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Tech & Science Intel pledges transparency after Spectre, Meltdown vulnerability

07:15  12 january  2018
07:15  12 january  2018 Source:   engadget.com

Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info

  Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info Hardware and software manufacturers including Apple and Microsoft began pushing out patches that protected against attacks making use of the flaw. The flaw, which Intel dubbed a side-channel analysis attack,  was discovered "months ago" Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said on CNBC Wednesday. The discovery was made by researchers at Google's Project Zero security group, which reported it to the affected companies. The vulnerabilities undermine some of the most fundamental security constraints employed by modern computers, said Craig Young, a researcher at computer security company Tripwire.

The Intel CEO also notes that the impact of Meltdown and Spectre patches on performance can vary widely, but that Intel will provide progress reports on the patches its working on. "To accelerate the security of the entire industry, we commit to publicly identify significant security vulnerabilities

Intel is also committing to greater transparency on the performance impact of the Meltdown / Spectre patches. Intel should more actively push its partners to release patches and release more comprehensive vulnerability detection tools which also tell customers where to get updates.

a man standing on a stage© Provided by Engadget The last week or so has seen a lot of activity around Meltdown and Spectre, two CPU flaws in modern chips from the likes of AMD and Intel. Apple, Microsoft and Google have provided interim fixes for their respective hardware, but it will take much more than simple patches (that can cause more harm than good) to truly eradicate the issue. Just a few hours after Intel revealed that there may be more slowdowns from its Meltdown processor fix, the company's CEO Brian Krzanich has written an open letter to further detail the steps Intel is taking to deal with the issues.

Krzanich promises that by January 15th, 90 percent of Intel CPUs made in the last five years will be updated, with the remaining 10 percent patched by the end of the month. The company will then start working on updates for older chips "as prioritized by (its) customers."

Apple Says All Macs, IPhones, IPads Exposed to Chip Flaw

  Apple Says All Macs, IPhones, IPads Exposed to Chip Flaw Apple Inc. said all Mac computers and iOS devices, like iPhones and iPads, are affected by chip security flaws unearthed this week, but the company stressed there are no known exploits impacting users. The Cupertino, California-based company said recent software updates for iPads, iPhones, iPod touches, Mac desktops and laptops, and the Apple TV set-top-box mitigate one of the vulnerabilities known as Meltdown. The Apple Watch, which runs a derivative of the iPhone’s operating system is not affected, according to the company.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich today wrote an open letter to Intel customers following the " Meltdown " and " Spectre " hardware-based vulnerabilities that impact its processors. In the letter, Krzanich says that by January 15, updates will have been issued for at least 90 percent of Intel CPUs introduced in the

Spectre haunting all modern chips The Intel meltdown Meltdown and Spectre are the real deal, and rightly have security professionals concerned. However, at this time there are plenty of things you can do to protect yourself that don't involve buying a new computer .

The Intel CEO also notes that the impact of Meltdown and Spectre patches on performance can vary widely, but that Intel will provide progress reports on the patches its working on. "To accelerate the security of the entire industry, we commit to publicly identify significant security vulnerabilities following rules of responsible disclosure and, further, we commit to working with the industry to share hardware innovations that will accelerate industry-level progress in dealing with side-channel attacks," wrote Krzanich in his statement. He also committed to help fund academic and independent research into possible security issues in the future.

Intel

Intel's new cameras add human-like 3D vision to any machine .
Intel has released two ready-to-use RealSense depth cameras, the D415 and the D435, that can add 3D capabilities to any device or machine. They both come in a USB-powered form factor and are capable of processing depth in real time, thanks to the chipmaker's new RealSense vision processor D4. The models work indoors and outdoors in any lighting environment, so they can be used for almost any machine that needs a depth camera. Those include drones meant to soar the skies and robots with AR/VR features.

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