•   
  •   

Tech & Science These Glowing, Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Could Fight Malaria Instead Of Spreading It

03:40  13 march  2018
03:40  13 march  2018 Source:   gizmodo.com.au

LeBron James calls Aussie Ben Simmons the heir to his throne in glowing post

  LeBron James calls Aussie Ben Simmons the heir to his throne in glowing post NBA superstar LeBron James has further reinforced the notion that Ben Simmons is his heir apparent by gushing about the Australian rookie on his social media accounts after the pair faced off. James's Cleveland Cavaliers went down 108-97 to the Philadelphia 76ers, where Simmons is one of the headline acts of an exciting young cast currently thrilling basketball audiences.

Mosquitoes that have been genetically modified using CRISPR. They glow because of green Genetic engineering , researchers hope, will fight disease both by altering the genes of people and It is the primary vector for yellow fever, dengue fever, Zika virus, and malaria , among other deadly

Genetic engineering , researchers hope, will fight Mosquitoes that have been genetically modified using CRISPR. They glow because of green florescent protein used to track modifications. Malaria is one of the world's deadliest diseases. Their finding could be a major boon in the fight against a

a green traffic light© Provided by Allure Media Pty Ltd Genetic engineering, researchers hope, will fight disease both by altering the genes of people and by changing the genes of critters known to pass diseases on to us.

Take the mosquito, a pest that kills more than half a million people globally each year. It is the primary vector for yellow fever, dengue fever, Zika virus and malaria, among other deadly diseases. Most of those illnesses do not have vaccines or cures. For years, scientists have been tweaking the mosquito's genome, hoping to interfere with its ability to spread disease to people.

The most high-profile attempts at doing so have involved essentially sterilising the insects. The British company Oxitec, for example, has been engineering Zika-carrying male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to carry a lethal gene that kills off any offspring they might have with a wild female, killing off invasive mosquito populations in order to prevent disease.

CRISPR will save lives - and technology can't come soon enough

  CRISPR will save lives - and technology can't come soon enough The potential applications of CRISPR are enormous. IHere’s the paradox: modern gene technology is far less genetically invasive – and much better understood – than the time-worn practice of selective breeding, and yet so many of us live in fear of genetically modified organisms. Instead of adding, removing, or reshuffling thousands of unknown genes in order to breed traits in or out of organisms, we’re now able to act on just one well-characterised gene with precision.

For years, scientists have been tweaking the mosquito ’s genome, hoping to interfere with its ability to spread disease to people. The most high-profile attempts at doing so have involved essentially sterilising the insects. The British company Oxitec, for example, has been engineering

Genetic engineering , researchers hope, will fight disease both by altering the genes of people and by changing the genes of critters known to pass diseases on to us. No, silly - these are glowing mosquitoes to fight malaria instead of spreading it .

Now a new paper presents a way to use genetic engineering to tackle perhaps the biggest mosquito-born threat of all: malaria.

Using the buzzy gene-editing technique CRISPR/Cas9, scientists at John Hopkins University knocked out a gene called FREP1 that has been shown to make Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes less susceptible to the parasite that ultimately causes malaria in humans. Several mosquito proteins are involved in the cycle that allows the Plasmodium parasite to make its way to the mosquito's salivary gland, where it can the spread to bitten humans.

In a study published this week in the journal PLOS Pathogens, researchers showed that using CRISPR to delete the single gene FREP1 successfully interfered with that process.

Daniel Is Still 'Karate Kid' at Heart in New 'Cobra Kai' Teaser

  Daniel Is Still 'Karate Kid' at Heart in New 'Cobra Kai' Teaser "When the fight comes to you, you have to be ready to fight back," says Daniel LaRusso (Ralph Macchio) in a new teaser for "Cobra Kai," YouTube Red's upcoming sequel series to "The Karate Kid" movies. The first teaser reunited Daniel and his old rival Johnny Lawrence (William Zabka). The second teaser focused on down-and-out Johnny and his effort to revive his old dojo and teach his style of karate to a new generation.

To Fight Malaria , Scientists Try Genetic Engineering To Wipe Out Mosquitoes . " These gene drives, they're able to copy themselves. So instead of half of the offspring inheriting the gene "So what happens is that it spreads and it spreads and it spreads . And this is the fantastic thing," says " This potentially could be a way of creating some quite nasty bioweapons," says Jim Thomas of the

This is how Oxitec's pioneering mosquito intervention works: scientists breed both Oxitec's sterile Romeos are genetically modified mosquitoes ; their code has been changed to make " Genetically modified mosquitoes are much more applicable for diseases like dengue because malaria is carried

Malaria is one of the world's deadliest diseases. Their finding could be a major boon in the fight against a disease that infects hundreds of millions of people and kills hundreds of thousands every year.

