eastern Zhejiang province for requiring face scans for entry, according to the local court.

China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday, according to the country's information technology authority, as Beijing continues to tighten cyberspace controls.

a hand holding a cellphone: China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting on November 30.© hocus-focus / Istock.com China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting on November 30. In September, China's industry and information technology ministry issued a notice on "safeguarding the legitimate rights and interests of citizens online", which laid out rules for enforcing real-name registration.

Twitter now lets you enable 2FA without asking for your phone number

  Twitter now lets you enable 2FA without asking for your phone number Time to get yourself an authentication appThis is a very positive development from Twitter. Not only is SMS vulnerable to SIM-swapping attacks (just ask Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey), but Twitter also recently admitted to “unintentionally” using people’s phone numbers for advertising purposes. Authentication apps are more secure, and you can use them without having to give any more personal details to Twitter than you absolutely need to.

China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday In early November, a Chinese professor filed a claim against a safari park in Hangzhou, eastern Zhejiang province for requiring face scans for entry, according to the local court.

China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday, according to the country's In early November, a Chinese professor filed a claim against a safari park in Hangzhou, eastern Zhejiang province for requiring face scans for entry

The notice said telecom operators should use "artificial intelligence and other technical means" to verify people's identities when they take a new phone number.

A China Unicom customer service representative told AFP that the December 1 "portrait matching" requirement means customers registering for a new phone number may have to record themselves turning their head and blinking.

"In next steps, our ministry will continue to...increase supervision and inspection...and strictly promote the management of real-name registration for phone users," said the September notice.

Though the Chinese government has pushed for real-name registration for phone users since at least 2013 -- meaning ID cards are linked to new phone numbers -- the move to leverage AI comes as facial recognition technology gains traction across China where the tech is used for everything from supermarket checkouts to surveillance.

China used a file-sharing app to round up 40,000 Uighur Muslims for prison camps, a startling insight into how it oppresses people via technology

  China used a file-sharing app to round up 40,000 Uighur Muslims for prison camps, a startling insight into how it oppresses people via technology The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) published leaked documents detailing China's coordinated crackdown on the Uighur Muslim minority. One document described how authorities rounded up 40,557 people who were identified as having shared banned content via the file-sharing app named Zapya.Zapya encourages users to download the Quran and share religious teachings, the ICIJ reported. China sees Uighurs' religion as a threat.The document ordered officials to investigate all 40,557 people "one by one," and send them to "concentrated training" unless they could prove themselves innocent.

China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday, according to the country's information technology authority, as Beijing continues to tighten cyberspace controls.

BEIJING: China will require telecom operators to collect face scans when registering new phone users at offline outlets starting Sunday, according to the country’s information technology authority, as Beijing continues to tighten cyberspace controls.

Online, Chinese social media users reacted with a mix of support and worry over the December 1 facial verification notice, with some voicing concerns their biometric data could be leaked or sold.

"This is a bit too much," wrote one user on Twitter-like Weibo, commenting under an article about the new rules.

"Control, and then more control," posted another.

While researchers have warned of the privacy risks associated with gathering facial recognition data, consumers have widely embraced the technology -- though China saw one of its first lawsuits on facial recognition last month.

In early November, a Chinese professor filed a claim against a safari park in Hangzhou, eastern Zhejiang province for requiring face scans for entry, according to the local court.

In addition to mobile users, Chinese social media site Weibo was forced to roll out real-name registration in 2012.

Oversight of social media has ramped up in recent years as part of the Chinese government's push to "promote the healthy, orderly development of the Internet, protect state security and public interest".

Student prescribed Voltaren for undiagnosed brain tumour .
When Caroline Pippett complained to a doctor about constant headaches she was told it was stress from her final nursing exams and prescribed Voltaren. A week later she was dead. Bruce Pippett takes a deep breath. It's been 14 years since his daughter passed away from a rare brain tumour in her frontal lobe at just 26. For him, it feels like yesterday. Mr Pippett is speaking out now to push for mandatory brain scans for those suffering from persistent headaches, after reading a 9News article about Western Australian mum Liz Heffernan.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!