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Tech & Science Zap your brain for a better you

10:01  14 january  2018
10:01  14 january  2018 Source:   engadget.com

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Yet, increasingly, startups are allowing you to administer your own electric zaps , to achieve a host of goals. By stimulating it, Modius essentially tricks your brain into thinking the body is in motion, which jacks up your metabolism.

If you ’re interested in helping medical professionals better understand “ brain zaps ,” feel free to participate in the following survey: Click here to take the “ Brain Zaps ” Questionnaire.

a man holding a gun© Provided by Engadget Squirt some conductive gel on your skin, place a lightweight headset on your noggin and, according to a number of companies at CES, there's barely a limit to the types of self-improvement you can achieve. You can improve your sleep or your athletic performance, or lose weight. You might relieve nausea or even aid depression. And with almost no effort on your part.

Many of these gadgets use tDCS -- transcranial direct current stimulation -- to mildly stimulate or suppress neurons firing in certain areas of the brain. It's a straightforward mechanism that has been heavily studied in connection with everything from math skills to post-stroke rehabilitation. There is much we still don't know about how the brain functions, and tDCS research is not conclusive -- it merely correlates electric shocks with improvements in conditions without our understanding why. Yet when it works, it's a noninvasive, relatively cheap clinical treatment that's fairly safe, beyond potential burns and mild discomfort.

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Off-the-shelf devices that tap into this research, mostly to help users focus or relax, have been around for a while. Yet, increasingly, startups are allowing you to administer your own electric zaps, to achieve a host of goals.

Modius, for instance, is designed for weight loss. It doesn't use tDCS, because its currents don't hit the brain directly. Instead it targets your vestibular nerve, which affects the hypothalamus.

As CEO Jason McKeown explained, the hypothalamus controls fat storage, appetite and metabolic rate. By stimulating it, Modius essentially tricks your brain into thinking the body is in motion, which jacks up your metabolism. "It feels like you're moving," he said. "It's a pleasant floaty feeling."

To me, it was more of a lightheadedness, like a dizzying rush of blood to the head. McKeown claimed that, of the 650 people using Modius, 80 percent lost weight, with an average decrease of six pounds after six weeks. After an Indiegogo campaign last summer, the device went on sale this month for $499.

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Just a quick jolt to the brain and then you 're a math wizard? It sounds too good to be true, but new research suggests electric shocks may actually help! Now you can simply zap your brain with a pulse of electricity to make mental arithmetic a whole lot easier."

. Brain - zapping devices are now readily available online for an ‘instant boost’ to your attention, mood or memory. But experts warn home-users could be doing more harm than good .

Meanwhile, Danish company Platoscience's headset, called Platowork, is designed to help you be creative or focused, depending on the setting. (Another product still in development is called Platoplay; the company says it will boost eSports players' performance.) The company says that 15 minutes with the headset shortly before you want to work gives you a brain boost for about an hour.

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Brain zaps refer to electrical shocks or jolting sensations that commonly occur after an individual has discontinued their antidepressant medications. Fortunately though, even with brain zaps being able to worsen over time, they pose no threat to an individual’s well being.

Research indeed shows a link between tDCS and creativity, and the company pitches its product as a way to stop procrastination or break through a mental block. "We don't help you be better at creativity or focus; we help you get into that mind-set," said Morten Lindhardt Madsen, the company's UX designer.

a woman wearing a hat© ybrain Then there's Ybrain, a startup from Seoul, South Korea, that claims to treat depression. In South Korea, depression rates are comparatively high for a developed country, but the condition still carries a public stigma. The company says it wants to provide private relief to users. "We found that many patients who have depression are not coming to hospital," said a spokesman. A number of papers have shown that tDCS can decrease depression, and a recent review claims that depression is one of the most responsive conditions to mild electric pulses, along with addiction and fibromyalgia.

In an unpublished study by Ybrain, 56 percent of patients with major depressive disorder responded to their device. In these patients, the treatment by headset was comparable to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are a common form of antidepressant. The study consisted of 12 tDCS treatments in six weeks, involving 96 patients in Korea -- a relatively large sample size compared with similar studies.

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Zap your brain for a better you . Quick fixes for self improvement were on show at CES. Would you let someone zap your brain ? Why 'electronic brain stimulation' is trending.

Zapping different parts of the brain has been linked with superior learning of new motor skills; better math skills; better social skills; superior learning and memory; and on the list goes. tDCS is also being investigated as a treatment for a range of psychiatric and neurological problems

The clinical model is called MINDD and is approved by Korea's Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (the FDA equivalent) for treating depression and post-stroke rehabilitation. It is being used in more than 30 hospitals, according to the spokesman. The company also showcased a consumer model, which they hope to launch in 2019.

Together with more established neurostimulation companies at CES, like NuCalm (which is about to sell its consumer model, ReNu, with a catalog of potential emotional outcomes) and Halo (which primes your brain for workouts), this sector of devices is filling up.

Yet, although there's more than a decade of tDCS research, some experts in the area are reluctant to prescribe it for conditions like clinical depression. The issue is that when consumers see treatments on the shelves, they have every right to assume they're safe and effective.

In the unsupervised hands of consumers, there's a risk that a one-size-fits-all dosage may not fit the patient. For instance, tDCS treatment on depression patients in a Taiwan psychiatric facility resulted in outbursts of rage in two instances last year -- episodes that could have been missed if they had taken place at home. While Ybrain's consumer model will not allow users to change the dosage, the company acknowledges that patients with epilepsy or undiagnosed bipolar disorder could be harmed by the treatment -- and they cannot say why 44 percent of patients showed no improvement in their study. Modius, meanwhile, can be used only once a day for 60 minutes, after which users will be locked out. Both companies say they will educate customers on holistic treatment for depression and weight loss, respectively. But ultimately, they can't make people listen.

We are forever chasing self-improvement, and neurostimulation promises immediate results. Yet without solid science, a doctor's guidance or specific regulations, these consumer products simply might not work. Then again, if the technologies emerging at CES take off, they'll raise a host of new questions too: Will users rely on them to the detriment of their long-term health? Could they become addicted to mini electric shocks to the head? If mishandled, this technology could turn out to be ineffective at best, and dangerous at worst. And of course, the allure of a quick fix might be too strong for its own good.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from CES 2018.

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