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Tech & Science Samsung offers phone delivery service for test use to ride out coronavirus impact

06:01  18 february  2020
06:01  18 february  2020 Source:   reuters.com

The starting price of Samsung's new Galaxy S20 Ultra is $300 more than Apple's most expensive iPhone

  The starting price of Samsung's new Galaxy S20 Ultra is $300 more than Apple's most expensive iPhone Samsung's Galaxy S20 Ultra starts at $US1,400, making it more expensive than the entry-level iPhone 11 Pro Max, which begins at $US1,100. The Galaxy S20 Ultra, which Samsung announced on Tuesday, comes with a larger screen, an additional depth camera, a camera sensor with a higher-resolution sensor, and 5G support, unlike the iPhone 11 Pro. It's a sign that Samsung is maintaining a premium approach with its flagship smartphones, while Apple has positioned its less expensive iPhone 11 as its primary new phone model. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

SEOUL (Reuters) - Samsung Electronics (KS:005930) has launched smartphone delivery services for customers to test its new products, as the spread of the coronavirus has Samsung customers who want to try out the Galaxy S20 can have one delivered to their door and can use it for up to 24 hours.

While investors should not ignore the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak, it's important to stay with the original big picture as this epidemic will likely not lead This is bad news for investors, but empirical evidence points out that the long-term impact for global economic growth will be negligible.

a screen shot of a smart phone: FILE PHOTO: TM Roh of Samsung Electronics unveils the Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra smartphones during Samsung Galaxy Unpacked 2020 in San Francisco © Reuters/Stephen Lam FILE PHOTO: TM Roh of Samsung Electronics unveils the Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra smartphones during Samsung Galaxy Unpacked 2020 in San Francisco

By Heekyong Yang and Hyunjoo Jin

SEOUL (Reuters) - Samsung Electronics <005930.KS> has launched smartphone delivery services for customers to test its new products, as the spread of the coronavirus has prompted the tech giant to cancel promotional events and brace for weak store sales.

The move highlights efforts made by the global smartphone industry, one of the tech sectors most hurt by the virus outbreak in China, to minimize the impact on business.

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  China's drinkers get happy hour margaritas delivered to their door as coronavirus lockdown continues A number of bars in major Chinese cities like Beijing and Guangzhou have begun delivering happy hour alcohol to customers who have remained indoors because of the outbreak of the new coronavirus. Happy hour deals, where drinks are discounted, are usually reserved for patrons who are physically present at an establishment.But with people staying at home in China and some cities putting a ban on dining out in groups, to try to contain the spread of the virus, bars are taking drinks to where their customers are.

Meanwhile, the government has asked medical suppliers to carry out a risk assessment on the impact of coronavirus and travel restrictions introduced by the Chinese government. Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, described the economic impact of the virus in the UK as "containable".

Korea's Samsung Group will provide nearly two-point-two billion U.S. dollars of financial support …to its subcontractors affected by the novel coronavirus outbreak. Logistics costs of express deliveries for materials and parts from China will be fully covered by Samsung as well.

Analysts say the virus may slash demand for smartphones by half in the first quarter in China, the world's biggest market for the devices.

Apple Inc warned on Monday it was unlikely to meet a sales target set just three weeks ago, while Xiaomi Corp <1810.HK> had to livestream its smartphone launch event last week because of nationwide restrictions on travel and large gatherings.

Samsung, which unveiled a new foldable smartphone and a trio of its flagship Galaxy S20 models last week, is also curtailing brick-and-mortar marketing.

The South Korean smartphone maker has decided to sharply cut the number of in-store "experimental zones," where consumers can try out the latest phones, and skip promotional events such as "Galaxy fan parties" for the latest device over worries about the spread of the virus, dubbed SARS-Cov-2.

Coronavirus CORVID-19's hit to Queensland economy prompts $27 million aid package

  Coronavirus CORVID-19's hit to Queensland economy prompts $27 million aid package Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk likens the economic impact of coronavirus to a natural disaster and says $27 million will be devoted to stimulating the state's "hurting" tourism and agriculture sectors.Those three sectors alone are expected to lose hundreds of millions of dollars due to the closure of China's borders following the outbreak of the virus, which has recently been renamed CORVID-19.

Coronaviruses contain a single strand of RNA within the envelope and, as a virus, can't reproduce without getting inside living cells and hijacking their machinery. The spikes on the viral envelope help coronaviruses bind to cells, which gives them a way in, like blasting the door open with C4.

But as coronavirus fear grips the globe, the Chinese capital and its more than 20 million residents have practically come to a standstill. Theaters have gone dark, stores are shuttered, and schools are closed indefinitely. The government has called off festivities for China’s most-celebrated holiday, the Lunar

There will only be nine such zones for the Galaxy S20, compared with the 130 it had for Galaxy Note 10 series in South Korea, according to Samsung's website.

Samsung customers who want to try out the Galaxy S20 can have one delivered to their door and can use it for up to 24 hours. A delivery worker will pick it up after that, two people familiar with the matter told Reuters, speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak to the media.

"We are introducing a new service, as coronavirus-related issues could result in less in-store experience," one of the people said, adding that the service is expected to be available only in some parts of South Korea.

(Reporting by Heekyong Yang; Editing by Miyoung Kim and Gerry Doyle)

Budget surplus in doubt amid coronavirus crisis .
Prime Minister Scott Morrison says the budget surplus is in doubt this year after Treasurer Josh Frydenberg revealed the financial impact of the coronavirus would be worse than the bushfires. Prime Minister Scott Morrison says the budget surplus is in doubt this year after Treasurer Josh Frydenberg revealed the financial impact of the coronavirus woul The government argued no one could have predicted the virus would emerge when figures were being calculated last year, standing firm that no extreme fiscal measures would be taken.

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