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Tech & Science Growth in global carbon emissions slowed in 2019: report

02:50  04 december  2019
02:50  04 december  2019 Source:   reuters.com

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"The weak growth in carbon dioxide emissions in 2019 is due to an unexpected decline in global coal use, but this drop is insufficient to overcome Published by the Global Carbon Project research group in several academic journals, including Nature Climate Change, the report represents the first

The new emissions figures, reported by the Global Carbon Project and published simultaneously in three scientific journals, arrived as diplomats from In the United States, carbon dioxide emissions are on track to fall roughly 1.7 percent in 2019 , thanks to a sharp decline in coal-fired electricity.

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By Matthew Green

MADRID (Reuters) - A surprise drop in coal use in the United States and Europe has helped to slow the growth of global carbon dioxide emissions this year, with softening demand in China and India also contributing, according to a study published on Wednesday.

The report, launched at a U.N. climate summit in Madrid, showed that growing appetite for oil and gas meant the world was still far from achieving the drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions needed to avert catastrophic global warming.

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Oil Market Report . World Energy Investment 2019 . Despite growth in coal use, fuel switching between coal and gas accelerated in 2018, reducing the carbon intensity of global energy use. Despite continued growth in emissions , the power sector has seen significant transformation in

Global emissions increased from 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide in 1900 to over 36 billion tonnes 115 years later. In addition to the commonly reported production-based emissions statisticians also calculate It wasn’t until the late 1800s that we begin to see a growth in emissions from oil and gas

Nevertheless, coal use fell sharply in the United States and Europe, helping slow the projected growth in carbon dioxide emissions to 0.6% in 2019 compared with 2.1% the previous year.

Slower growth in demand in China, which burns half the world's coal, and India, combined with overall weaker economic growth, also helped slow the upward march of emissions, said the report, known as the Global Carbon Budget 2019.

"The weak growth in carbon dioxide emissions in 2019 is due to an unexpected decline in global coal use, but this drop is insufficient to overcome the robust growth in natural gas and oil consumption," said Glen Peters, research director at Oslo-based climate research centre CICERO.

Peters added that global C02 emissions from fossil fuels were likely to be more than 4% higher in 2019 than in 2015, the year when the Paris Agreement to tackle climate change was adopted.

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This is a list of sovereign states and territories by carbon dioxide emissions due to certain forms of human activity, based on the EDGAR database created by European Commission and Netherlands

Global carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels did not grow in 2015 and are projected to rise only slightly in 2016, marking three years of almost no It shows emissions growth remained below 1 per cent despite GDP growth exceeding 3 per cent. Decreased use of coal in China is the main reason

Published by the Global Carbon Project research group in several academic journals, including Nature Climate Change, the report represents the first full-year estimate of the increase in carbon dioxide emissions in 2019.

The authors said that recent growth in renewable energy and electric vehicles had served -- at best -- to merely slow the growth in fossil fuel emissions, which must fall rapidly if the world is to meet temperature goals in the Paris accord.

The study also estimated that emissions from forest fires and other land-use changes rose in 2019 to 6 billion tonnes of CO2, about 0.8 billion tonnes more than the previous year, driven partly by fires in the Amazon and Indonesia.

Joeri Rogelj, a lecturer in climate change at the Grantham Institute, Imperial College London, downplayed the long-term significance of annual fluctuations in emissions growth.

"The small slowdown this year is really nothing to be overly enthusiastic about," Rogelj said. "If no structural change underlies this slowdown than science tells us that emissions will simply gradually continue to increase on average."

(Reporting by Matthew Green; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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