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Tech & Science Quadrantid meteor shower looks like pure magic in astronaut's view from ISS

05:46  07 january  2020
05:46  07 january  2020 Source:   cnet.com

NASA astronaut Christina Koch sets a new record in space

  NASA astronaut Christina Koch sets a new record in space Christina Koch passes Peggy Whitson's 288-day mark on Saturday to set a new record for longest single space flight by a female astronaut.Astronaut Christina Koch, launched to the International Space Station on March 15, marks her 289th day in space Saturday, breaking retired astronaut Peggy Whitson's world record for the longest single space flight by a woman.

The Quadrantid meteor shower gave ISS astronauts quite a show . Koch' s view is a multi-layered delight. It has the scenic meteor streaks, a glittering puddle of city lights and the ectoplasm-green glow of the Northern Lights aurora along the horizon.

The Quadrantid meteor shower is not as well-known as other meteor showers like the Geminids or Orionids, because the meteors are fainter and easier Related: Amazing Quadrantid Meteor Shower Photos by Stargazers. Photographer Jeff Berkes captured several Quadrantid meteors in this

The Quadrantid meteor shower gave ISS astronauts quite a show. NASA/Christina Koch © Provided by CNET The Quadrantid meteor shower gave ISS astronauts quite a show. NASA/Christina Koch

Us Earth-bound folks got to experience the annual Quadrantid meteor shower this month as a show of bright lights shooting across the dark night sky. The astronauts on board the International Space Station saw these same meteors, but with a very different backdrop.

"Can you see shooting starts [sic] from space? Turns out, yes!" NASA astronaut Christina Koch tweeted on Monday along with a composite image showing what the Quadrantids look like from space. 

Koch's view is a multi-layered delight. It has the scenic meteor streaks, a glittering puddle of city lights and the ectoplasm-green glow of the Northern Lights aurora along the horizon.

The ISS crew witnesses and documents what's happening down below, both tragedies and wonders. This meteor shower definitely counts as a wonder.

A meteor that struck Australia brought indestructible stardust more ancient than the sun. It's the oldest solid material ever found on Earth. .
In 1969, a 4.6-billion-year-old meteorite struck Murchison, Australia. The meteorite contained fragments of stardust called presolar grains. This stardust is between between 5 billion and 7 billion years old - older than the sun and our solar system. Most of the grains in the Murchison meteorite came from various stars that formed around the same time. This suggests stars are born in bursts, rather than at a constant rate. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Meteorite fragments found in Australia appear to have brought rare, interstellar passengers to Earth: pieces of stardust older than the sun.

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