•   
  •   

Tech & Science Google Is Going To Charge Cops For Your Data

22:05  25 january  2020
22:05  25 january  2020 Source:   gizmodo.com.au

How To Set Up Your iPhone As A Security Key For Google's 2FA

  How To Set Up Your iPhone As A Security Key For Google's 2FA iOS: If you’re a good Google user, you’re probably used to receiving all sorts of prompts on your device whenever you sign into your account (or in the not-so-great instance when someone else is trying to sign in as you). Android users have been able to use their devices as security keys for some time now, and iPhone users are now finally getting the chance, too. What does that mean? Well, instead of just prompting you to confirm that a login attempt is actually you, you’ll need to be physically near whatever device it is that’s attempting to perform the login.

a close up of a persons face: Google is beginning to charge law enforcement for legal access to data on its users this month. (Photo: Leon Neal, Getty)© Photo: Leon Neal, Getty Google is beginning to charge law enforcement for legal access to data on its users this month. (Photo: Leon Neal, Getty)

Google announced that it was going to start charging law enforcement authorities for legal data disclosure requests, such as subpoenas and search warrants, related to its users. The company receives thousands of petitions from authorities every year and has decided to charge to help “offset the costs” associated with producing the information.

The New York Times reports that Google sent out a notice announcing the new fees, which went into effect on Jan. 13, to law enforcement officials. The fees are legal, as federal law allows companies to charge reimbursement fees for these requests, and they are not new for Google. According to the Times, the company has charged to fulfil legal data requests in the past, and it is not the only company that charges for such work. Cell phone carriers have been charging to fulfil similar legal requests for years.

How to withdraw money from your Google Pay account and transfer it to your bank account or debit card

  How to withdraw money from your Google Pay account and transfer it to your bank account or debit card You can easily withdraw money from your Google Wallet, now known as Google Pay, and transfer the balance to a linked bank account, which will usually be available within a day or less. Google Pay is a simple way to make payments using a credit or debit card linked to your Google account.Google Pay can be used to make purchases on websites, in apps, and even in brick-and-mortar retail locations that accept contactless payments or have the Google Pay icon at the register.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.The platform formerly called Google Wallet is now officially called Google Pay.

Nonetheless, a Google spokesman told the Times that for many years now, the company had not “systematically charged” for these requests.

In the first half of 2019, Google received more than 26,000 data disclosure requests in the U.S. It also received more than 11,000 data preservation requests, or requests to set aside a copy of specific data while the government agency obtains a legal process to obtain the information.

Google’s “Notice of Reimbursement” documented sent to law enforcement officials listed the following prices for different data requests.

  • Subpoena: $US45 ($66)

  • Order: $US150 ($220)

  • Search warrant: $US245 ($359)

  • PRTT (Pen register or trap and trace) order: $US60 ($88)

  • Wiretap order: $US60 ($88)

The Google spokesman told the Times that the company would not charge for requests in some cases, such as child safety investigations and life-threatening emergencies.

Huawei partnered with TomTom for a new map app for its phones after being cut off from Google Maps

  Huawei partnered with TomTom for a new map app for its phones after being cut off from Google Maps Huawei has struck a deal with TomTom to let the navigation company build map services for Huawei phones. New Huawei phones are precluded from pre-installing Google apps, including Google Maps, following the company's blacklisting by the Trump administration in 2019. The company has been taking more and more steps to get ready for its Google-less future.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Huawei's severance from Google has forced it to strike up a partnership with satellite navigation company TomTom, Reuters reports.

Law enforcement can get all sorts of information on users from Google, although the information that Google provides will depend on the legal demand presented. According to Google’s website, local and federal government agencies can request to obtain information created in the past or information created in real-time.

Subpoenas, for instance, will reveal information created in the past. They can require Google to disclose the name a user provided when creating a Gmail address account as well as the IP addresses used to create the account and sign in and sign out. For this last part of information, Google provides the dates and times.

A warrant, which also relates to information created in the past, requires Google to provide data such as a user’s search query information and private content stored in a Google account, such as Gmail messages, documents, photos and YouTube videos.

Google App Beta Reveals New 'Hey Google' Sensitivity Details

  Google App Beta Reveals New 'Hey Google' Sensitivity Details Last year Google got into some hot water when it was discovered that humans were listening to recordings from Assistant users to "improve speech technology". Google subsequently promised to bring in some changes to Assistant, including more control over the sensitivity of its wake words. The latest Google app beta has revealed what that will most likely look like. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

Wiretaps and PRTT orders require Google to hand over information created in real-time. Wiretaps require Google to turn over the content of communication in real-time. PRTT, on the other hand, allows law enforcement agencies to retrieve dialling, routing, addressing and signalling information, but excludes the content of communications. PRTT orders can reveal the phone numbers you dial on your phone or the IP address issued by an ISP.

The news that Google will begin charging to fulfil legal data requests has received mixed responses. Some told the Times that the new fees would prevent excessive surveillance, while others stated that they would hamper smaller law enforcement agencies.

If it does turn out to be a burden on U.S law enforcement, there’s probably a pretty good chance that we’ll hear about it. It’s not like U.S. authorities shy away from fighting with tech companies over issues like these nowadays.

[The New York Times]

Google reveals plans to shut down free tool App Maker .
Google has announced plans to gradually shut down its free App Maker tool by January 2021 due to “low usage”. According to Google’s announcement, App Maker is now considered “no longer under active development”, but “critical bugs are still addressed”.Although existing apps will be available to use until January 19, 2021, users will be unable to create new applications starting on April 15. The news comes on the heel of Google’s acquisition of AppSheet, a similar no-code app development platform.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!