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WorldNotre Dame fire: Was the crown of thorns that survived the blaze THE crown of thorns?

12:52  18 april  2019
12:52  18 april  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

Fire wrecks Notre-Dame Cathedral, centuries-old Parisian landmark

Fire wrecks Notre-Dame Cathedral, centuries-old Parisian landmark A fire broke out at Notre Dame Cathedral in central Paris on Monday afternoon, a spokesman from the fire department said.

The Holy Crown of Thorns is displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame . (Reuters: Philippe Wojazer). Texts dating back to about AD 530 claim the crown was on show in the "Basilica of Mount Zion" — a hill in Jerusalem just outside the walls of the Old City — where it was believed to have been

The crown finds its roots in early Christianity For those more spiritually inclined, according to three of the four canonical Gospels, a woven crown of thorns © Reuters: Philippe Wojazer The Holy Crown of Thorns is displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame . Texts dating back to about AD 530 claim

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Notre Dame fire: Was the crown of thorns that survived the blaze THE crown of thorns?

Notre Dame fire: Was the crown of thorns that survived the blaze THE crown of thorns? © Reuters: Philippe Wojazer French Archbishop Patrick Chauvet holds the crown of thorns. So it should come as little surprise that a fire that threatened to destroy the centuries-old Notre Dame cathedral where the religious relic was housed was unable to cement its demise.

But as authorities count the cost of the treasure trove of historic and religious artefacts lost to Tuesday's blaze, some have questioned how Parisians even got their hands on a relic purported to have originated in first-century Judea.

Crown of Thorns saved from Notre Dame fire

Crown of Thorns saved from Notre Dame fire The Notre Dame cathedral in Paris is home to ancient relics held sacred by Catholics, and as the structure burned on Monday, there were fears that all of the irreplaceable items inside might be destroyed. By late Monday, police announced that the fire was under control, and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo shared some good news: The Crown of Thorns, a relic believed to have been worn by Jesus Christ, was safe, along with the Tunic of Saint Louis. She also said several pieces of artwork made it out unscathed, but did not specify which pieces. © Phillipe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images The Crown of Thorns.

The crown finds its roots in early Christianity For those more spiritually inclined, according to three of the four canonical Gospels, a woven crown of thorns © Reuters: Philippe Wojazer The Holy Crown of Thorns is displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame . Texts dating back to about AD 530 claim

The crown finds its roots in early Christianity For those more spiritually inclined, according to three of the four canonical Gospels, a woven crown of thorns © Reuters: Philippe Wojazer The Holy Crown of Thorns is displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame . Texts dating back to about AD 530 claim

So what is the significance of the crown of thorns to the story of Easter? Where does it come from? And can we be sure it's actually the real deal?

The crown finds its roots in early Christianity For those more spiritually inclined, according to three of the four canonical Gospels, a woven crown of thorns was placed on the head of Jesus in the lead-up to his crucifixion (this was sometime between AD 30-33).

The crown is considered one of the Instruments of the Passion (otherwise known as Arma Christi) — objects associated with Jesus's Passion in Christian symbolism and art — and was employed by his captors to mock his claim of authority and cause pain.

"And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand," the Gospel of Matthew says (King James Version translation).

The hero who saved the Crown of Thorns: Fire brigade chaplain entered flaming Notre Dame to recover holy relic - three years after he bravely helped Bataclan terror victims

The hero who saved the Crown of Thorns: Fire brigade chaplain entered flaming Notre Dame to recover holy relic - three years after he bravely helped Bataclan terror victims Jean-Marc Fournier, chaplain of the Paris Fire Brigade, saved the Blessed Sacrament and the Crown of Thorns from the blazing Notre Dame cathedral on Monday night.

The crown finds its roots in early Christianity For those more spiritually inclined, according to three of the four canonical Gospels, a woven crown of thorns © Reuters: Philippe Wojazer The Holy Crown of Thorns is displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame . Texts dating back to about AD 530 claim

Notre - Dame is home to relics from the Passion of Christ, described as a piece of the cross, a nail and the Holy Crown of Thorns , said to have been worn by Jesus before Most visitors to Notre - Dame will spend some time standing before two Gothic towers which crown the western facade of the cathedral.

"And they bowed the knee and mocked him, saying, 'Hail, King of the Jews!'"

The relic is further referenced by the Church fathers — ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers — and has become synonymous with artistic interpretations of the Passion.

It's a while before it turns up

Notre Dame fire: Was the crown of thorns that survived the blaze THE crown of thorns? © Reuters: Philippe Wojazer The Holy Crown of Thorns is displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame. Texts dating back to about AD 530 claim the crown was on show in the "Basilica of Mount Zion" — a hill in Jerusalem just outside the walls of the Old City — where it was believed to have been venerated for some time.

Then things get a little bit trickier to trace.

At some point over the next couple of hundred years, the crown was transferred to Byzantium (an ancient Greek colony), where several thorns were removed.

