•   
  •   

Tech & Science Kenyan Fossil Shows Chameleons May Have ‘Rafted’ From Mainland Africa To Madagascar

06:31  14 february  2020
06:31  14 february  2020 Source:   gizmodo.com.au

CSIRO researcher issues dire warning for Australian agriculture industry after fall armyworm found on mainland

  CSIRO researcher issues dire warning for Australian agriculture industry after fall armyworm found on mainland A CSIRO researcher studying an invasive moth species, known as fall armyworm, says Australia may struggle to eradicate the creature if it gets a hold on the mainland. Biosecurity Queensland yesterday confirmed to the ABC that a single armyworm moth had been detected at Bamaga at the tip of Cape York. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

It suggested that chameleons likely originated in mainland Africa , rather than in Madagascar . The fossil comes from Rusinga Island, a famous fossil site in Kenya . It is one of the oldest chameleon Rafting chameleons . At the time when the fossilized chameleon lived, the position of Madagascar

Our study of this fossil chameleon skull shows that these chameleons could in fact have originated in Africa . This idea is supported by evidence which The idea is that animals might have used rafts of trees to cross from the continent to the island. Rafting has been suggested for many other lizards, so

a lizard on a branch: Parsons chameleon, Calumma parsonii, in Andasibe - Analamazaotra National Park, Madagascar. (Image: Artush/Shutterstock) Parsons chameleon, Calumma parsonii, in Andasibe - Analamazaotra National Park, Madagascar. (Image: Artush/Shutterstock)

Chameleons (Chamaeleonidae) are a family of unique lizards with unusual characteristics: rapidly extendable tongues, feet with two toes pointing forward and two backward, a prehensile tail, and eyes that can move independently of each other. Many species also have the ability to change the colour of their skin.

There are about 213 species of chameleons in the world. They can be found in Africa, the Middle East, southern India, Sri Lanka and the Mediterranean region of Europe. About half of all species occur in Madagascar, a large African island in the Indian Ocean.

Tim the Elephant, one of Africa's last 'giant tuskers', dies

  Tim the Elephant, one of Africa's last 'giant tuskers', dies Big Tim, a beloved elephant who was one of Africa's last giant "tuskers", has died, the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) said on Wednesday. "Tim was one of Africa's very few Super Tuskers, and an incredible elephant whose presence awed and inspired many. He was one of Kenya's National Treasures."Big Tim's body is being transported to the Kenyan capital Nairobi, where a taxidermist will preserve Tim for display at the national museum, KWS said.

It suggested that chameleons likely originated in mainland Africa , rather than in Madagascar . The fossil comes from Rusinga Island, a famous fossil site in Kenya . It is one of the oldest chameleon At the time when the fossilised chameleon lived, the position of Madagascar relative to Africa was

Our study of this fossil chameleon skull shows that these chameleons could in fact have originated in Africa . This idea is supported by evidence which shows Provided by The Conversation APA citation: Kenyan fossil reveals chameleons may have ' rafted ' from Africa to Madagascar (2020, February

This island is therefore considered to be a centre of diversity for these lizards and there’s a long-held view that chameleons originated on Madagascar and came to mainland Africa through oceanic dispersal: they floated on huge rafts made of trees.

But little is known about how these lizards spread across the world and how they evolved. Their fossil record, the only form of direct evidence about their early evolution and history, is very scant.

A study in 2013 challenged this view. It suggested that chameleons likely originated in mainland Africa, rather than in Madagascar. It did this by analysing genetic information. But a key element was missing: a fossil chameleon of the right age and in the right place. This would give clear evidence of their history and evolution.

Chinese tech giant Baidu has made a maps app that shows the location of coronavirus patients

  Chinese tech giant Baidu has made a maps app that shows the location of coronavirus patients Baidu has introduced a new "epidemic map" feature for its Map app to help users navigate the coronavirus outbreak in China, Abacus reports. The app shows the location of both confirmed and suspected coronavirus patients, as well as travel disruption caused by the various quarantines in force across China. The death toll for the coronavirus reached 638 on Thursday evening, the vast majority of the deaths have occurred in mainland China. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Chinese search engine giant Baidu has integrated the coronavirus outbreak into its Map app.

News Madagascar » Education: Kenyan fossil shows chameleons may have ‘ rafted ’ from mainland Africa to Madagascar . News Madagascar » Education: Indian Navy launches operation 'Vanilla' to provide disaster relief at Madagascar . News channel or source: https

Kenyan fossil shows chameleons may have ‘ rafted ’ from mainland Africa to Madagascar . Andrej Čerňanský, Comenius University, Bratislava. It may come down to the smell of your skin and how heavily you breathe. Saoirse Ronan, from left, Margot Robbie and Greta Gerwig are seen in the

My colleagues and I did research on a chameleon fossil skull from Kenya. The fossil was first discovered in 1992.

