World: Sri Lanka attacks show Islamic State influence outlives caliphate - PressFrom - Australia
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WorldSri Lanka attacks show Islamic State influence outlives caliphate

17:52  23 april  2019
17:52  23 april  2019 Source:   msn.com

Divisive right wing senator Fraser Anning responds to Sri Lanka terror attacks which left 290 dead including two Australians by saying 'Islamic populations create violence'

Divisive right wing senator Fraser Anning responds to Sri Lanka terror attacks which left 290 dead including two Australians by saying 'Islamic populations create violence' Queensland Senator Fraser Anning has sparked controversy once again after blaming the terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka on 'Islamic populations creating violence'. In a series of Tweets on Monday night, the senator responded to the deaths of nearly 300 people, including Australian mother Manik Suriaaratchi and her daughter, Alexandria, 10, in coordinated explosions on Easter Sunday. Suicide bombers targeted three churches, three luxury hotels, and a guesthouse, with authorities finding and disposing of another explosive at the airport later the same day.

The devastating bomb attacks in Sri Lanka , claimed by Islamic State jihadists, show that the influence of the group's extremist ideology remains dangerously intact even after the collapse of its so-called caliphate in Iraq and Syria, experts say. Blast near church while Sri Lanka bomb squad was

The devastating bomb attacks in Sri Lanka , claimed by Islamic State jihadists, show that the influence of the group's extremist ideology remains dangerously intact even after the collapse of its so-called caliphate in Iraq and Syria, experts say. Over 320 people were killed in a string of deadly.

The devastating bomb attacks in Sri Lanka, claimed by Islamic State jihadists, show that the influence of the group's extremist ideology remains dangerously intact even after the collapse of its so-called caliphate in Iraq and Syria, experts say.

Sri Lanka attacks show Islamic State influence outlives caliphate© JOEL SAGET A makeshift memorial in front of the Bataclan concert hall which was among the targets of the deadly attacks in 2015

Over 320 people were killed in a string of deadly suicide bomb blasts on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka targeting churches and luxury hotels.

Colombo said it believes that the little-known Islamic extremist group National Thowheeth Jama'ath (NTJ) was behind the attacks.

Islamic State claims responsibility for Sri Lanka bombings

Islamic State claims responsibility for Sri Lanka bombings Islamic State claims responsibility for Sri Lanka bombings

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — The Islamic State claimed responsibility on Tuesday for the coordinated suicide bombings on churches and hotels in Sri Lanka , as the president of the traumatized nation promised to dismiss senior officials who had failed to act on warnings about the attacks .

What the Islamic State lost in territory it did not lose in ideological influence . “I don’t think it’s too soon to say that defeat of the physical caliphate in Iraq and Syria Its influence has also spread to places where it hasn’t traditionally held sway. Last week, through its Amaq News Agency, the group asserted

But it has also suggested that a bigger international group helped plan the carnage as "retaliation" for shootings at two mosques in New Zealand last month that killed 50 people.

Sri Lanka attacks show Islamic State influence outlives caliphate© ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo warned that radical Islamists remain a threat

On Tuesday, a statement released by the Islamist State (IS) propaganda agency Amaq said the attackers were "fighters" from the terror network.

Zachary Abuza, professor at the National War College in Washington, said the Sri Lanka attacks were a warning of a new jihadist strategy following their military defeat in Iraq and Syria.

Sri Lanka attacks show Islamic State influence outlives caliphate© Juni Kriswanto The sheer scale of the Sri Lanka attacks suggest that they may have been planned overseas

"I would say that what we saw in Sri Lanka is a new front being opened in the global jihadi insurgency," he told AFP.

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Sri Lanka defence minister says bombings were response to killing of Muslims in Christchurch.

Islamic State claimed responsibility on Tuesday for the bomb attacks in Sri Lanka that killed 321 people in what officials believe was retaliation for The government has said at least seven suicide bombers were involved. In a statement, Islamic State named what it said were the seven attackers

He said IS was still able to inspire attacks and give militants anywhere in the world a sense of "urgency".

"Anyone can act in the Islamic State's name, and they will take credit for it," Abuza said.

- 'Compensate for losses' -

Rohan Gunaratna, a security expert with the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore, told AFP he believed NTJ was indeed now linked to IS.

"IS has created support groups around the world," he said, adding that some NTJ members were radicalised by the local group then joined IS.

At the peak of its military success, IS claimed a string of attacks around the world, from the November 2015 coordinated attacks in Paris to the deadly rampage of a gunman at an Istanbul nightclub minutes into 2017.

In late March, Kurdish-dominated and US-backed forces flushed out IS fighters from their last bastion in Syria in what was hailed as a final military defeat for the group after it list its strongholds one-by-one in Syria and Iraq.

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Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the deadly terrorist blasts in Sri Lanka , as investigations intensified into Sunday’s coordinated attacks that "Those who carried out the attack that targeted citizens belonging to the alliance countries and Christians in Sri Lanka are fighters with the Islamic

IS may be linked to bomb blasts which killed more than 320 people and wounded 500, Sri Lanka ’s prime minister has said. He conceded that a failure to share

But governments and analysts have always warned that the risk of attacks anywhere in the world remains just as high, be it from extremists who fought for IS in Syria and Iraq or those simply inspired by them.

Sri Lanka attacks show Islamic State influence outlives caliphate© Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters A woman reacts next to two coffins during a mass burial of victims, two days after a string of suicide bomb attacks on churches and luxury hotels across the island on Easter Sunday, at a cemetery near St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 23, 2019. After the Sri Lanka bombings, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo warned that "radical Islamic terror remains a threat", saying the United States needs to stay "active and vigilant".

According to the SITE Intelligence Group, a known supporter of IS published on a social media channel pictures of three purported "commandos" involved in the Sri Lanka attacks standing with raised fingers against an IS flag.

Jean-Pierre Filiu, professor at Sciences Po-Paris, said IS is now adopting what he dubbed a "glocal" strategy by staging local attacks anywhere in a bid to make a global impact.

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Sri Lanka 's prime minister has said he believes the attacks on Easter Sunday which claimed the lives of over 320 people had links to the so-called Islamic State group. The militant group has claimed responsibility for the series of the bombings, which were carried out at three churches and ffour hotels.

Islamic State supporters are spreading this infographic glorifying the Sri Lanka attacks on social media, according to the SITE intel group. Ms Katz says the Colombo attacks mirror the Islamic State bombing of a Roman Catholic cathedral on Jolo island in the southern Philippines on January 27.

The jihadist group is "trying to compensate symbolically and in the media for the loss of its strongholds in Syria and Iraq and instead relaunch a terrorist campaign on a planetary scale".

- 'Serious proposition' -

Bruce Hoffmann, senior fellow for counterterrorism and homeland security at the Council on Foreign Relations, said such attacks require considerable expertise and logistical support at every stage -- from recruitment to transport to the target sites.

"A half-dozen simultaneous attacks is a serious proposition. It would be very unusual for a group that basically had no track record," he said.

Little is known about the NTJ, which previously has only been linked to vandalising Buddhist statues.

Ethnic and religious violence has plagued Sri Lanka for decades, with a 37-year conflict with Tamil rebels followed by an upswing in recent years in clashes between the Buddhist majority and Muslims.

But it had not been seen by analysts as a potential crucible for Islamist extremist terror. Yet IS has made inroads in Asia, notably in Afghanistan, the Philippines and Indonesia.

Pictures: In photos: Sri Lanka serial blasts

Sri Lanka identifies 9 Easter Sunday suicide bombers.
Although several of the names had been reported by various media outlets, three of the bombers were previously unknown.

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