•   
  •   

Tech & Science Scientists Have Successfully Built a Particle Accelerator Onto a Silicon Chip

15:52  11 january  2020
15:52  11 january  2020 Source:   sciencealert.com

The US is building its first new particle collider in decades on Long Island. Stephen Hawking called the technology a 'time machine.'

  The US is building its first new particle collider in decades on Long Island. Stephen Hawking called the technology a 'time machine.' A new particle collider is set to be built at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island, New York. Particle colliders smash charged particles against one another at nearly the speed of light to reveal some of their fundamental properties. The only operating one in the US is Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. It will shut down in 2024 to make room for the new machine, which could be operational by 2030. Visit Businessinsider.com for more stories. A machine that will investigate the forces that hold matter together finally has a home.

A new particle accelerator on a chip could soon change that. The world’s biggest particle So in 2015, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation awarded Stanford University .5 million to build a Now, researchers have developed a tiny silicon chip smaller than the width of a human hair that can

An early prototype of the silicon - chip -sized particle accelerator that physicists at Stanford are working on. But scientists in California think small is beautiful. They want to build an accelerator on An accelerator built that way won't achieve the energy of its much larger cousins, but it could accelerate

a close up of a light© Neil Sapra

Particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are incredibly useful – and usually incredibly huge – instruments for studying some of the fundamentals of particle physics. But now scientists have managed to squeeze one on to a silicon chip.

It's nowhere near as powerful as the bigger versions, as you might expect, but the new particle accelerator chip could still be very helpful for researchers who aren't able to access gigantic particle accelerator setups.

While this first model is only a prototype, the team behind it is hopeful that it's a first step towards providing a more compact alternative to the well-known massive particle accelerators, including the LHC and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

A Major New Particle Collider Is Coming To New York

  A Major New Particle Collider Is Coming To New York The U.S. Department of Energy has decided on the final location of a major upcoming American particle collider: Brookhaven National Lab on Long Island in New York. The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed particle accelerator that will slam electrons into the nuclei of heavy atoms, with the goal of better understanding nuclear structure and the force that holds atoms together. Two national laboratories, Brookhaven and Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Virginia, had been vying for the $US1 ($1) billion+ experiment. Each location offered an existing experiment that would be incorporated into the EIC.

But particle accelerators are expensive, require scientists to travel from locations all over the world and cannot accommodate all the researchers who A laser-driven accelerator engraved in silicon , however, would be easier to scale up, and multiple components could potentially fit on the same chip .

To build the particle accelerator prototype, the team created a nanoscale silicon channel, vacuum-sealed it, inserted electrons, and used the infrared laser The research described in this article was published in Science Vol. 367, Issue 6473 as “On- chip integrated laser-driven particle accelerator .”

"The largest accelerators are like powerful telescopes," says electrical engineer Jelena Vuckovic, from Stanford University. "There are only a few in the world and scientists must come to places like SLAC to use them."

"We want to miniaturise accelerator technology in a way that makes it a more accessible research tool."

To achieve this, the researchers turned to the much shorter wavelengths of lasers rather than the conventional microwave acceleration used at SLAC.

They carved a nanoscale channel out of silicon – less than the width of a human hair – sealed it in a vacuum, and then propelled electrons through it using pulses of infrared light (silicon appears transparent to infrared light beams).

The researchers used what they describe as an 'inverse' approach to designing the particle accelerator, first figuring out how much light energy they wanted to deliver, and then working backwards to create nanoscale structures capable of delivering it.

Has Hubble Detected Rogue Clumps Of Dark Matter?

  Has Hubble Detected Rogue Clumps Of Dark Matter? Scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope have discovered evidence of small clumps of dark matter warping the light from distant quasars. Regular matter seems to form only a small part of the universe—much more of the matter seems to be “dark” stuff that influences regular matter via gravity but can’t be detected directly. The most widely accepted theory to explain dark matter suggests that it is a slow-moving particle that can form clumps in the universe. New Hubble observations provide evidence of the smallest clumps yet, which will hopefully further guide scientists’ search for the mysterious material.

An early prototype of the silicon - chip -sized particle accelerator that physicists at Stanford are working on. Eventually, miniature accelerators might They want to build an accelerator on semiconductor chips . An accelerator built that way won't achieve the energy of its much larger cousins, but it could

Can the same be done for particle accelerators ? Fiber optics or silicon crystals could be used to build particle pathways, with high-power lasers as In this lecture, Christopher McGuinness shows how scientists are using nanotech fabrication techniques at SLAC to build an accelerator on a chip .

While laser acceleration has been tried before, this is the first time that scientists have been able to get an entire accelerator system built in so small a space, in part due to the computer algorithms that helped in the design of the setup.

a screenshot of a cell phone© Sapra et al/Science

"You not only have to demonstrate the ability to couple the laser light to the electrons in these very small structures, but you have to generate the electrons and have them also be transmitted by the channel," physicist Robert Byer, from Stanford University, told Sophie Bushwick at Scientific American.

The good news is that this should lead to cheaper and easier access to the technology for researchers, who can then apply it in a variety of scenarios covering chemistry, biology and materials science. Those behind the study have likened it to the home PC replacing mainframe computers that used to take up entire rooms.

The research has been published in Science.

Coral is Google’s quiet initiative to enable AI without the cloud .
On-device AI promises to make computers faster and more secureBut applications like this are useful only so long as they’re fast and secure. An AI camera that takes minutes to process images isn’t much use in a factory, and no patient wants to risk the exposure of their medical data if it’s sent to the cloud for analysis.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!