•   
  •   

Tech & Science Apple is offering the FBI 'no substantive assistance' in unlocking two iPhones related to a shooting case, says Attorney General Barr

13:43  14 january  2020
13:43  14 january  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

Some at FBI reportedly agreed with Tim Cook that Apple offered plenty of help during investigation into terrorist's iPhone, contradicting Attorney General Barr

  Some at FBI reportedly agreed with Tim Cook that Apple offered plenty of help during investigation into terrorist's iPhone, contradicting Attorney General Barr On Monday, Attorney General William Barr slammed Apple, saying that the company had not provided "substantive assistance" in helping the FBI gain access to an iPhone belonging to the gunman who killed three people at a Navy air base in Florida last month. But Apple pushed back against these comments, saying that it had provided "gigabytes" of data as part of the investigation. Some at the FBI agree with Apple, according to a new report in The Wall Street Journal.

Apple is offering the FBI ' no substantive assistance ' in unlocking two iPhones related to a shooting case , says Attorney General Barr . Apple previously refused a similar request from the FBI following a deadly shooting in San Bernardino, California, setting off a fierce public debate over

US Attorney General William Barr has publicly asked Apple to unlock a pair of iPhones used by the gunman who killed three people in Pensacola, Florida The public request by Barr on Monday follows a similar demand by the FBI six days prior, when Apple was asked to help unlock two iPhones

Tim Cook wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Tim Cook at the European Union's privacy conference in Brussels. Tim Cook at the European Union's privacy conference in Brussels.
  • Attorney General William Barr told reporters Monday that Apple has given the FBI "no substantive assistance" in its investigation into a deadly shooting last month at a Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida.
  • The FBI has asked for Apple's help unlocking two iPhones used by the shooter, a request Apple has refused.
  • Apple previously refused a similar request from the FBI following a deadly shooting in San Bernardino, California, setting off a fierce public debate over whether the company should be required to offer the government tools to counter its own encryption technology.
  • Barr's statement Monday indicated that the FBI and Apple are still at odds over the issue, which the company has framed as a matter of preserving users' privacy.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Attorney General William Barr told reporters in a press conference Monday that, "so far, Apple has not given any substantive assistance" to the FBI in its investigation into a deadly shooting at Pensacola, Florida, Naval Air Station.

Apple could be headed for another battle with the FBI after the agency requested help unlocking 2 iPhones belonging to the suspected Florida shooter

  Apple could be headed for another battle with the FBI after the agency requested help unlocking 2 iPhones belonging to the suspected Florida shooter The FBI sent a letter to Apple on Monday asking for help unlocking two iPhones thought to belong to the suspected shooter who killed three people at Pensacola, Florida Naval Air Station last month. The case bears similarities to the San Bernardino shooting of 2015, which led to a major standoff between the FBI and Apple.In the San Bernardino case, Apple refused to help the FBI break the encryption on the shooter's iPhone, saying it would create a security backdoor which would make every other iPhone vulnerable. Eventually the FBI dropped the case after finding an unidentified third party to help it break into the device.

Attorney General William Barr called on Apple to help it unlock two iPhones linked to an attack on a Pensacola naval base. Apple told The Verge that it In 2016, Apple refused a similar request from the FBI to unlock an iPhone linked to the San Bernardino shooting , which led to a months-long and

US Attorney General William Barr said Monday at a news conference that the shooting at a Naval airbase in Pensacola last month was an act of terrorism motivated by jihadist ideology.

The FBI sent a letter to Apple on January 8 asking for its help unlocking two iPhones used by the shooter. On Monday, Barr said that Apple has refused that request.

"When the FBI requested information from us relating to this case a month ago, we gave them all of the data in our possession and we will continue to support them with the data we have available," an Apple spokesperson said last week.

The Justice Department is demanding that Apple make it easier to unlock suspects' iPhones, but experts say they can do that without Apple's cooperation. Here's how.

  The Justice Department is demanding that Apple make it easier to unlock suspects' iPhones, but experts say they can do that without Apple's cooperation. Here's how. The Department of Justice is pressuring Apple to help unlock two iPhones belonging to the Saudi aviation student charged with killing three people at a Florida Navy base last month. Attorney General William Barr has criticised Apple as unhelpful in cracking the locked iPhones. While Apple has provided the FBI with available records from the suspect's iCloud account, it has long resisted federal pressure to engineer a "backdoor" that would let investigators easily unlock iPhones.

