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Tech & Science Apple is offering the FBI 'no substantive assistance' in unlocking two iPhones related to a shooting case, says Attorney General Barr

13:43  14 january  2020
13:43  14 january  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

FBI Asks Apple To Unlock iPhone Of Suspect In Pensacola Naval Base Shooting

  FBI Asks Apple To Unlock iPhone Of Suspect In Pensacola Naval Base Shooting The FBI is seeking Apple’s assistance in unlocking the mobile phone of the gunman authorities say killed three people and wounded eight others last month at a naval base in Pensacola, Florida. Gizmodo has confirmed that FBI General Counsel Dana Boente requested Apple’s help to unlock the mobile phone in a letter sent late Monday after obtaining a court order to search its contents. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

Apple is offering the FBI ' no substantive assistance ' in unlocking two iPhones related to a shooting case , says Attorney General Barr . In 2015, Apple refused a similar request from the agency to unlock an iPhone used by one of the shooters in the San Bernardino case , on the grounds

Attorney General William Barr has joined the FBI in asking Apple to unlock two iPhones belonging to the man who attacked a naval base in Pensacola, Florida, in December. Barr also declared the shooting "an act of terrorism." Apple has given investigators details from Mohammed Saeed

Tim Cook wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Tim Cook at the European Union's privacy conference in Brussels. Tim Cook at the European Union's privacy conference in Brussels.
  • Attorney General William Barr told reporters Monday that Apple has given the FBI "no substantive assistance" in its investigation into a deadly shooting last month at a Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida.
  • The FBI has asked for Apple's help unlocking two iPhones used by the shooter, a request Apple has refused.
  • Apple previously refused a similar request from the FBI following a deadly shooting in San Bernardino, California, setting off a fierce public debate over whether the company should be required to offer the government tools to counter its own encryption technology.
  • Barr's statement Monday indicated that the FBI and Apple are still at odds over the issue, which the company has framed as a matter of preserving users' privacy.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Attorney General William Barr told reporters in a press conference Monday that, "so far, Apple has not given any substantive assistance" to the FBI in its investigation into a deadly shooting at Pensacola, Florida, Naval Air Station.

Apple made a rare appearance at tech's biggest conference and defended encryption on the iPhone

  Apple made a rare appearance at tech's biggest conference and defended encryption on the iPhone Apple made a rare public appearance at the world's biggest tech conference, CES, in Las Vegas. The iPhone maker usually shuns public appearances at industry conferences, but put its most senior privacy executive on stage to defend the company's pro-privacy stance.According to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman, iPhone privacy chief Jane Horvath - who was peaking on a panel at this year's CES tech conference in Las Vegas - said that iPhones' susceptibility to being stolen means they must be encrypted to protect personal information such as financial and health data.

In 2014, Apple started building encryption into iPhones that can be unlocked only with a given device’s As in that case , there is a dead gunman, a court authorization to gain entry to a phone, and an early And Attorney General William P. Barr has recently turned up his criticism of encryption.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said in a Monday statement that Apple has not provided "any "[I] Have an iphone 8 or 7," Garrett wrote to an employee at Cellebrite. The Pensacola shooting investigation "was an opportunity for the FBI to reapproach the same subject as before," Eller said .

The FBI sent a letter to Apple on January 8 asking for its help unlocking two iPhones used by the shooter. On Monday, Barr said that Apple has refused that request.

"When the FBI requested information from us relating to this case a month ago, we gave them all of the data in our possession and we will continue to support them with the data we have available," an Apple spokesperson said last week.

Pensacola shooting was an act of terrorism, attorney general says

  Pensacola shooting was an act of terrorism, attorney general says The FBI and Justice Department say 21 of the gunman’s fellow military trainees will leave the country in the wake of the investigation.US Attorney General William Barr has announced that the December shooting that killed three US sailors on a Florida base was an act of terrorism, as officials revealed harrowing new details about the 15-minute rampage and publicly called out Apple Inc. to help them unlock the killer’s phones.

