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Tech & Science Facebook points finger at Google and Twitter for data collection

11:55  17 april  2018
11:55  17 april  2018 Source:   techcrunch.com

Zuckerberg launches Facebook research effort to protect elections

  Zuckerberg launches Facebook research effort to protect elections The social network says the initiative will help researchers figure out the effect social media has on democracy.The massive social network on Monday launched a new initiative designed to help scholars research the impact of social media on elections. The move comes a day before Facebook's founder and CEO is set to testify to Congress on data misappropriated and used by Cambridge Analytica during the 2016 US presidential election campaign.

Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. It seems Facebook is tired of being singled-out. The tacked on “them too!” statements at the end of its descriptions of opaque data collection practices might have been trying to normalize the behavior

Just like @HillaryClinton points the finger @realDonaldTrump for Russia Collusion. Google , Twitter , Facebook , Amazon and a few others all far left. Owners and CEO's control information presented to public.

  Facebook points finger at Google and Twitter for data collection © AP Photo/Noah Berger, File "Other companies s**k in your data too," Facebook explained in many, many words today with a blog post detailing how it gathers information about you from around the web.

Facebook product management director David Baser wrote "Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn all have similar Like and Share buttons to help people share things on their services. Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. These companies — and many others — also offer advertising services. In fact, most websites and apps send the same information to multiple companies each time you visit them". Describing how Facebook receives cookies, IP address, and browser info about users from other sites, he noted "when you see a YouTube video on a site that’s not YouTube, it tells your browser to request the video from YouTube. YouTube then sends it to you."

Google's phone app will boot spam calls to voicemail automatically

  Google's phone app will boot spam calls to voicemail automatically Google is taking spam calls seriously. An upcoming update to the default Phone app on Android One, Nexus and Pixel devices will send potential spam calls directly to voicemail, as spotted by 9to5 Google. The feature works like this: A potential spam call comes in, and automatically goes to voicemail. You won't receive a notification for the missed call, and your phone won't ring. However, calls will still show up in your call history and voicemail. Presumably, Google is using AI to filter these calls, much in the way it does spam messages in Gmail.

Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. It seems Facebook is tired of being singled-out. The tacked on ‘them too!” statements at the end of its descriptions of opaque data collection practices might have been trying to normalize the behavior

Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. It seems Facebook is tired of being singled-out. The tacked on ‘them too!” statements at the end of its descriptions of opaque data collection practices might have been trying to normalize the behavior

It seems Facebook is tired of being singled-out. The tacked on 'them too!" statements at the end of its descriptions of opaque data collection practices might have been trying to normalize the behavior, but comes off feeling a bit petty.

  Facebook points finger at Google and Twitter for data collection © Provided by TechCrunch

The blog post also fails to answer one of the biggest lines of questioning from CEO Mark Zuckerberg's testimonies before congress last week. Zuckerberg was asked by Representative Ben Lujan about whether Facebook constructs "shadow profiles" of ad targeting data about non-users.

Today's blog post merely notes that "When you visit a site or app that uses our services, we receive information even if you’re logged out or don’t have a Facebook account. This is because other apps and sites don’t know who is using Facebook. Many companies offer these types of services and, like Facebook, they also get information from the apps and sites that use them."

Facebook fuels broad privacy debate by tracking non-users

  Facebook fuels broad privacy debate by tracking non-users Concern about Facebook Inc's respect for data privacy is widening to include the information it collects about non-users, after Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said the world's largest social network tracks people whether they have accounts or not.Privacy concerns have swamped Facebook since it acknowledged last month that information about millions of users wrongly ended up in the hands of political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, a firm that has counted U.S. President Donald Trump's 2016 electoral campaign among its clients.

Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. It seems Facebook is tired of being singled-out. The tacked on “them too!” statements at the end of its descriptions of opaque data collection practices might have been trying to normalize the behavior

And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. It seems Facebook is tired of being singled-out. The tacked on ‘them too!” statements at the end of its descriptions of opaque data collection practices might have been trying to normalize the behavior, but comes off feeling a bit petty.

Facebook has a lot more questions to answer about this practice, since most of its privacy and data controls are only accessible to users who've signed up.

The data privacy double-standard

Facebook points finger at Google and Twitter for data collection

  Facebook points finger at Google and Twitter for data collection 'Other companies suck in your data too' Facebook explained in many, many words today with a blog post detailing how it gathers information about you from around the web. Facebook product management director David Baser wrote "Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn all have similar Like and Share buttons to help people share things on their services. Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features. These companies — and many others — also offer advertising services. In fact, most websites and apps send the same information to multiple companies each time you visit them".

Facebook competes in the free market. If they scale back on data collection , that will hurt their offering to advertisers and cost them money that will go to Google and others. It makes sense to give other examples like Google ads and Twitter buttons in this context.

Featured Articles. Twitter for Beginners. Brought to you by Google News. Read the rest of the article here.

That said, other tech companies have gotten off light. Whether it's because Apple and Google aren't CEO'd by their founders any more, or we've grown to see iOS and Android as such underlying platforms that they aren't responsible for what third-party developers do, scrutiny has focused on Zuckerberg and Facebook.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal emerged from Facebook being unable to enforce its policies that prohibit developers from sharing or selling data they pull from Facebook users. Yet it's unclear whether Apple and Google do a better job at this policing. And while Facebook let users give their friends' names and interests to Dr. Aleksandr Kogan who sold it to Cambridge Analytica, iOS and Android apps routinely ask you to give them your friends' phone numbers, and we don't see mass backlash about that.

At least not yet.

Facebook removes accounts advertising stolen identities .
Facebook Inc  has removed a number of accounts and pages that advertised and sold social security numbers, addresses, phone numbers, and alleged credit card numbers of dozens of people, following a report by news website Motherboard. "Posts containing information like social security numbers or credit card information are not allowed on Facebook, and we remove this material when we become aware of it," a Facebook spokesman said on Tuesday.A Google search still pulls up a few public Facebook posts that offer to sell personal details including credit card numbers.

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