Horn confident of title win over Crawford

  Horn confident of title win over Crawford Australian boxer Jeff Horn believes he will retain his world title when he fights Terence Crawford next month in the US, but concedes it will be tough.However, Horn admitted the April 14 showdown at the Mandalay Bay Events Centre against the unbeaten American - a world champion in two weight classes and regarded as one of the world's best pound-for-pound fighters - won't be easy.

These genetically engineered mosquitoes would be one of several vector control methods (such as mosquito netting and repellant sprays) aiming to reduce the number of disease-carrying mosquitoes in affected areas. The Oxitec mosquitoes have already proven effective in recent field tests in Brazil

Watch out, malaria — scientists are coming for you with genetically engineered mosquitoes . A team of researchers has altered the DNA in mosquitoes so they can fight Mosquitoes get the parasites by feeding on blood from infected humans, then spread it to other humans during subsequent meals.

But first, there are more than a few hurdles. To begin, deactivating the FREP1 in lab-bred mosquitoes also made the mosquitoes less fit, meaning that if those mosquitoes were released into the wild to mate and spread their malaria-resistant DNA, they might not be able to compete for mates against other wild mosquitoes.

Fitness has been a major concern of other projects aimed at altering mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are more fragile than other insects, despite their menacing tendencies. Other insects, for example, are easily blasted with radiation to effectively sterilise them, but when such experiments were done in mosquitoes, they have been too weak to mate -- which is a problem, because the idea is to get these mutant mosquitoes to mate in the wild, thus taking mating opportunities away from fitter competitors.

Even if a mosquito appears fine in the lab, there's no telling how things will play out in the real world. To address this, the study authors are exploring potentially only deactivating that gene in the gut of adult female mosquitoes, hoping the fitness cost will be lower but the resistance still effective.

Sony made a projector helmet to help you understand mosquitoes

  Sony made a projector helmet to help you understand mosquitoes Someone at Sony just strapped a bunch of devices together and attached a HTC Vive tracker to the back so that wearers can move around the room while the projection follows their movements.  © The Verge Sony says the device is supposed to demonstrate how technology can affect human perception through our various senses. Sony says the device is supposed to demonstrate how technology can affect human perception through our various senses. This demo attempts to teach wearers about how animals use their senses to get around the world — like how mosquitos use smell to find blood.

In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito -borne diseases some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic They have engineered the mosquitoes to over-produce a certain protein which in turn causes the mosquitoes to die.

The genetically engineered mosquitoes mated with mosquitoes lacking this gene. So their young had a single copy of the gene -- not two. It says evidence shows that chemicals in the air can affect the health of male reproductive fluid. This increases the chances of men producing a physically

And while Anopheles gambiae is the primary mosquito vector for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, there are somewhere around 40 Anopheles subspecies that can transmit malaria to people. There is no telling whether this method will work in other species.

Safety and public opinion will also come into play. It was public opinion, not regulators, that put the kibosh on Oxitec's trial of its mosquitoes in Key West. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has invested heavily into using a genetic engineering technology called gene drives to tackle malaria, but has described the project as a "long shot," no doubt due to public objections in addition to the technological hurdles.

Those concerns include unintended consequences that could alter an insect's behaviour or trigger a troublesome chain reaction in which a whole ecosystem is adversely affected by these altered mosquitos.

Other approaches to fighting malaria have tried genetically modifying bacteria found inside mosquitoes to fight off the parasite, or giving it new genes that help it to not transmit malaria.

But scientists are already preparing for the potential release of modified mosquitoes in malaria-plagued places like Burkina Faso. That day may not exactly be around the corner, but one day genetically altered mosquitoes very well might save thousands of lives.

Top Gear sets new Guinness World Record .
'Top Gear' have set a new Guinness World Record title for the fastest tractor and presenter Matt LeBlanc is set to try and beat the record set by The Stig.The hit BBC Two show - which is hosted by Matt LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid - has created a high-speed tractor, known as the 'Track-tor', which can reach up to speeds on 87.2mph, setting a new record.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!