US attorney general is calling on privacy-minded tech company to unlock iPhones related to a recent shooting at a Florida naval base. The demand for assistance in unlocking a suspected terrorist’s iPhone echoes the 2016 dispute between Apple and the FBI , which sought access to information

US Attorney General William Barr has publicly asked Apple to unlock a pair of iPhones used by The public request by Barr on Monday follows a similar demand by the FBI six days prior, when Apple has provided no " substantive assistance " to the investigation according to Barr , reports the

This is not the first time Apple and the FBI have butt heads on the issue.

In 2015, Apple refused a similar request from the agency to unlock an iPhone used by one of the shooters in the San Bernardino case, on the grounds that doing so would require Apple to give the FBI tools to counter the company's encryption, creating a "backdoor" that could be used to access other devices. The FBI ended up suing Apple for defying the court order, though it ultimately dropped the case after finding a private company to help it unlock the phone.

Agency officials have repeatedly criticised tech companies' use of encryption, saying that it prevents law enforcement from following leads and obtaining evidence that could aid in an investigation.

"This situation perfectly illustrates why it is critical that the public be able to get access to digital evidence once it has obtained a court order based on probable cause," Barr said during the press conference Monday.

Apple Might Replace Your iPhone's Battery Case For Free

  Apple Might Replace Your iPhone's Battery Case For Free If you’ve noticed that your $199 Smart Battery Case is struggling to charge your iPhone, or you can’t really charge the case itself that well (or at all), then you’ve got a defective product on your hands. Apple is aware of these issues and is ready with replacements, and you only have to jump through a single hoop to get one. First, let’s talk eligibility. Apple’s replacement program is only good for the Smart Battery Case on the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, and iPhone XR. And affected cases were manufactured at some point between January and October of 2019. Apple isn’t, however, replacing every case that was sold between this time period.

He said the FBI asked Apple last week to help unlock two iPhones used by the shooter. Apple has refused the request, however, citing a long-standing view that breaking encryption on a single phone would compromise all users' privacy. The dispute is a close parallel to a standoff between Apple and

Apple said the FBI notified the company on Jan. 6 that it needed additional help. On Jan. 8, Apple said it got a subpoena for information related to the second iPhone , which it responded to within While Apple didn’t directly address the issue of unlocking iPhones , it reiterated its argument against

Civil rights and privacy advocates, such as the American Civil Liberties Union, have praised Apple's defence of encryption, arguing that allowing law enforcement access to devices could pose risks for activists, journalists, and persecuted minorities in countries with oppressive regimes.

"There is simply no way for Apple, or any other company, to provide the FBI access to encrypted communications without also providing it to authoritarian foreign governments and weakening our defences against criminals and hackers," the ACLU said in an emailed statement to Business Insider.

Monday's press conference confirmed that, for now, Apple is doubling down what it sees as its commitment to user privacy by refusing to assist the FBI in its investigation.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read the ACLU's full statement below:

"Like four years ago, the government's demand would weaken the security of millions of iPhones, and is dangerous and unconstitutional. Strong encryption enables religious minorities facing genocide, like the Uyghurs in China, and journalists investigating powerful drug cartels in Mexico, to communicate safely with each other, knowledgeable sources, and the outside world. There is simply no way for Apple, or any other company, to provide the FBI access to encrypted communications without also providing it to authoritarian foreign governments and weakening our defences against criminals and hackers."

Latest Rumours Suggest Even More Affordable IPhones Are Coming In 2020 .
Over the past couple of years, Apple has garnered a lot of success by making its entry-level iPhones just a bit more affordable, with the iPhone 11 recently sucking up 39 per cent of all smartphone sales in Q4 2019. And if the latest 2020 iPhone rumours are correct, Apple could release two new affordable iPhones this year instead of just one. According to Japanese Apple enthusiast site Mac Otakara, Apple is planning to offer a total of four new iPhones in 2020 comprised of a 5.4-inch model, two 6.1-inch models, and a premium 6.7-inch iPhone.

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