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Tech & Science Time to dig out corruption in the resource industry

23:48  08 december  2019
23:48  08 december  2019 Source:   theage.com.au

More than 100 horses linked to corruption accused WA bureaucrat surface in Australia, new Zealand

  More than 100 horses linked to corruption accused WA bureaucrat surface in Australia, new Zealand The thoroughbred stallions, mares and foals are currently in a legal limbo after the Corruption and Crime Commission froze the pair's assets amid allegations they had defrauded the state of up to $40 million using a fake invoicing scheme. But the McGowan Government and Racing and Wagering WA are developing a welfare strategy to care for the horses stabled in WA, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand.The plan will likely involve a new $1.6 million Dardanup property purchased by RWWA to house retiring racehorses.

Corruption is a problem all over the world. Here are some industries that consistently rank high on Extraction companies search all over the world for valuable resource deposits to dig up and sell. The bidding process for projects in the extraction and construction industries is known to be an area

Corruption is a form of dishonesty or criminal activity undertaken by a person or organization entrusted with a position of authority, often to acquire illicit benefit, or

a person holding a sign: Despite eight years of investigations no charges have yet been laid against Leighton Holdings in Australia.© Bloomberg Despite eight years of investigations no charges have yet been laid against Leighton Holdings in Australia.

It's been 2856 days since news broke of the AFP’s investigation into Australian company Leighton Holdings for bribing Iraqi’s oil ministerin an attempt to win a $US733 million oil contract. After an exhausting eight years of investigations, no charges have been laid in Australia. This points to a bigger problem - most Australian companies that engage in corruption can expect to get away with it.

Today, Monday December 9, marks the United Nations' International Anti-Corruption Day, but it seems we are swimming in a sea of corruption where the big fish act with impunity. While this may not mean much to you, every year $US1 trillion is paid in bribes while an estimated $3.8 trillion is stolen through corruption. Funds lost to corruption are estimated at 10 times the amount of overseas aid.

Woman becomes third person charged over alleged multi-million-dollar WA public sector fraud

  Woman becomes third person charged over alleged multi-million-dollar WA public sector fraud A 45-year-old Perth woman becomes the third person to be charged over an alleged multi-million-dollar corruption scandal that has reached the highest levels of WA's Department of Communities.A 45-year-old woman is facing nine charges of official corruption, stemming from the allegations previously laid against former senior public executive Paul Whyte and another man, Jacob Anthonisz.

Analysis of corruption in natural resources is heavily influenced by the resource curse paradigm emphasizing the distorting effects of resource From an anti- corruption perspective, a geographic concentration in extractive industry activity towards country contexts that score poorly on formal

The upcoming board meeting of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) on 24-25 October, where leaders meet to increase The case is a painful but vital reminder that the world’s efforts to stamp out corruption in the gas, oil and mining industries still carry crucial blind spots.

Corruption and tax avoidance are not endemic to a specific country or region. However, as The Age’s investigations into Unaoil, Iluka and Leighton Holdings show, they are rampant in the mining, oil and gas industries. They are often enabled by jurisdictions that allow companies to operate in secrecy. In 2014, the OECD identified the mining, oil and gas industries as the world’s most corrupt economic sector.

Australian mining, oil and gas companies have significant operations in Australia and overseas. Our 2017 report found more than 717 ASX-listed extractive companies in 106 countries. Mining, oil and gas deals are vital to "resource-rich" countries in our region including Timor-Leste, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. In these countries - which also receive large amounts of Australian aid - the extractive industries represent a significant portion of GDP and comprise a large share of exports. Tax revenues from natural resources fund public services such as schools, hospitals and clean water. Corruption is literally taking money and services from the people who need them most.

Whyte corruption: Female bookkeeper charged over multi-million-dollar scam

  Whyte corruption: Female bookkeeper charged over multi-million-dollar scam Police investigating Western Australia's biggest public sector theft have charged a third person over the alleged corruption.The 45-year-old woman is believed to be a bookkeeper, who police say "acted in concert" with sacked senior public servant Paul Whyte, 56, and physiotherapist Jacob Anthonisz, 43.

The case is a painful but vital reminder that the world’s efforts to stamp out corruption in the gas, oil and mining industries still carry crucial blind There are precedents for this in other EITI member countries. In Indonesia, our PWYP colleagues have been closely involved in the government’s pledge

" Corruption in the Nigerian context is endemic, because it permeates all stratas of the society. You can find corruption everywhere you actually dig into in the daily life activities of Nigerians. So you find somebody is actually in oil, but is also in banking, at the same time he's in manufacturing, he is in

Australia is a giant player in extractives, but on battling corruption we are a minnow and are being left behind in the race for transparency and accountability. Over the past seven years, Transparency International found that Australia dropped 8 points in the global Corruption Perceptions Index ranking. Along with allegations that Australian companies operating overseas continue to participate in corruption and bribery internationally, we have seen politically exposed persons engage in corrupt behaviour in the awarding of extractive licenses in Australia.

Australia doesn't have a public register that lists who controls or ultimately owns mining or infrastructure companies. If we did have a free and open register, we would know who profits, where they pay taxes, and what potential conflicts and inappropriate relationships exist.

Unlike the European Union, United Kingdom, Norway and Canada, we don’t have laws or regulations requiring companies to report on their payments to foreign countries where they operate mining, gas and oil projects. The OECD states that transparent reporting of data is one of the main ways to counteract corruption in the extractive sector.

Corruption-accused civil servant Paul Whyte's arrest a 'moment of crisis' that lost public trust

  Corruption-accused civil servant Paul Whyte's arrest a 'moment of crisis' that lost public trust The head of WA's Department of Communities says Paul Whyte's arrest was a "moment of crisis" that sent "shockwaves" through the workforce, and a lot of work is required to restore public confidence in the organisation.Mr Whyte, 56, was last month charged with two counts of official corruption over allegations he falsified invoices to steal $2.5 million dollars in public funds.

Industry -led efforts include pilot schemes by the Electronics Industry Citizenship Coalition and the Industry figures such as Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs have suggested that it is a highly difficult The atmosphere of endemic insecurity and corruption makes it difficult for outside observers to

A long-awaited bill ends uncertainty, but will hit mining companies’ profits.

The Australian government, while a generous supporter of transparency and tackling corruption in the extractive industries in developing countries, has put the handbrake on signing up to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, which is known as the global standard for governance of natural resources.

The lack of transparency and publicly available data casts a shadow over the operations of Australian mining, gas and oil companies. It also makes it harder for governments and citizens in foreign countries to know whether they are getting a fair share of the benefits from natural resources.

It’s time for the Australian government to dig out corruption so that companies like Leighton Holdings, now known as CIMIC, are brought to justice. For a start our politicians can lift the veil on company ownership, sign up to the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative, and legislate so that Australian mining, gas and oil companies publish their payments to governments in countries where they extract natural resources.

Clancy Moore is national director of Publish What You Pay Australia, a coalition of humanitarian, faith-based, environmental, trade union, anti-corruption and research organisations calling for greater transparency and accountability in the extractive industries.

Police passing 'inside information' to bikie gangs: watchdog .
Law Enforcement Conduct Commission head Michael Adams, QC, has told an inquiry there must be "significant corruption" within NSW Police.Michael Adams, QC, chief commissioner of the Law Enforcement Conduct Commission, made the comments during a NSW parliamentary inquiry into budget constraints of oversight bodies, with the organisation claiming its investigative capabilities are "under threat" from $6 million in cuts to its $22.3 million trove over the next four years.

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