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Tech & Science Messaging service Slack suffers major outage

05:21  10 january  2018
05:21  10 january  2018 Source:   foxnews.com

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The Slack messaging tool suffered a major outage Tuesday that left users unable to connect to the service . In a post on its systems status page, Slack noted that that customers were experiencing Users took to Twitter to discuss what some jokingly referred to as “the great Slack outage of 2018.”

Popular workplace messaging service Slack suffered a massive outage late Tuesday evening, leaving users around the world unable to send or receive messages and files. The service failed around 7 p.m. ET and partially resumed by 9:13 p.m. ET.

  Messaging service Slack suffers major outage © Provided by Fox News The Slack messaging tool suffered a major outage Tuesday that left users unable to connect to the service.

In a post on its systems status page, Slack noted that that customers were experiencing connectivity issues as a result of the outage.

“A majority of customers are unable to connect to Slack. We're aware of the issue and are working to resolve it as quickly as possible,” explained Slack in the post, which was written at 2:35 P.M. EST.

“We've isolated the problem and are working on bringing the service back online for all users. More details to come as they become available,” it added at 3:00 P.M.EST.

Most customers should now be reconnected, it noted at 3:20 P.M. EST

Users took to Twitter to discuss what some jokingly referred to as “the great Slack outage of 2018.”

The messaging tool has more than 50,000 paying customers. Last year, Slack announced that more than 6 million active daily users are using the service.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Booby-trapped messaging apps used for spying: researchers .
An espionage campaign using malware-infected messaging apps has been stealing smartphone data from activists, soldiers, lawyers, journalists and others in more than 20 countries, researchers said in a report Thursday. A report authored by digital rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation and mobile security firm Lookout detailed discovery of "a prolific actor" with nation-state capabilities "exploiting targets globally across multiple platforms."Desktop computers were also targeted, but getting into data-rich mobile devices was a primary objective, according to the report.

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