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Tech & Science An architect who designs homes for the wealthy built a Miami Beach mansion on a 13-foot platform to protect it from the risk of rising ocean levels. Here's a look inside the $27 million home.

20:45  12 december  2019
20:45  12 december  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

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a train is parked on the side of a building: The $US27 million home was built on a platform and stilts in a Miami Beach gated community. The $US27 million home was built on a platform and stilts in a Miami Beach gated community.
  • An architect who designs homes for the wealthy built a Miami Beach mansion on a 13-foot platform to protect it from the risk of rising ocean levels.
  • Miami could be partially underwater and unlivable within 80 years, science indicates.
  • The 12,700-square-foot home, which was built on a platform and stilts, just hit the market for $US27 million, Douglas Elliman exclusively told Business Insider.
  • It includes an elevator, gym, wine cave, an outdoor kitchen, a whirlpool spa, and 78-foot swimming pool with two cabanas.
  • Staff quarters, a four-car garage, and a game room sit underneath the platform.
  • It also comes with more than $US1 million worth of custom-made furniture.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Miami, one of the most-visited cities in the world, could be partially underwater and unlivable within 80 years, according to scientists.

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Miami and Miami Beach already struggle with serious flooding related to sea-level rise, even when there is no rain. The flat, low-lying areas are surrounded by rising seas, and the ground underneath is mostly porous limestone, which means water will eventually rise through it.

But that hasn't stopped the wealthy from continuing to flock to the sunny Florida city and buying up luxury real estate.

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More and more high-net-worth individuals and families from high-tax states like New York, New Jersey, California, and Illinois are moving to the Miami area to take advantage of Florida's status as a no-income-tax state. And many of them want to be in prime waterfront locations, Dora Puig, the top real-estate broker in Miami, told Business Insider earlier this year.

Enter Max Strang, a Florida architect who designs oceanfront homes for the wealthy with rising sea levels in mind. One of Strang's recent creations, a 12,700-square-foot Miami Beach mansion, sits on an elevated platform and stilts 13 feet above sea level. It just hit the market for $US27 million, Douglas Elliman exclusively told Business Insider.

Eloy Carmenate and Mick Duchon of Douglas Elliman hold the listing for the seven-bedroom home, which includes 7,400 square feet of terrace space and 151 feet of waterfront.

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Take a look inside the elevated Miami Beach mansion.

Miami could be partially underwater and unlivable within 80 years, science indicates.

a view of a city at nightMiami and Miami Beach already struggle with serious flooding related to sea-level rise, even when there is no rain. The flat, low-lying areas are surrounded by rising seas, and the ground underneath is mostly porous limestone, which means water will eventually rise through it.

But despite the bleak predictions, wealthy buyers are still snapping up luxury waterfront real estate.

One architect, Max Strang, designs oceanfront homes for the wealthy with rising sea levels in mind.

a boat is docked next to a body of water: An aerial view of the elevated Miami Beach home under construction. An aerial view of the elevated Miami Beach home under construction.

One of Strang's recent creations is a Miami Beach mansion that sits on an elevated platform and stilts with the first floor 13 feet above sea level.

Strang told Architectural Digest in 2018 that the solution to rising waters in Miami is to build elevated homes - and that responsibility is on individual homeowners.

"The wealthy are already doing it," Strang told the publication. "One of my clients in Fort Lauderdale spent a million dollars just on dirt and a seawall to elevate his property."

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Strang's newest design just hit the market for $US27 million, Douglas Elliman exclusively told Business Insider.

a bridge over a body of water: An aerial view of the finished home. An aerial view of the finished home.

It sits in the gated Sunset Islands community in Miami Beach.

The home has 12,700 square feet of interior living space.

a palm tree in front of a house

The Italian developer, Valerio Morabito, tapped Michele Bonan as the interior designer.

The primary building materials are teakwood, glass and stone.

a living room filled with furniture and a large window

Floor-to-ceiling windows let in the Florida sunshine.

a living room filled with furniture and a large window

The home has seven bedrooms ...

a living room filled with furniture and a large window

... as well as seven bathrooms and three powder rooms.

a double sink and large mirror

The home comes with more than $US1 million worth of furniture designed by Bonan, the interior designer, according to Douglas Elliman.

a living room filled with furniture and a large window

Outside is a private 78-foot swimming pool.

a train is parked on the side of a building: The $US27 million home was built on a platform and stilts in a Miami Beach gated community. The $US27 million home was built on a platform and stilts in a Miami Beach gated community.

There are two cabanas by the pool.

a pool next to a palm tree

A teak deck overlooks the more than 150 feet of private waterfront.

a room with a wooden fence

The home mixes Italian vintage with new modern styles, according to publicity materials.

a living room filled with furniture and vase of flowers on a table

The open living area overlooks the canal.

a room filled with furniture and a fireplace

The Miami Beach home comes with a wine cave, a gym ...

a close up of a book shelf

... and an elevator. Staff quarters, a four-car garage, a game room, and home theatre sit underneath the first-floor platform.

a glass door

The architect says more homes should be built like this elevated Miami Beach home to prepare for rising sea levels.

a large empty room

When designing a new house, Strang shows his clients a cross-section of their house and puts dotted lines through it indicating a one-foot sea-level rise, a two-foot rise, etc, he told Architectural Digest.

"The hope is that they will agree to raise the house a few feet," Strang said. But with city-mandated height restrictions, that would mean having low ceilings, which "nobody wants," he added.

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