We wanted to observe all the elements of the fossil’s skull in detail so that we could place its evolutionary history. The results were a surprise: the chameleon was from a genus that only exists in Madagascar today. Our study of this fossil chameleon skull shows that these chameleons could in fact have originated in Africa. This idea is supported by evidence which shows that ocean currents at the time moved towards Madagascar, allowing animals to make the journey from the continent to the island on rafts made of trees.

African origins

The fossil comes from Rusinga Island, a famous fossil site in Kenya. It is one of the oldest chameleon skull fossils, and the only known complete early Miocene (about 18 million years ago) specimen. It is remarkably complete and well-preserved.

Australians quarantined on Christmas Island to return to mainland

  Australians quarantined on Christmas Island to return to mainland The first Australians evacuated from Wuhan, China, have returned to the Australian mainland after 14 days in quarantine on Christmas Island following the coronavirus outbreak.The 241 people have now been taken home to major cities across the country after being monitored for symptoms.

Kenyan fossil shows chameleons may have ' rafted ' from mainland Africa to Madagascar The Conversation ( Africa )09:33. N.B. Relevance is automatically assessed, so some headlines not qualifying as palaeontology news might appear - please feel free to contact us regarding any

Kenyan fossil shows chameleons may have ‘ rafted ’ from mainland Africa to Madagascar . This fossil find provides strong evidence of an African origin for some Malagasy chameleon lineages. Reconstruction of the ancient environment at the Highlands trace fossil site about 183 million years

However, it’s not been fully freed from the rock and there’s still sediment that fills the whole internal region of the skull. This conceals many bone elements.

We used a micro-CT scanner to give us an x-ray image of all the skull’s internal cavity, including the bones, surfaces and sutures. By looking at these features we could determine which species it most resembled. This modern, non-invasive technology is a very powerful science tool, allowing us to study fossils in a new way.

We found that it was a Calumma species of chameleon – but it was a new one, so we created a new name for it: Calumma benovskyi.

a close up of a map

Since all species of this genus are endemic to Madagascar, and none exist anywhere else in the world today, this fossil uniquely shows that Calumma existed on continental Africa in the past.

Our results challenge the long-held view that chameleons originated from Madagascar and dispersed over water to Africa. It provides strong evidence of an African origin for some Malagasy lineages.

Rafting chameleons

At the time when the fossilised chameleon lived, the position of Madagascar relative to Africa was about the same as it is today. The separation of Madagascar from Africa had already occurred, during the age of dinosaurs, approximately 150 million years ago.

Archer out of Sri Lanka Tour and IPL after injury setback

  Archer out of Sri Lanka Tour and IPL after injury setback Archer out of Sri Lanka Tour and IPL after injury setbackThe 24-year-old was injured in England's first test against South Africa last month and underwent scans on his elbow on Wednesday that confirmed he had suffered a low-grade stress fracture.

Kenyan fossil reveals chameleons may have ' rafted ' from Africa to Madagascar http Fossil fuel use and emissions are at record highs because business-as-usual and conventional policy The locust invasion in the Horn of Africa may soon spread to other countries. Cyril Piou shares his insights on

Kenyan fossil reveals chameleons may have ' rafted ' from Africa to Madagascar . For the first time ever, grey seals have been captured on video clapping their flippers very loudly in a show of strength and warning to other …

The presence of a Malagasy lineage on continental Africa during the early Miocene might appear as a surprise, but other endemic Malagasy animals – such as the Aye-Aye – have had similar patterns. Their fossils have been found on the continent, suggesting an African origin.

The idea is that animals might have used rafts of trees to cross from the continent to the island. Rafting has been suggested for many other lizards, so it is not unusual.

Why couldn’t it have got from Madagascar to Africa in the past? The answer lies with looking at how ocean currents flowed in the past.

With regards to chameleons and Africa, oceanic currents favoured eastward dispersal – away from Africa towards Madagascar – at that time of the Eocene until the end of the early Miocene, between 50 to 15 million years ago. So the dispersal would’ve only been possible towards Madagascar.

A study shows that shortly after the early Miocene, the currents between Africa and Madagascar turned in the opposite direction: westwards, toward Africa. This is what’s happening in present-day surface-water circulation. From the middle Miocene onwards, currents would have hindered a journey to Madagascar for any non-swimming animals.

Madagascar’s isolation from the continent supported the further evolution of its terrestrial animals and its exceptional biodiversity. These chameleons then continued to spread and evolve on the island, accounting for the many different endemic species.

To see the chameleon skull, a big piece of the puzzle for this lizard’s history, you can visit the palaeontology section at the Nairobi National Museum, where it is housed.

Andrej ČerňanskýComenius University, Bratislava

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Bavuma blow as South Africa lose opener for first Australia T20 clash .
South Africa must cope without injured opener Temba Bavuma for the first Twenty20 clash of their three-match series against Australia.The 29-year-old batsman suffered the injury when fielding in the high-scoring T20 defeat to England on Sunday and will sit out the upcoming Wanderers clash.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!