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Tech & Science Japan approves bill to help firms to develop 5G, drone technologies

06:01  18 february  2020
06:01  18 february  2020 Source:   reuters.com

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Having lagged behind its rivals in developing 5 G ’s predecessors, China will exert greater effort to set the parameters for the development of the new network. The United States will consider various precautions to prevent China from gaining too much ground in the race to develop 5 G .

"We are encouraging allied and U.S. tech companies to develop alternative 5 G solutions and we are working alongside them to test these technologies at " Developing our own secure 5 G networks will outweigh any perceived gains from partnering with heavily subsidized Chinese providers that answer

a close up of a sign: FILE PHOTO:  A 5G sign is pictured at NTT Docomo booth at Tokyo Game Show 2019 in Chiba© Reuters/Issei Kato FILE PHOTO: A 5G sign is pictured at NTT Docomo booth at Tokyo Game Show 2019 in Chiba

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan's cabinet on Tuesday approved a bill to support companies to develop secure 5G mobile networks and drone technologies amid growing alarm among Tokyo policymakers over the increasing influence of China's 5G technology.

The bill will give companies which develop such technologies access to low-interest rate loans from government-affiliated financial institutions if their plans fulfill standards on cyber security.

Companies that adopt 5G technologies can also get tax incentives if they meet standards set by the government, according to the bill.

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5 G is the fifth generation wireless technology for digital cellular networks that began wide deployment in 2019. As with previous standards, the covered areas are divided into regions called "cells"

Chinese tech giant Huawei is willing to exclusively license its 5 G technology to one American firm to create a level playing field for competitors, CEO Ren Zhengfei said on It's a license that would help the American firm achieve economies of scale to support its business, Ren told CNBC's Christine Tan.

The government will submit the bill to the parliament and aims to bring it to effect around summer.

The United States has been waging a campaign against Huawei Technologies Co, which Washington has warned could spy on customers for Beijing.

Huawei has repeatedly denied those claims.

The United States and some allies including Australia have shut Huawei out of 5G rollout plans, while others including Britain have allowed it a limited role.

Last December, Japan unveiled tax measures aimed at encouraging companies to spend their cash piles on start-ups and other investments and stimulating a slowing economy, while also helping firms to compete with China's advance in 5G technology.

(Reporting by Kaori Kaneko; Editing by Lincoln Feast.)

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