World: Comment: The Christchurch shooting was streamed live, but think twice about watching it - PressFrom - Australia
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WorldComment: The Christchurch shooting was streamed live, but think twice about watching it

22:20  15 march  2019
22:20  15 march  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

Aust leaders horrified over NZ shooting

Aust leaders horrified over NZ shooting Australian authorities are seeking details on any citizens affected by the Christchurch shooting, which Scott Morrison says "horrified" him.

What to watch next. Christchurch shootings leave 49 people dead. ABC News 2:53. PM pledges increased infrastructure aid in Solomon Islands. According to reports, the footage apparently showed a man moving through the interior of a mosque and shooting at his victims indiscriminately.

People are sharing the gruesome video posted by the Christchurch mosque gunman. What is the responsibility of news agencies in such a situation?

Comment: The Christchurch shooting was streamed live, but think twice about watching it© AP/Mark Baker Mosque shooting man kneeling. Like so many times before with acts of mass violence in different parts of the world, news of shootings at two Christchurch mosques on Friday instantly ricocheted around the world via social media.

When these incidents occur, online activity follows a predictable pattern as journalists and others try to learn the name of the perpetrator and any reason behind the killings.

This time they did not have to wait long. In an appalling example of the latest technology, the gunman reportedly livestreamed his killings on Facebook.

Sonny Bill Williams sends tearful tribute to Christchurch shooting victims

Sonny Bill Williams sends tearful tribute to Christchurch shooting victims "I'm just deeply, deeply saddened this would happen in New Zealand." My heart is hurting about the news coming out of Christchurch. Sending love & prayers to the effected families❤️ pic.twitter.com/7PX9wc56b8— Sonny Bill Williams (@SonnyBWilliams) March 15, 2019 In the Muslim culture, a dua is regarded as a profound act of worship. Williams was joined by a chorus of sports players and organisations to pay their respects. Christchurch, we stand with you during this time. Our thoughts and sympathies are with everyone affected by today's tragedy. Stay strong. Kia Kaha.

Livestreamming the attack, the Christchurch shooter uttered “subscribe to PewDiePie” before gunning down worshippers at a mosque. Perhaps no detail is more reflective of that than the fact that one shooter name-dropped the YouTuber PewDiePie during the livestream; specifically, “subscribe to

The attacks were live - streamed on Facebook and, despite the original being taken down, were All of the social media firms have sent heartfelt sympathy to the victims of the mass shootings , reiterating Dr Ciaran Gillespie, a political scientist from Surrey University, thinks the problem goes far deeper

According to reports, the footage apparently showed a man moving through the interior of a mosque and shooting at his victims indiscriminately.

Amplifying the spread of this kind of material can be harmful.

Mainstream media outlets posted raw footage from gunman

The video was later taken down but not before many had called out the social media company.

The ABC's online technology reporter, Ariel Bogle, blamed the platforms for allowing the video to be shared.

ABC investigative reporter Sophie McNeil asked people on Twitter not to share the video, since the perpetrator clearly wanted it to be widely disseminated.

New Zealand police similarly urged people not to share the link and said they were working to have the footage removed.

Newcastle and Sharks players honour Christchurch shooting victims with minute's silence

Newcastle and Sharks players honour Christchurch shooting victims with minute's silence Brilliant stuff.

The attacks were live - streamed on Facebook and, despite the original being taken down, were All of the social media firms have sent heartfelt sympathy to the victims of the mass shootings , reiterating Dr Ciaran Gillespie, a political scientist from Surrey University, thinks the problem goes far deeper

Christchurch mosque shootings . Image copyright Getty Images. Image caption The Christchurch attacks have sparked a debate in Australia about race hate. When it emerged that the suspect behind the Christchurch mosque shootings was an Australian, it set the stage for some agonised

Following a spate of killings in France in 2016, French mainstream media proprietors decided to adopt a policy of not recycling pictures of atrocities.

The editor of Le Monde, Jerome Fenoglio, said:

Following the attack in Nice, we will no longer publish photographs of the perpetrators of killings, to avoid possible effects of posthumous glorification.

On Friday, information about the name of the Christchurch gunman, his photograph and his Twitter account, were easy to find.

Later, it was possible to see that his Twitter account had been suspended.

On Facebook, it was easy to source pictures, and even a selfie, that the alleged perpetrator had shared on social media before entering the mosque.

But it was not just social media that shared the pictures.

Six minutes of raw video was posted by news.com.au, which, after a warning at the front of the clip, showed video from the gunman's helmet camera as he drove through the streets on his way to the mosque.

Milo Yiannopoulos banned from entering Australia following Christchurch shooting comments

Milo Yiannopoulos banned from entering Australia following Christchurch shooting comments Australia's immigration minister David Coleman condemns Yiannopoulos's remarks about the Christchurch mosque attacks as "appalling" in a blow to the controversial figure's attempt to make a return in 2019.