Attorney General William Barr told reporters in a press conference Monday that, “so far, Apple has not given any substantive assistance ” to the FBI in its investigation into a deadly Attorney General William Barr says Pensacola base shooting 'an act of terrorism'Today at 2:48 PMwww.cnn.com.

Attorney General William Barr said during a press conference on Monday that Apple had not helped the FBI crack into password protected iPhones "We have asked Apple for their help in unlocking the shooter's iPhones . So far Apple has not given us any substantive assistance ," Barr said , next

This is not the first time Apple and the FBI have butt heads on the issue.

In 2015, Apple refused a similar request from the agency to unlock an iPhone used by one of the shooters in the San Bernardino case, on the grounds that doing so would require Apple to give the FBI tools to counter the company's encryption, creating a "backdoor" that could be used to access other devices. The FBI ended up suing Apple for defying the court order, though it ultimately dropped the case after finding a private company to help it unlock the phone.

Agency officials have repeatedly criticised tech companies' use of encryption, saying that it prevents law enforcement from following leads and obtaining evidence that could aid in an investigation.

"This situation perfectly illustrates why it is critical that the public be able to get access to digital evidence once it has obtained a court order based on probable cause," Barr said during the press conference Monday.

The US government is urging Apple to unlock a gunman's iPhone, but experts explain why that would create a privacy nightmare for iPhone owners

  The US government is urging Apple to unlock a gunman's iPhone, but experts explain why that would create a privacy nightmare for iPhone owners Apple's decision not to unlock or create a backdoor into the iPhones used by a gunman in a Florida shooting last month puts the tech giant at odds with the United States government yet again. Security experts agree, however, that circumventing the iPhone's security poses a significant risk to iPhone users since it would provide a means to obtain private data that even Apple can't presently access. There's a risk that such a tool could fall into the wrong hands, some experts warn. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Apple has hit back after US Attorney General William Barr accused the company of offering no assistance in unlocking devices linked to the Apple previously went head-to-head with the FBI in lengthy legal battle over a similar phone-cracking case related to the 2016 terror attack in San

Attorney General William Barr has joined the FBI in asking Apple to unlock two iPhones belonging to the man who attacked a naval base in However, Apple is said to be standing firm in its support of encryption, which could set it on a path towards another high-profile privacy battle with authorities.

Civil rights and privacy advocates, such as the American Civil Liberties Union, have praised Apple's defence of encryption, arguing that allowing law enforcement access to devices could pose risks for activists, journalists, and persecuted minorities in countries with oppressive regimes.

"There is simply no way for Apple, or any other company, to provide the FBI access to encrypted communications without also providing it to authoritarian foreign governments and weakening our defences against criminals and hackers," the ACLU said in an emailed statement to Business Insider.

Monday's press conference confirmed that, for now, Apple is doubling down what it sees as its commitment to user privacy by refusing to assist the FBI in its investigation.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read the ACLU's full statement below:

"Like four years ago, the government's demand would weaken the security of millions of iPhones, and is dangerous and unconstitutional. Strong encryption enables religious minorities facing genocide, like the Uyghurs in China, and journalists investigating powerful drug cartels in Mexico, to communicate safely with each other, knowledgeable sources, and the outside world. There is simply no way for Apple, or any other company, to provide the FBI access to encrypted communications without also providing it to authoritarian foreign governments and weakening our defences against criminals and hackers."

The FBI Broke Into An iPhone Just A Few Months Ago, Why Does It Need Apple Now? .
Federal officials have called on Apple to unlock a phone belonging to a shooter who killed three people last month at the Pensacola Naval Air Station, but the company has refused to do so, saying there’s “no such thing as a backdoor just for the good guys.” But the FBI has managed to unlock iPhones all on its own in the past, so why can’t the agency do it again? A search warrant obtained by Forbes indicates that investigators were able to use a phone-cracking tool called GrayKey to access information stored on an iPhone 11 Pro Max.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!