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Tech & Science Astronomers spot one of the oldest stars ever

03:07  06 november  2018
03:07  06 november  2018 Source:   bgr.com

One of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies started leaking into another

One of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies started leaking into another As chaotic as life is here on Earth, it's not often that we have time to look up at the night sky and ponder the infinite frontier, much less keep track of what's going on out there. 

Astronomers now believe it to be an incredible 13.5 billion years old . Its small size and dim shine made it hard to spot , and the team suggests that there might be plenty of other ultra- old stars sitting around the Milky Way that have remained undetected because we simply can’t see them all that well.

Astronomers now believe it to be an incredible 13.5 billion years old . Its small size and dim shine made it hard to spot , and the team suggests that there might be plenty of other ultra- old stars sitting around the Milky Way that have remained undetected because we simply can’t see them all that well.

Astronomers spot one of the oldest stars ever© Provided by BGR Our Solar System is incredibly old by human standards. The Sun, sitting in the center, is thought to be just over 4.6 billion years old, which is an almost unfathomable amount of time to you and I. But it’s actually not all that impressive when it comes to stars.

A new survey of one particular star here in our own Milky Way galaxy reveals that it’s a whole lot older than anyone thought. In fact, it’s old enough to make our own star look like a youngster by comparison. The elderly star is called (deep breath) 2MASS J18082002–5104378 B, and what it lacks in a flashy name it more than makes up for in age. Astronomers now believe it to be an incredible 13.5 billion years old.

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Our Solar System is incredibly old by human standards. The Sun, sitting in the center, is thought to be just over 4.6 billion years old , which is an almost unfathomable amount of time to you and I . But it's actually not all that impressive when it comes to stars . A new survey of one particular star .

The first stars to form in the universe likely flicked on around 200 million years after the Big Bang. These early stars were forged out of the material that was As these stars lived out their lives, they converted their starter elements into progressively heavier elements, which astronomers call “metals.”

2MASS J18… you know what? Let’s just call it “the Old Star,” for now. The Old Star gave away its age thanks to its incredibly low mass and metal content. Researchers believe that newer stars tend to be very high in metallicity, but the Old Star’s metal content is incredibly low. It’s also very small, weighing in at only around 1/10th of the mass of our own Sun.

“We’ve never discovered a star so low mass and made of so few grams of metals,” astrophysicist Andrew Casey, co-author of the study published in The Astrophysical Journal, told ScienceAlert. “This discovery tells us that the very first stars in the Universe didn’t have to all be massive stars that died long ago. These ancient stars could form from very small amounts of material, which means some of those relics from soon after the Big Bang could still exist today.”

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Astronomers Spot Oldest Galaxy Ever Detected By Looking Back In. This 9-Gigapixel Image —With 84 Million Stars — Of the Milky Way Will Give You And recently, astronomers just spotted one of the brightest yet. Understanding the physics behind these events will let astronomers delve deeper

The most distant star explosions in the universe have now been discovered, suggesting scientists may one day see the deaths of the first stars to arise after the Big Bang, researchers say. In the past 12 years, astronomers have detected a new class of supernova, so-called super-luminous supernovas

So, how has the star managed to stay alive for so long? Well, its small size actually plays in its favor, as very large stars tend to burn through their fuel much faster than the particularly tiny ones. The Old Star only just breaks the known mass limit to facilitate the burning of hydrogen, so it’s very slowly using up its fuel over billions of years.

Its small size and dim shine made it hard to spot, and the team suggests that there might be plenty of other ultra-old stars sitting around the Milky Way that have remained undetected because we simply can’t see them all that well.

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