In the week since 50 lives were abruptly taken, Christchurch has come together with powerful "He got shot . And I think , how many people has he saved? And someone decides to play out with a Image caption The past week has seen a constant stream of tributes from New Zealanders of all

I think that is the song in the beginning followed by the British Grenadiers. 18 year old NZ student Don Burrough has- been arrested and held without bail because he reposted the livestream Christchurch shooting video and having “radical” views.

The risks of sharing information about terrorism

Sharing this material can be highly problematic.

In some past incidences of terrorism and hate crime, pictures of the wrong people have been published around the world on social and in mainstream media.

After the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, the wrong man was fingered as a culprit by a crowd-sourced detective hunt on various social media sites.

There is also the real fear that publishing such material could lead to copycat crimes.

Along with the photographs and 17 minutes of film, the alleged perpetrator has penned a 73-page manifesto, in which he describes himself as "just a regular white man".

Norwegian extremist Anders Behring Breivik, who killed 69 people on the island of Utoya in 2011, took a similar approach to justifying his acts.

Before his killing spree, Breivik wrote a 1,518 page manifesto called 2083: A European Declaration of Independence.

The public's right to know

Those who believe in media freedom and the public's right to know are likely to complain if information and pictures are not available in full view on the internet. Conspiracies fester when people believe they are not being told the truth.

Erdogan shows Christchurch attack footage at rally

Erdogan shows Christchurch attack footage at rally Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has aired extracts of video from the Christchurch terror attacks at an election rally over the weekend. As large crowds gathered to hear Erdogan speak, partially blurred out images of what appeared to be portions of Australian man Brenton Tarrant’s “manifesto” appeared on a nearby big screen. As Erdogan supporters raised their mobile phones to film the alleged terrorist propaganda the vision shifted to that of a man holding a rifle, with the sound of rapid gunfire echoing in the air.

The week prior to the incident, the Police in Christchurch were issued anti terrorist firearms and I watched the video that was realised - incidentally, the Police after it was realised and seemingly The mosque was surprisingly quite - the noise of the shooting was evident but no screaming, crying

Those who think they are notable today in politics should realize that history will reflect them as having been total ignoramuses. From Nixon onward, Western politics has been a bad joke and the rest of the world has fared far worse. Wake up no one is revering you once you are no longer in control of

Instant global access to news can also pose problems to subsequent trials of perpetrators, as was shown in the recent case involving Cardinal George Pell.

While some large media platforms, like Facebook and Twitter, are under increasing pressure to clean up their acts in terms of publishing hate crime material, it is nigh on impossible to stop the material popping up in multiple places elsewhere.

Members of the public, and some media organisations, will not stop speculating, playing detective or "rubber necking" at horror, despite what well-meaning social media citizens may desire.

For the media it's all about clicks, and unfortunately horror drives clicks.

Update at 12:30am Saturday: Facebook says it has taken down a video of the shootings at a New Zealand mosque and removed the identified shooter's accounts from its platforms after being alerted by police.

Facebook New Zealand spokeswoman Mia Garlick said in a statement the company was "also removing any praise or support for the crime and the shooter or shooters as soon as we're aware."

Both YouTube owner Google and Twitter also said they were working to remove video of the shootings from their sites.

SKY New Zealand pulls Sky News Australia from its platform after it aired disturbing footage of the deadly mosque shootings

SKY New Zealand pulls Sky News Australia from its platform after it aired disturbing footage of the deadly mosque shootings Sky News Australia has been dropped by New Zealand's biggest satellite television provider after it aired distressing footage of a livestream video connected to the Friday shooting in Christchurch which left 49 dead. Sky News Australia is available via subscription in Australia and on New Zealand's SKY Network Television. Despite similar names, SKY is not affiliated with Rupert Murdoch's Sky News networks. At least 49 people were shot dead Friday in a terror attack that targeted two mosques in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand.

As Muslims in Christchurch , New Zealand, grieved after attacks on two mosques killed at least 50 people and injured dozens more, several charities sought donations to help the wounded and the victims’ families rebuild their lives .

But the people watching the video stream recognized it as something entirely different: a meme. The details that have emerged about the Christchurch shooting — at least 49 were killed in an attack on two Well, what we know comes from a video that was live - streamed on Facebook while this was all But I think there’s this other piece that we really need to start grappling with as a society, which

In pictures: NZ attack

Christchurch shooting victims' burials to begin.
Burials for the 50 Muslims murdered by an Australian white supremacist are about to begin at the Memorial Park Cemetery in Christchurch. It is expected that two of the victims will be buried this morning. Authorities understand a mass burial will also take place later, but are taking their instructions from family members. It is understood that having been washed and shrouded for burial the victims will be transported to a marquee set up by the prepared grave sites at the cemetery where prayers will take place. © AAP Mufti Zeeyad Ravat leads a pray at a makeshift memorial at the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch.

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