Justinian the Great, the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire, purportedly gave a thorn to Saint Germain, the Bishop of Paris.

Shock, sadness, but no panic: Minutes that saved Notre Dame

Shock, sadness, but no panic: Minutes that saved Notre Dame Fueled by a network of ancient wooden beams, the fire moved hungrily across Notre Dame's rooftop toward the cathedral's iconic spire. It belched yellow smoke, spitting out gritty particles of wood, stone, lead and iron and wanted more. Far below, their vision obscured by fumes and tears, firefighters, priests and municipal workers passed treasures hand-to-hand, hoping the speed of desperation could outrun the flames. They had 66 minutes. The first alarm sounded at 6:20 p.m., silencing the priest and a few hundred worshippers and tourists inside.

He carried the Crown of Thorns into Paris in 1239 while possibly wearing the tunic. The recovery of the artifacts is the latest bit of optimism for French officials and Notre Dame aficionados around the globe, who have been watching intently since Monday's fire laid waste to large swaths of the church's

Notre Dame 's treasures survive fire . As the smoke began to clear from the devastating fire at Paris' Notre Dame cathedral, the world's attention shifted to the irreplaceable collection of This 2014 file photo shows the Crown of Thorns displayed during a ceremony at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

Some years later, Irene of Athens, a Byzantine empress, sent Charles the Great (the Holy Roman Emperor) several thorns to be kept in Aachen.

Then, like a blender given to you at Christmas, they were re-gifted.

Charles the Bald (who was purportedly excessively hairy) and Hugh the Great (not to be confused with Hugh the OK) were among the litany of recipients.

Eventually, thorns found their way to Malmesbury Abbey in England and Andechs Abbey in Germany.

Slowly but surely, the crown (or at least part of it) made its way to Europe.

It's a long story as to how France got it

But the TL;DR of it is this: the Latin Emperor of Constantinople realised he was a bit of a Neville No Friends and used it to try and buy support.

In 1238, Baldwin II offered the crown to Louis IX, the King of France, to gain backing for his tottering empire.

It ended up in the hands of the Venetians for a while as security for a heavy loan but inevitably found its way back to Paris.

King Louis XI commissioned the Sainte-Chapelle to house it, where it stayed until the French Revolution when it was deposited in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.

$1 billion raised to rebuild Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral after fire

$1 billion raised to rebuild Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral after fire PARIS — Nearly $1 billion has already poured in from ordinary worshippers and high-powered magnates around the world to restore Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris after a massive fire. 

The fire that destroyed two-thirds of the roof of the Cathedral of Notre - Dame in Paris on Monday did more than damage a beloved historic landmark: It The crown of thorns and religious artifacts. That includes the church bells — the largest of which date to 1681 and survived the French Revolution.

The Crown of Thorns , which is considered Paris’s equivalent of the Crown Jewels, is normally stored at the end of a nave of It is not yet known whether the cathedral's ten bells survived the blaze . Notre Dame fire - This is the moment the Spire collapses as blaze breaks out at the cathedral.

And that's where it had been ever since... until this week.

The Mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, says it's now in a "safe place" along with the tunic of Saint Louis and several other major works.

Not all Christians accept the historicity of relics, however

Notre Dame fire: Was the crown of thorns that survived the blaze THE crown of thorns? Indeed, John Calvin, a key figure in the Protestant Reformation, was very much against them.

He published his Treatise on Relics in 1543 in which he argued the veneration of relics had become idolatry. He also pointed out there was no mention of the keeping of the relics of Christ or anyone else in the earliest church writings.

Professor Euan Cameron from Union Theological Seminary in New York summarised the difficulties with relics in his book Interpreting Christian History:

"The deliberate avoidance of anything savouring of idolatry in the early church made it most unlikely that any such relics would have been kept in the first place.

"Then there was the problem that so many relics existed in multiple versions across Europe: one saint might have up to four full bodies dispersed in various places, besides body parts dispersed here and there."

Professor Cameron noted that most relics began to be exhibited in the late Middle Ages, and often had telltale markers of that period.

His conclusion was that most, if not all, had to be forgeries.

'Short circuit' most likely cause of Notre-Dame fire - police

'Short circuit' most likely cause of Notre-Dame fire - police Investigators think an electrical short-circuit was the most likely cause of the Notre-Dame cathedral fire, a police official has said. The fire on Monday tore through the Parisian landmark, destroying much of the inside and causing the spire to come crashing down. Firefighters say that Notre-Dame came within 15 to 30 minutes of total destruction. Hundreds of millions of euros have been pledged by businessmen and philanthropists, as President Macron vowed to rebuild the cathedral within five years.

Pictures: In photos: Notre Dame Cathedral fire

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Workers smoked at Notre-Dame cathedral, admits contractor.
Workers renovating Notre-Dame flouted a ban on smoking at the monument, a contractor admitted on Wednesday, while denying any link with last week's devastating blaze that ripped through the cathedral. 

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